Skip to main content

Main Area

Main

100 best action movies of all time

1/
Lucasfilm Ltd.

100 best action movies of all time

If Hollywood’s most recent output is a testament to one thing and one thing only, it’s that audiences simply can’t get enough action. For proof, look no further than the never-ending deluge of superhero movies, each of which might vary in terms of plot, but remain brutally consistent in their delivery of death-defying stunts and CGI-laden spectacles. Sure, the multiple stories can be hard to follow, but the actors don't always have to deliver Oscar-winning performances when a film can shoot adrenaline directly through your eyeballs.

While the theaters might seem overstuffed with action movies these days, the genre itself is far from a new phenomenon. In fact, some historians would posit that action films go back over 110 years, to 1903’s “The Great Train Robbery.” Regardless of origin, the genre has dutifully stayed its course decade after decade, luring audiences to theaters for the kind of experience that always goes down better on the big screen, in surround sound no less. It’s no wonder that Hollywood’s most expensive films are almost always full-blown action movies.

From epic swashbucklers to the cream of the comic book crop, Stacker ranked the 100 best action movies of all time. The list focuses on English-language films with at least 10,000 votes on IMDb. Using data that combines the Rotten Tomatoes’ Tomatometer and IMDb ratings, each film was given a Stacker score. Starting with the great, counting down to the greater, and ending with the greatest, find out which flicks are truly the 100 best action movies of all time.

2/
Touchstone Pictures

#100. Face/Off

Runtime: 138 min
Stacker score: 82.5
IMDb rating: 7.3
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 92

Directed by action legend John Woo, 1997’s “Face/Off” is quite simply the stuff that outrageous action plots are made of. In the film, a cop and criminal undergo surgeries to take on each other’s faces, assuming one another’s respective careers in the process. John Travolta (at the height of a career resurgence) and Nicolas Cage star, although the screenplay was originally written with Sylvester Stallone and Arnold Schwarzenegger in mind.

3/
Lucasfilm

#99. Star Wars: Episode VIII--The Last Jedi

Runtime: 152 min
Stacker score: 82.5
IMDb rating: 7.4
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 91

As the last film in the original “Star Wars” trilogy, “Return of the Jedi” finds Luke Skywalker squaring off against Darth Vader and the evil empire one last time. To ensure secrecy during production, the movie was shot under the name “Blue Harvest: Horror Beyond Imagination.” Decades later, cartoon sitcom “Family Guy” released a “Star Wars” parody under a very similar name.

4/
Marvel Studios

#98. Doctor Strange

Runtime: 115 min
Stacker score: 82.5
IMDb rating: 7.5
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 90

No list of best action movies is complete without comic book adaptations...lots and lots of comic book adaptations. Kicking things off in that department is 2016’s “Doctor Strange,” which stars Benedict Cumberbatch as a neurosurgeon turned sorcerer, who traverses multiple planes and dimensions in order to protect the world.

5/
Paramount Pictures

#97. The Warriors

Runtime: 92 min
Stacker score: 83
IMDb rating: 7.7
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 89

A cult classic to this day, Walter Hill’s “The Warriors” centers on a futuristic street gang who must prove to the other gangs that it didn’t kill a popular underworld leader. Filming took place in New York, and the shoot was a downright hectic affair, belabored by various noise complaints and an attack from actual city gang members.

6/
Misty Mountains

#96. The Nice Guys

Runtime: 116 min
Stacker score: 83
IMDb rating: 7.4
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 92

In the mid-1980s, screenwriter Shane Black essentially reinvented the action genre with “Lethal Weapon,” and in 2016’s “The Nice Guys,” Black similarly blends violence and comedy by way of a mismatched buddy premise. The movie tells the story of two private eyes (played by Ryan Gosling and Russell Crowe) from different walks of life, who form an unlikely duo when they team up to investigate a series of interconnected crimes. 

7/
Chernin Entertainment

#95. Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

Runtime: 130 min
Stacker score: 83
IMDb rating: 7.6
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 90

Taking place 10 years after the events of “Rise of the Planet of the Apes,” 2014’s “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes” finds humanity on the brink of extinction in the wake of a deadly virus. To make matters worse, a small colony of survivors must square off against a clan of genetically evolved apes. Regardless of the movie’s outcome, the title is pretty much a dead giveaway in terms of who wins in the long run.

8/
Columbia Pictures Corporation

#94. Spider-Man 2

Runtime: 127 min
Stacker score: 83
IMDb rating: 7.3
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 93

Warmly received by critics and audiences alike, Sam Raimi’s “Spider-Man 2” sees Peter Parker doing battle against Doctor Otto Octavius, a brilliant scientist turned supervillain who has mechanical tentacles at his disposal. Actor Alfred Molina played the iconic villain, and he gave each tentacle an individual name behind the scenes.

9/
Miramax

#93. Kill Bill: Vol. 1

Runtime: 111 min
Stacker score: 83
IMDb rating: 8.1
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 85

In “Kill Bill Vol. 1,” filmmaker Quentin Tarantino puts his own signature touch on the kung-fu genre. The movie stars Uma Thurman as The Bride, a former female assassin sent on a quest for revenge after her old boss and his cronies murder everyone at her wedding. Thurman and Tarantino came up with the premise all the way back in 1994, when working together on “Pulp Fiction.” 

10/
Pax Enterprises

#92. The Professionals

Runtime: 117 min
Stacker score: 83.5
IMDb rating: 7.4
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 93

In 1966’s “The Professionals,” a millionaire hires a team of rugged men to rescue his wife from the Mexican criminal who kidnapped her. Actor Burt Lancaster was 52 years old when he starred in the film, but that didn’t stop him from performing all his own stunts.

11/
Warner Bros.

#91. Superman II: The Richard Donner Cut

Runtime: 115 min
Stacker score: 83.5
IMDb rating: 7.7
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 90

Director Richard Donner had completed about 75% of 1980’s “Superman II” before being unceremoniously replaced by Richard Lester, who ended up making a very different film. However, in 2006, Donner’s vision was restored and released to substantial acclaim, now ranking higher than both the original theatrical version and its predecessor. In the film, Superman gives up his powers to be with sweetheart Lois Lane, just as some evil Kryptonians descend upon the planet and proceed to wreak havoc.

 

 

12/
Gershwin-Kastner Productions

#90. Where Eagles Dare

Runtime: 158 min
Stacker score: 83.5
IMDb rating: 7.7
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 90

Starring action genre mainstay Clint Eastwood, 1968’s “Where Eagles Dare” tells the story of allied agents who storm a Nazi castle in order to rescue a military general. The film was written by Alistair MacLean, who also wrote the novel upon which the movie was based. In fact, MacLean reportedly wrote the book and the script simultaneously over a six-week span.

 

13/
Paramount Pictures

#89. Mission: Impossible--Rogue Nation

Runtime: 131 min
Stacker score: 83.5
IMDb rating: 7.4
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 93

The fifth installment in the “Mission Impossible” franchise, “Rogue Nation” finds super spy Ethan Hunt going off on his own in order to take down a deadly organization known only as the Syndicate. During the opening sequence, Hunt grips the side of a plane as it soars thousands of feet in the air. Not only did lead actor Tom Cruise perform the stunt himself, but he did it more than once.

14/
Columbia Pictures

#88. Spider-Man: Homecoming

Runtime: 133 min
Stacker score: 83.5
IMDb rating: 7.5
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 92

A reboot of a reboot, 2017 “Spider-Man: Homecoming” resurrects the “Spider-Man” franchise with admirable panache, welcoming its titular hero into the broader Marvel universe. In the film, Peter Parker struggles to balance his personal life with his adventurous exploits. “Iron Man”’s Tony Stark (played by Robert Downey Jr.) appears as Peter Parker’s mentor.

15/
FortyFour Studios

#87. Big Hero 6

Runtime: 102 min
Stacker score: 83.5
IMDb rating: 7.8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 89

A young boy and his big, inflatable robot help form a group of tech-savvy superheroes in the 2014 animated feature “Big Hero 6.” The movie goes as big on heartwarming laughs as it does heart-pounding action. It’s also the first animated Disney movie based on a Marvel comic.

 

16/
Paramount Pictures

#86. Mission: Impossible--Ghost Protocol

Runtime: 132 min
Stacker score: 83.5
IMDb rating: 7.4
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 93

Before “Mission Impossible - Rogue Nation,” there came “Mission Impossible--Ghost Protocol,” in which Ethan Hunt and his team must prove they weren’t behind a bombing of the Kremlin. Directed by Brad Bird, the film once again sees Tom Cruise tackling his own stunts, including a death-defying leap from the world’s tallest building.

17/
Warner Bros.

#85. Wonder Woman

Runtime: 141 min
Stacker score: 83.5
IMDb rating: 7.5
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 92

In 2017’s “Wonder Woman,” Gal Gadot plays the mighty heroine, who must leave her isolated island to help eradicate evil from the world. Proving just how fit she was for the role, Gadot performed reshoots while five months pregnant with her second child. That’s not to mention her previous exploits as a member of the Israeli military.

18/
Endgame Entertainment

#84. Looper

Runtime: 113 min
Stacker score: 83.5
IMDb rating: 7.4
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 93

Before stirring up all sorts of fanfare (and controversy) with “The Last Jedi,” filmmaker Rian Johnson delivered 2012’s “Looper,” about a man who kills people as soon as those people arrive from the future. Meanwhile, the movie itself takes place in a futuristic society and deals with the fallout of its protagonist choosing not to kill his next target, who happens to be himself. Confused yet?

19/
Marvel Entertainment

#83. Captain America: The Winter Soldier

Runtime: 136 min
Stacker score: 83.5
IMDb rating: 7.8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 89

By infusing the comic book movie subgenre with plot devices commonly found in political thrillers, “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” ably distinguished itself from the herd upon its 2014 debut, earning all sorts of acclaim in the process. The movie--which sees the all-American superhero doing battle against both government entities and a formidable assassin--raked in over $700 million at the worldwide box office.

20/
Warner Bros.

#82. Batman Begins

Runtime: 140 min
Stacker score: 83.5
IMDb rating: 8.3
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 84

In grim and spectacular style, Christopher Nolan’s “Batman Begins” kicked off a new era of serious comic book adaptations, many of which similarly kept the atmosphere dark and the camp factor non-existent. Additionally, the film broadened the scope of the Batman mythology, showing not just Bruce Wayne’s harrowing experiences as a young boy, but also the subsequent training and skill building he underwent before donning the bat suit. It was a far cry from 1997’s “Batman & Robin” to say the least. 

21/
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

#81. The Magnificent Seven

Runtime: 128 min
Stacker score: 84
IMDb rating: 7.8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 90

Not to be confused with the 2016 remake, 1960’s “The Magnificent Seven” centers on a group of seven gunfighters who defend a poor Mexican village against invaders. The movie was itself an adaptation of Akira Kurosawa’s “The Seven Samurai” from 1954.

22/
Warner Brothers/Seven Arts

#80. Bonnie and Clyde

Runtime: 111 min
Stacker score: 84
IMDb rating: 7.9
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 89

Ushering in a new era of screen violence was 1967’s “Bonnie and Clyde,” in which two rebellious lovers embark on a crime spree during the Depression era, leaving a trail of bullets and blood in their wake. Inspired by the real-life exploits of Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow (as well as other Depression-era outlaws like John Dillinger), the film stars Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway in the lead roles.

23/
Twentieth Century Fox

#79. War for the Planet of the Apes

Runtime: 140 min
Stacker score: 84
IMDb rating: 7.5
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 93

First there came the rise, followed by the dawn, and in 2017 it was an all-out “War for the Planet of the Apes.” Directed by Matt Reeves, the film sees lead ape Caesar struggling internally as he seeks revenge on the human responsible for killing his wife and child. 

24/
Twentieth Century Fox

#78. Minority Report

Runtime: 145 min
Stacker score: 84
IMDb rating: 7.7
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 91

Based on a story by sci-fi legend Philip K. Dick, 2002’s “Minority Report” stars Tom Cruise as a cop who relies on the visions of clairvoyant beings known as precogs, in order to arrest people for crimes that haven’t yet occurred. However, after the precogs see Cruise himself committing a crime, he goes on the lamb to prove his innocence. The film was directed by Steven Spielberg, who along with Cruise took a pay cut in order to keep the budget under $100 million.

25/
Darryl F. Zanuck Productions

#77. The Longest Day

Runtime: 178 min
Stacker score: 84.5
IMDb rating: 7.8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 91

It’s the story of D-Day from both German and Allied perspectives in 1962’s “The Longest Day,” which stars John Wayne, Robert Mitchum and Sean Connery. President Dwight Eisenhower wanted to play himself in the film, but was considered too old for the part. According to legend, Eisenhower went to see the film and walked out minutes later, citing inaccuracies. 

26/
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

#76. The Dirty Dozen

Runtime: 150 min
Stacker score: 84.5
IMDb rating: 7.8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 91

Another WWII classic, “The Dirty Dozen” sees a group of convicted murderers being sent on a mission to assassinate German officers. Directed by Robert Aldrich, and starring Lee Marvin, Ernest Borgnine and Charles Bronson, the film was one among a handful to later inspire Quentin Tarantino’s “Inglourious Basterds.” 

 

27/
Digital Image Associates

#75. Star Trek: First Contact

Runtime: 111 min
Stacker score: 84.5
IMDb rating: 7.6
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 93

The “Star Trek” franchise always goes big on action and 1996’s “Star Trek: First Contact” was no exception. Presenting a literal race against time, the film pits Captain Picard and his crew against the villainous Borg, who want travel into the past to stop humans and Vulcans from ever making contact. Jonathan Frakes--who plays Commander T. Riker--also took on directing duties for this installment.

28/
DreamWorks Animation

#74. How to Train Your Dragon 2

Runtime: 102 min
Stacker score: 84.5
IMDb rating: 7.8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 91

A follow-up to the mega-successful animated flick “How to Train Your Dragon” from 2010, 2014’s “How to Train Your Dragon 2” finds young protagonist (and dragon enthusiast) Hiccup once again working to keep the peace between Vikings and dragons, while discovering the true identity of his own mother. The second installment in a planned trilogy, the film explores themes of connectivity and independence alike.

 

29/
Black Label Media

#73. Sicario

Runtime: 121 min
Stacker score: 84.5
IMDb rating: 7.6
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 93

Directed by Denis Villeneuve, 2015’s “Sicario” tells the story of an FBI agent who’s recruited to eliminate a vicious drug cartel near the Mexican border. Emily Blunt plays the lead role, and Benicio Del Toro co-stars as a brooding fellow agent. In the original script, Del Toro’s character had many more lines, but the actor insisted on cutting up to 90% of them in order to exhibit more of an unspoken presence.

30/
Marvel Studios

#72. Captain America: Civil War

Runtime: 147 min
Stacker score: 84.5
IMDb rating: 7.8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 91

Less a “Captain America” movie and more an “Avengers” offshoot, “Captain America: Civil War” finds its hero at odds with Iron Man himself. Not only that, but the film expands upon Captain America’s distrust of his own government and its interventionist policies. As a result, the movie in some ways undermines--or at the very least explores--the sense of patriotic duty that launched the series in the first place.

31/
Warner Bros.

#71. Edge of Tomorrow

Runtime: 113 min
Stacker score: 84.5
IMDb rating: 7.9
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 90

In 2014’s “Edge of Tomorrow,” Tom Cruise is stuck reliving the same day over and over again, as he and a team of futuristic soldiers do battle against alien invaders. Emily Blunt co-stars, and she nearly killed Tom Cruise during the shoot, after driving too fast around a turn and hitting a tree. Naturally, that hasn’t stopped Cruise from continuing to perform his own stunts, though he probably remembers to put on his seatbelt more often these days. 

32/
Warner Bros.

#70. High Sierra

Runtime: 100 min
Stacker score: 85
IMDb rating: 7.6
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 94

Humphrey Bogart stars as Roy ‘Mad Dog’ Earle in “High Sierra.” In the film, Earle is busted out of prison and enlisted to pull off a bank robbery, which quickly goes awry. It’s a classic tale of hard-boiled crime and tawdry romance, as only Bogart can deliver it.

33/
Walter Wanger Productions

#69. Foreign Correspondent

Runtime: 120 min
Stacker score: 85
IMDb rating: 7.6
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 94

One of Alfred Hitchcock’s lesser known films, 1940’s “Foreign Correspondent” tells the story of an American reporter who gets in over his head while investigating a secret European treaty during WWII. Look for the obligatory cameo from Hitch himself at about the thirteen minute mark.

 

34/
Mann/Caan Productions

#68. Thief

Runtime: 122 min
Stacker score: 85
IMDb rating: 7.4
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 96

The first theatrical release from director Michael Mann, 1981’s “Thief” stars James Caan as a safecracker who’s pulled into a final (and potentially deadly) job by the mafia. Mann would continue to explore the criminal underworld and utilize synth heavy scores in later works like “Miami Vice” and “Heat.”

35/
TriStar Pictures

#67. Baby Driver

Runtime: 112 min
Stacker score: 85
IMDb rating: 7.7
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 93

While propulsive music is a fundamental component to any given action flick, 2017’s “Baby Driver” truly puts the soundtrack in the front seat, building sequences around specific songs (when it’s usually the other way around). In the film, a getaway driver with a penchant for classic tunes gets lured into an impossible heist. Director Edgar Wright began envisioning some of the scenes as early as 1995, while listening to Jon Spencer Blues Explosion.

36/
Exclusive Media Group

#66. Rush

Runtime: 123 min
Stacker score: 85
IMDb rating: 8.1
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 89

Based on a true story, 2013’s “Rush” centers on the rivalry between two Formula One race car drivers during the 1970s. One of those drivers was Niki Lauda, who watched the movie and found himself impressed with its overall accuracy. The other driver was James Hunt, a notorious playboy portrayed by Chris Hemsworth in the film.

37/
StudioCanal

#65. Hot Fuzz

Runtime: 121 min
Stacker score: 85
IMDb rating: 7.9
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 91

Filmmaker Edgar Wright makes his second appearance on the list with 2007’s “Hot Fuzz,” which pokes fun at action movies as much as it does honor them. In the film, an overzealous London cop is sent to a small, seemingly boring town, where he and a new partner investigate a homicide. This is the second installment in Wright’s “Cornetto Trilogy,” which takes its name from a popular ice cream cone treat.

38/
Eon Productions

#64. Skyfall

Runtime: 143 min
Stacker score: 85
IMDb rating: 7.8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 92

Superspy James Bond is always synonymous with pulse-pounding action sequences, and 2012’s “Skyfall” naturally goes big on spectacle. Directed by Sam Mendes, the film pits its iconic hero against a diabolical madman with a thoroughly developed taste for chaos. 

39/
Twentieth Century Fox

#63. X-Men: Days of Future Past

Runtime: 132 min
Stacker score: 85
IMDb rating: 8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 90

In “X-Men: Days of Future Past,” Wolverine must time travel back in time to stop a man from creating massive robots, before those robots destroy mankind and mutants alike. To get a firm grasp on the concepts of time travel, director Bryan Singer had an intensive two hour conversation on the topic with James Cameron, who had explored similar concepts in his “Terminator” franchise.

40/
Columbia Pictures Corporation

#62. The Guns of Navarone

Runtime: null
Stacker score: 85.5
IMDb rating: 7.6
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 95

Nominated for a Best Picture Oscar among other awards, “The Guns of Navarone” is about a group of British men sent on a mission to destroy a powerful German gun emplacement. During the shoot, director J. Lee Thompson was tasked with keeping the peace between the cast’s various alpha males, earning him the nickname “Mighty Mouse.”

41/
Eon Productions

#61. From Russia with Love

Runtime: 115 min
Stacker score: 85.5
IMDb rating: 7.5
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 96

Another classic James Bond film, 1963’s “From Russia With Love” sends Agent 007 on the hunt for an advanced coding machine, which he must find before his enemies do. The second installment in a long-running franchise, this film features a thrilling pre-credit sequence and some exotic locales, among other things.

 

42/
Marvel Entertainment

#60. Thor: Ragnarok

Runtime: 130 min
Stacker score: 85.5
IMDb rating: 7.9
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 92

In “Thor: Ragnarok,” the hammer-wielding Marvel hero must escape imprisonment and save his planet from being destroyed before it’s too late. While the premise might seem familiar, the film itself takes on a distinctly colorful palette and playful tonality, both of which help distinguish it from other movies of its kind.

43/
Paramount Pictures

#59. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade

Runtime: 127 min
Stacker score: 85.5
IMDb rating: 8.3
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 88

If adventure went by any other name, it might as well be Indiana Jones. Capping off the original trilogy was 1989’s “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade,” in which the fearless archaeologist teams up with his father to find the Holy Grail before the Nazis get their hands on it. During a scene in the catacombs, Jones encounters a horde of two thousand rats, each one having been carefully bred in advance by trained animal handlers

44/
Warner Bros.

#58. The Dark Knight Rises

Runtime: 164 min
Stacker score: 85.5
IMDb rating: 8.4
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 87

It’s Batman vs supervillain Bane in “The Dark Knight Rises,” the third film in Christopher Nolan’s “Dark Knight” trilogy. Actor Tom Hardy played Bane in the film, and he drew inspiration from a famous bare-knuckle fighter named Bartley Gorman when coming up with his accent.

45/
CKK

#57. Assault on Precinct 13

Runtime: 91 min
Stacker score: 86
IMDb rating: 7.4
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 98

Two years before stunning audiences with “Halloween,” filmmaker John Carpenter delivered 1976’s “Assault on Precinct 13,” about a group of mismatched heroes who defend a defunct police station from an invading gang. Working on a shoestring budget, Carpenter modeled the film after famous westerns like “Rio Bravo.”

46/
Solar Productions

#56. Bullitt

Runtime: 114 min
Stacker score: 86
IMDb rating: 7.5
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 97

Steve McQueen plays a hard-boiled cop named Bullitt in this 1968 film of the same name. In the film, Bullitt goes after an underworld kingpin who murdered a star witness. Featured in the movie is an iconic car chase sequence that took three weeks to shoot, with the cars going over 100 mph in real life

 

47/
Universal Pictures

#55. Midnight Run

Runtime: 126 min
Stacker score: 86
IMDb rating: 7.6
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 96

Blending action and comedy to compulsively watchable effect, 1988’s “Midnight Run” stars Robert De Niro as bounty hunter Jack Walsh, who embarks on a cross-country trip while bringing home his latest target. Charles Grodin plays the target, and he reportedly still has scars on his wrists from the handcuffs he wore in the film.

48/
Syncopy

#54. Dunkirk

Runtime: 106 min
Stacker score: 86
IMDb rating: 8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 92

Based on a true life event, Christopher Nolan’s “Dunkirk” follows Allied soldiers as they evacuate a beach while under attack from the German Army. The movie eschews traditional character development in favor of relentless action sequences and countless explosions. As a result, some veterans who were actually there claim the film is louder than the real event was.

49/
Marvel Studios

#53. Guardians of the Galaxy

Runtime: 121 min
Stacker score: 86
IMDb rating: 8.1
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 91

A group of intergalactic misfits work together to stop a villain from taking over the universe in 2014’s “Guardians of the Galaxy.” The film was an unexpected smash hit for Marvel, and the studio wasted no time putting together a sequel. One of the movie’s characters is a walking, talking tree monster named Groot, voiced by Vin Diesel. While Groot has basically just one line in the film--”I am Groot”--Diesel was asked to record that line approximately 1000 times.  

50/
Warner Bros.

#52. Dirty Harry

Runtime: 102 min
Stacker score: 86.5
IMDb rating: 7.8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 95

Clint Eastwood is a San Francisco cop with a big gun and a short temper in 1971’s “Dirty Harry.” The movie sends its no-nonsense protagonist on the trail of the Scorpio Killer, who is terrorizing the city. Originally, famous crooner Frank Sinatra was attached to play the lead role, dropping out after he injured his hand.

51/
Morgan Creek Entertainment

#51. The Last of the Mohicans

Runtime: 112 min
Stacker score: 86.5
IMDb rating: 7.8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 95

Bolstered by top-notch performances, epic cinematography and a sweeping score, 1992’s “Last of the Mohicans” centers on the story of three trappers caught up in the French and Indian War. To prepare for his role in the film, actor Daniel Day-Lewis spent six months working on upper-body strength, and then another month learning survival skills in the wilderness.

52/
Universal Pictures

#50. The Bourne Ultimatum

Runtime: 115 min
Stacker score: 86.5
IMDb rating: 8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 93

The last film in the original Jason Bourne trilogy, “The Bourne Ultimatum” pits its protagonist against corrupt entities within his own government. Director Paul Greengrass was unable to shut down Waterloo Train Station for an important scene, causing a dilemma when it came to potential onlookers who might end up in the shot. In order to create a distraction, he set up a mock camera crew at one end of the station, and then filmed the actual scene at the other end.

 

53/
Lucasfilm

#49. Star Wars: Episode VII--The Force Awakens

Runtime: 136 min
Stacker score: 86.5
IMDb rating: 8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 93

In 2015, the “Star Wars” franchise got the resurrection it deserved with “Star Wars: Episode VII - The Force Awakens.” To ensure audiences were satisfied, director J.J. Abrams stuck closely to the tone and story of the original trilogy, focusing on a young heroine named Rey who does battle against an evil order. Actor Mark Hamill reprised his role as Luke Skywalker, though his expected involvement had been drastically reduced by the time he showed up for the first table read.

54/
Paramount Pictures

#48. Iron Man

Runtime: 126 min
Stacker score: 86.5
IMDb rating: 7.9
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 94

The Marvel Cinematic Universe kicked off in spectacular style with 2008’s “Iron Man,” about an industrial magnate named Tony Stark, who must build a revolutionary suit of armor to escape from captivity. During the film’s development stages, actor Tom Cruise passed on the lead role, while Quentin Tarantino expressed interest in directing. As fate would have it, Robert Downey Jr. landed the part, with Jon Favreau helming. The rest, as they say, is history.

55/
Marvel Studios

#47. The Avengers

Runtime: 143 min
Stacker score: 86.5
IMDb rating: 8.1
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 92

The first wave of Marvel movies culminated in 2012 with “The Avengers,” in which all the various heroes and heroines do battle against Loki and his destructive alien army. Not only did the film rake in over $1.5 billion at the global box office, but an end credits scene involving shawarma caused a massive spike in the dish’s popularity.

 

56/
Warner Brothers/Seven Arts

#46. The Wild Bunch

Runtime: 135 min
Stacker score: 87
IMDb rating: 8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 94

From controversial director Sam Peckinpah came 1969’s “The Wild Bunch,” about a group of aging outlaws in pursuit of one final score. Striving for authenticity, Peckinpah insisted that every gunshot in the film delivered a distinct sound, contingent upon the type of gun that was firing it. 

57/
filler

#45. Mad Max 2

Runtime: 94 min
Stacker score: 87
IMDb rating: 7.6
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 98

Also known as “The Road Warrior,” 1981’s “Mad Max 2” features Mel Gibson as a former cop turned drifter in a post-apocalyptic wasteland. The movie includes a stunt so dangerous that the stuntman didn’t eat for 12 hours before performing it, just in case they needed to rush him to the hospital for emergency surgery. Meanwhile, Gibson has just 16 lines of dialogue in the film.

58/
Eon Productions

#44. Goldfinger

Runtime: 110 min
Stacker score: 87
IMDb rating: 7.7
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 97

While investigating a gold magnate for smuggling, British spy James Bond exposes a much bigger and graver plan in 1964’s “Goldfinger.” An instant success upon its debut, the film made it into the Guinness Book of World Records as being the fast grossing picture in movie history (at the time). This is director Steven Spielberg’s favorite Bond film.

 

59/
Warner Bros.

#43. The Fugitive

Runtime: 130 min
Stacker score: 87
IMDb rating: 7.8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 96

Awash with gripping action sequences and plenty of memorable dialogue (much of it improvised), 1993’s “The Fugitive” tells the story of a doctor who escapes from imprisonment after being falsely accused of murder. The film--which stars Harrison Ford and Tommy Lee Jones--was based on a 1960s TV show of the same name.

60/
Warner Bros.

#42. The LEGO Movie

Runtime: 100 min
Stacker score: 87
IMDb rating: 7.8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 96

Everything is awesome for the protagonist of “The LEGO Movie,” until he’s tasked with saving the world from the whims of Lord Business. In addition to being a box office success, the wildly inventive movie caused sales of actual LEGO sets to soar by 15%.

61/
Twentieth Century Fox

#41. Logan

Runtime: 137 min
Stacker score: 87
IMDb rating: 8.1
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 93

Before hanging up his claws for good (supposedly), Hugh Jackman played Wolverine one last time in 2017’s “Logan.” The movie takes place in a futuristic wasteland, and sees Wolverine working overtime to protect the ones he loves from being hunted down by an evil corporation.

62/
Columbia Pictures

#40. Casino Royale

Runtime: 144 min
Stacker score: 87
IMDb rating: 8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 94

2006’s “Casino Royale” takes audiences back to where it all began, presenting James Bond’s first mission as 007. Also featured is Daniel Craig’s first performance as the iconic spy. In the film, Bond must prevent a shady banker with terrorist ties from winning in a game of high stakes poker. As one might expect, life and death is on the line, making it a high stakes game indeed.

63/
Paramount Pictures

#39. Star Trek

Runtime: 127 min
Stacker score: 87
IMDb rating: 8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 94

Before giving the “Star Wars” franchise its due, director J.J. Abrams resurrected another classic space saga with 2009’s “Star Trek.” As a prequel to the original TV series and subsequent films, the movie portrays James T. Kirk (played by Chris Pine) as a brash young captain, who struggles to live up to his deceased father’s legacy. Actor Simon Pegg was so eager to star in the film as a young Scotty that he later claimed he would’ve paid Abrams for the part.

64/
Warner Bros.

#38. The Matrix

Runtime: 136 min
Stacker score: 87
IMDb rating: 8.7
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 87

Streamlining various mind-blowing ideas, “The Matrix” tells the story of a man who discovers reality is not what it seems. The wildly popular and influential flick debuted in 1999, and arguably changed the action genre overnight. Among the movie’s many famous scenes is a lobby shootout that took 10 days to film and didn’t rely on CGI

65/
Warner Bros.

#37. Inception

Runtime: 148 min
Stacker score: 87
IMDb rating: 8.8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 86

Christopher Nolan appears yet again on the list with 2010’s “Inception,” about a thief who enters people’s dreams in order to extract data or influence the dreamer. Nolan came up with the idea in the early 2000s, envisioning it as a horror flick and then a low budget drama before landing on this final, epic version.  

66/
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

#36. Forbidden Planet

Runtime: 98 min
Stacker score: 87.5
IMDb rating: 7.7
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 98

Loosely based on William Shakespeare’s “The Tempest,” 1956’s “Forbidden Planet” tells the story of a space crew who investigates the disappearance of a planet colony, discovering that one of the two sole survivors has a deadly secret. Test audiences were so impressed with early screenings of a rough cut that the studio released it as it was, meaning the film is technically unfinished to this day. Arguably more sci-fi than action, the movie nevertheless persists as a genuine classic, in part thanks to its groundbreaking score.

67/
Buster Keaton Productions

#35. The General

Runtime: 67 min
Stacker score: 87.5
IMDb rating: 8.2
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 93

Based on true events, Buster Keaton’s “The General” is a silent movie depicting a famous high-speed locomotive chase during the Civil War. The film’s most famous scene occurs when a bridge collapses, taking the train along with it. It was reportedly the most expensive scene of the silent era.

68/
Focus Features

#34. Kubo and the Two Strings

Runtime: 101 min
Stacker score: 87.5
IMDb rating: 7.8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 97

In the 2016 stop-motion animation feature “Kubo and the Two Strings,” a young boy named Kubo must find a magical coat of armor in order to defeat an evil spirit. The film comes to us from Studio Laika, the innovative, Oscar-nominated company behind movies like “Coraline” and “Boxtrolls.” 

 

69/
Marvel Studios

#33. Black Panther

Runtime: 134 min
Stacker score: 87.5
IMDb rating: 7.8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 97

Marvel’s “Black Panther” takes place in Wakanda, a technologically advanced African nation filled with highly skilled warriors, and home to a precious resource known as Vibranium. As Wakanda's throne is under attack by a skilled American soldier, it’s up to the heroic Black Panther to save the day. Headlining the film is Chadwick Boseman, who purposefully took on an African accent for the role.

70/
Columbia Pictures Corporation

#32. Ghost Busters

Runtime: 105 min
Stacker score: 87.5
IMDb rating: 7.8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 97

Films rarely get more iconic than 1984’s “Ghostbusters,” about a group of four men who make it their job to eliminate ghosts in New York City. Much of the movie’s enduring legacy is thanks to Bill Murray’s turn as Dr. Peter Venkman. The role was originally intended for John Belushi, who sadly passed away before filming began.

71/
Twentieth Century Fox

#31. Die Hard

Runtime: 132 min
Stacker score: 87.5
IMDb rating: 8.2
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 93

In 1988’s “Die Hard,” NYPD Officer John McClane (played by Bruce Willis) just wants to celebrate Christmas with his wife at her office party in Los Angeles, but soon finds himself squaring off against a team of international terrorists. The supremely popular film would spawn multiple sequels and help launch Bruce Willis’ career into the stratosphere. Fun fact: in Hungary, this film goes by the name “Give Your Life Expensive.”

72/
Argosy Pictures

#30. Fort Apache

Runtime: 128 min
Stacker score: 88
IMDb rating: 7.6
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 100

Directed by John Ford and starring Henry Fonda and John Wayne, 1948’s “Fort Apache” centers on the conflict between a disrespectful commander and his sensible subordinate at a cavalry outpost. Playing one of the main character’s daughters was former child star Shirley Temple, who was a full grown 19 by the time this movie was made.

73/
Warner Bros.

#29. Key Largo

Runtime: 100 min
Stacker score: 88
IMDb rating: 7.9
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 97

Upon visiting his old friend’s hotel, a man finds himself confronting vicious gangsters in 1948’s “Key Largo,” which stars Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall. Much of the action takes place during a hurricane, though the storm footage was borrowed from another film.

74/
Stanley Kramer Productions

#28. High Noon

Runtime: 85 min
Stacker score: 88
IMDb rating: 8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 96

A movie that takes place in “real time” before the concept even existed, 1952’s “High Noon” finds a town marshall in a sea of trouble, as he prepares for a showdown against ruthless gangsters. Distinguishing the work from other westerns is a main character who openly experiences doubts and fears. Such a candid display of emotions was a turn-off for some viewers at the time, John Wayne among them. In fact, Wayne later claimed that he made “Rio Bravo” in direct response to this film.

75/
Philip D'Antoni Productions

#27. The French Connection

Runtime: 104 min
Stacker score: 88
IMDb rating: 7.8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 98

Inspired by a real-life drug bust, 1971’s “The French Connection” tells the story of a disgruntled cop who takes down heroin dealers. Not only does the movie feature one of Hollywood’s most iconic car chase sequences, but it won five Oscars, including Best Picture.

76/
Warner Bros.

#26. The Iron Giant

Runtime: 86 min
Stacker score: 88
IMDb rating: 8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 96

Overlooked at the time of its 1999 release, Brad Bird’s “The Iron Giant” has since found a much wider audience, enduring as an animated classic. In the film, a young boy and his giant robot friend try to outmaneuver a paranoid government agent. The movie is based on a book by Ted Hughes, who liked the script, but sadly passed away before Bird’s adaptation appeared on the big screen.

77/
Universal International Pictures

#25. Winchester '73

Runtime: 92 min
Stacker score: 88.5
IMDb rating: 7.7
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 100

Taking its name to heart, 1950’s “Winchester ‘73” follows a rifle as it makes its way from one unlucky owner to the next. The film stars James Stewart, who surprised audiences with his harrowing performance. When the movie’s producers were initially unable to meet Stewart’s going salary rate, the actor agreed to take a cut of the film’s profits, resulting in one of Hollywood’s earliest back-end deals.

78/
Palomar Pictures

#24. The Taking of Pelham One Two Three

Runtime: 104 min
Stacker score: 88.5
IMDb rating: 7.7
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 100

Based on the novel by John Godey, 1974’s “The Taking of Pelham One Two Three” involves a group of men who hijack a subway car, and threaten to kill a passenger once every minute if the city of New York doesn’t meet their ransom demands. The film was remade twice with somewhat lackluster results, once in 1998, and then again in 2009.

79/
Renaissance Films

#23. Henry V

Runtime: 137 min
Stacker score: 88.5
IMDb rating: 7.7
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 100

Before directing movies like “Thor,” actor and filmmaker Kenneth Branagh was quite the Shakespeare enthusiast, as evidenced by his 1989 adaptation of “Henry V.” True to its acclaimed source material, the film follows a young King Henry V of England as he tries to conquer 15th century France during the Hundred Years War. Meanwhile, the original play and film adaptation alike are reportedly writte with at least a few inaccuracies

80/
Buster Keaton Productions

#22. Sherlock Jr.

Runtime: 45 min
Stacker score: 88.5
IMDb rating: 8.3
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 94

A film projectionist who dreams of being a detective has his amateur skills put to the test in Buster Keaton’s “Sherlock Jr.” Clocking in at just 45 minutes, the silent film is a resoundingly tight exercise in pacing and storytelling.

81/
Pixar Animation Studios

#21. The Incredibles

Runtime: 115 min
Stacker score: 88.5
IMDb rating: 8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 97

Written and directed by Brad Bird, Pixar’s “The Incredibles” follows two retired superheroes (and their children) as they try to live quiet lives in the suburbs. Naturally, it’s only a matter of time before the family is called into action, and they soon embark on a quest to save the world from the wrath of a disgruntled villain. Bird came up with the idea in the mid-90s while working at Warner Bros, originally fleshing his vision out using 2-D cel-animation. Some of those 2-D mock-ups appear during the film’s credit sequence.

82/
Warner Bros.

#20. Captain Blood

Runtime: 119 min
Stacker score: 89
IMDb rating: 7.8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 100

Legendary swashbuckler Errol Flynn headlines 1935’s “Captain Blood,” about a falsely convicted man exiled to the Caribbean, where he becomes a ruthless pirate. The film also features Michael Curtiz, who would co-star with Flynn in no less than 12 films, an impressive feat considering that that two actors reportedly didn’t get along.

83/
Universal Pictures

#19. Scarface

Runtime: 93 min
Stacker score: 89
IMDb rating: 7.8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 100

Most folks today might see the word “Scarface” and think of Brian De Palma’s ultraviolent gangster movie from 1983, but long before that there came this 1932 film of the same name. Co-directed by Howard Hawks, the movie follows the rise and fall of Tony Camonte, an ambitious gangster with an unquenchable thirst for power. Upon hearing of the film, real-life gangster Al Capone (who went by the nickname “Scarface”) was so disturbed by the potential references to his own legacy that he contacted Hawks to arrange for a private advance screening.

 

84/
Monterey Productions

#18. Red River

Runtime: 133 min
Stacker score: 89
IMDb rating: 7.8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 100

Another John Wayne classic, 1948’s “Red River” centers on a man named Thomas Dunson, who encounters a range of troubles as he herds 10,000 cattle to a market over 1000 miles away. This film ranks #5 on AFI’s list of the greatest westerns.

85/
Warner Bros.

#17. Mad Max: Fury Road

Runtime: 120 min
Stacker score: 89
IMDb rating: 8.1
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 97

Over 25 years after the first “Mad Max” came 2015’s “Mad Max: Fury Road.” Whereas the original was made on a shoestring budget of about $200,000, the fourth installment in the series cost a reported $150 million to produce. In the film, Mad Max (now played by Tom Hardy) teams up with a similarly rebellious woman named Furiosa as they flee from an evil overlord. Most of the filming went down in Africa’s Namib Desert, also known as “the land that God made in anger.”

86/
Carolco Pictures

#16. Terminator 2: Judgment Day

Runtime: 137 min
Stacker score: 89
IMDb rating: 8.5
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 93

A follow up to 1984 sci-fi cult classic “The Terminator,” 1991’s “Terminator 2: Judgement Day” was an absolute game-changer upon its release, thanks in part to some revolutionary special effects. In the film, two cyborgs are sent back from the future, one to kill and the other to protect. Playing the evil robot is actor Robert Patrick, though the role was originally supposed to go to rock star Billy Idol, who had to drop out after a motorcycle accident. 

87/
Warner Bros.

#15. The Roaring Twenties

Runtime: 106 min
Stacker score: 89.5
IMDb rating: 7.9
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 100

James Cagney and Humphrey Bogart co-star in 1939’s “The Roaring Twenties,” about two men who return from WWI and try to make ends meet during the Prohibition era. It was the last gangster role James Cagney would play for ten years.

88/
DreamWorks Animation

#14. How to Train Your Dragon

Runtime: 98 min
Stacker score: 89.5
IMDb rating: 8.1
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 98

It’s up to a young boy and his friendly dragon, Toothless, to end the ongoing rivalry between Vikings and dragons in 2010’s “How to Train Your Dragon” from Dreamworks Animation. In order to best depict Toothless as he soars through the air, animators were sent to “flight school” during production, where they studied the movements of various creatures in flight. 

 

89/
Paramount Pictures

#13. Raiders of the Lost Ark

Runtime: 115 min
Stacker score: 89.5
IMDb rating: 8.5
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 94

The Indiana Jones saga began in top form with Steven Spielberg’s “Raiders of the Lost Ark.” In the epic film, Jones embarks on a quest to find the Ark of the Covenant, battling all sorts of wily Nazis along the way. To open the film, Spielberg had the Paramount mountain logo dissolve into an actual mountain, which was something he came up with years ago as a young kid making movies with his friends.

90/
Lucasfilm Ltd.

#12. Star Wars

Runtime: 121 min
Stacker score: 89.5
IMDb rating: 8.6
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 93

Kicking off the franchise to which all others franchises aspire was George Lucas’ “Star Wars.” It debuted in 1977 and permanently changed Hollywood. The movie follows a young Luke Skywalker as he actualizes his potential and wages a battle against Darth Vader and the evil empire. Meanwhile, savvy linguists might have uncovered a major plot reveal as early as the first film, since Darth Vader loosely translates to “Dark Father.”

91/
Bustor Keaton Productions

#11. Steamboat Bill, Jr.

Runtime: 70 min
Stacker score: 90
IMDb rating: 8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 100

One of Buster Keaton’s last silent films, “Steamboat Bill, Jr.” tells the story of an ineffectual young man who joins his ill-tempered father’s riverboat crew. Featured in the film is one of Keaton’s most famous stunts. It occurs when a building facade crashes down on him, sparing his life by way of an open third-story window.

92/
Warner Bros.

#10. The Adventures of Robin Hood

Runtime: 102 min
Stacker score: 90
IMDb rating: 8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 100

Errol Flynn’s most iconic role was that of Robin Hood in 1938’s “The Adventures of Robin Hood,” in which the titular hero famously steals from the rich to give to the poor. It was Warner Bros.' most expensive film at the time, and the gamble paid off not once, but twice. Specifically, the film was a massive box office success upon its initial debut, and likewise a big hit after being re-released ten years later in technicolor.

93/
Warner Premiere

#9. Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Part 1

Runtime: 76 min
Stacker score: 90
IMDb rating: 8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 100

Batman emerges after ten years in hiding in the 2012 animated feature “Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Part 1.” Inspired directly by Frank Miller’s comic book series, the film delivers a brilliantly dark tone and plenty of nail-biting action.

94/
Warner Bros.

#8. Rio Bravo

Runtime: 141 min
Stacker score: 90
IMDb rating: 8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 100

In 1959’s “Rio Bravo,” a small town sheriff (played by John Wayne) enlists some unlikely help in order to keep a criminal’s next of kin behind bars. The movie is about as classic as a western can get. In fact, director Quentin Tarantino once claimed that he refuses to enter a relationship with a woman who doesn’t like this film.

95/
Hemdale

#7. The Terminator

Runtime: 107 min
Stacker score: 90
IMDb rating: 8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 100

1984’s “The Terminator” wasn’t director James Cameron’s first film, but if you ask him, he’ll say it was. Inspired by one of Cameron’s own nightmares, the movie stars action legend, Arnold Schwarzenegger, as a robot sent back in time to kill an important woman.

96/
DC Entertainment

#6. Batman: Under the Red Hood

Runtime: 75 min
Stacker score: 90.5
IMDb rating: 8.1
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 100

Another animated Batman feature, “Batman: Under the Red Hood” pits the caped crusader against an elusive and enigmatic vigilante. The story comes from a 1988 comic book installment called “A Death in the Family,” which had readers calling a 1-900 number to vote for whether the Robin character should be killed or spared.

 

97/
Warner Bros.

#5. White Heat

Runtime: 114 min
Stacker score: 91
IMDb rating: 8.2
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 100

A psychotic gangster with mommy issues sets the stage for 1949’s “White Heat,” which stars James Cagney in the lead role. The film’s prison scene was later used in Steve Martin’s “Dead Man Don’t Wear Plaid,” and parodied in “Naked Gun 331/3."

 

98/
DC Entertainment

#4. Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox

Runtime: 75 min
Stacker score: 91
IMDb rating: 8.2
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 100

Should direct-to-video comic book cartoons really count when compiling the world’s best action films? Probably not. Nevertheless, “Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox” comes in at #4. In the film, superhero The Flash finds himself in an alternate timeline, where he teams up with parallel versions of himself in order to fight his way home.

99/
Twentieth Century Fox

#3. Aliens

Runtime: 137 min
Stacker score: 91
IMDb rating: 8.4
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 98

1979’s “Alien” was an exercise in pure terror, while the 1986 follow up, “Aliens,” was much more of an action-packed affair. In the film, heroine Ripley (played by Sigourney Weaver) is enlisted to fight not just one, but numerous acid-spewing alien creatures that have taken over a space colony. To prepare for their roles as soldiers, some of the actors trained with real-life marines.

100/
Lucasfilm FILLER

#2. Star Wars: Episode V--The Empire Strikes Back

Runtime: 124 min
Stacker score: 91
IMDb rating: 8.8
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 94

Still considered the apex of the “Star Wars” franchise, “Star Wars: Episode V--The Empire Strikes Back” finds Luke Skywalker continuing to develop his powers, as the Empire makes significant moves against the rebels. Appearing in the franchise for the first time is the Emperor, a ghastly male character with pale skin and lighting blue eyes...at least that’s how he’s shown in the modified version. In the original version, the emperor was played by a female and given the eyes of a chimpanzee.

101/
Warner Bros.

#1. The Dark Knight

Runtime: 152 min
Stacker score: 92
IMDb rating: 9
Rotten Tomatoes rating: 94

Much more than comic book film or an action film, 2008’s “The Dark Knight” is considered by many to be one of the greatest movies ever made. That’s in no small part thanks to actor Heath Ledger’s turn as the Joker, who terrorizes Gotham City with a series of intricate and deadly stunts. Seeking inspiration for the character, Ledger kept a “Joker Diary,” which included clipped art and script notes. Sadly (and famously), the actor passed away before the movie debuted. 

2018 All rights reserved.