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Most popular brands in America

  • #90. Reese's Pieces

    - Positive opinion: 70%
    - Negative opinion: 9%
    - Neutral opinion: 17%
    - Have heard of brand: 97%

    Reese’s Pieces were introduced in 1978 to capitalize on the popularity of Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups. Sales soared after the sugar-coated candies appeared in the 1982 film “E.T the Extra-Terrestrial” as a sweet used to lure the tiny alien indoors.

  • #89. Tostitos

    - Positive opinion: 71%
    - Negative opinion: 6%
    - Neutral opinion: 21%
    - Have heard of brand: 97%

    Tostitos were introduced nationally in 1981 by Frito-Lay. The snack company has since come out with popular variations, including Tostitos Hint of Lime and Scoops!, which are designed for easy dipping.

  • #88. Ghirardelli

    - Positive opinion: 71%
    - Negative opinion: 3%
    - Neutral opinion: 15%
    - Have heard of brand: 88%

    In 1852, Domingo Ghirardelli opened a candy store in San Francisco that would grow into today’s Ghirardelli Chocolate Co., which makes an array of sweet confections. The waterfront Ghirardelli Square, which features restaurants and shops, became an official city landmark in 1965.

  • #87. Whirlpool

    - Positive opinion: 71%
    - Negative opinion: 3%
    - Neutral opinion: 22%
    - Have heard of brand: 95%

    Whirlpool founder Lou Upton bought the patent for a hand-washing machine from a failed business venture and in 1911, with his uncle Fred, patented a wringer washer driven by an electric motor. He and his family started the Upton Machine Co. to produce and sell the machines. The company made aircraft and tank parts during World War II, became Whirlpool Corp. in 1949, and developed food and waste management systems for U.S. space missions.

  • #86. Listerine

    - Positive opinion: 71%
    - Negative opinion: 5%
    - Neutral opinion: 21%
    - Have heard of brand: 96%

    Listerine is named after English physician Joseph Lister, who pioneered the use of antiseptic spray to sterilize surgical equipment and operating rooms. A marketing campaign in the 1920s using the word “halitosis” as a condition that the antiseptic product could treat proved enormously successful. The campaign became a textbook case for using low-level fear to sell products.

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  • #85. Breyers

    - Positive opinion: 71%
    - Negative opinion: 5%
    - Neutral opinion: 17%
    - Have heard of brand: 93%

    William Breyer started making ice cream in Philadelphia in 1866 and opened his first shop in 1882. The family company followed up in 1896 with its first wholesale manufacturing location. Unilever bought the ice cream business from Kraft in 1993.

  • #84. Chips Ahoy!

    - Positive opinion: 71%
    - Negative opinion: 8%
    - Neutral opinion: 19%
    - Have heard of brand: 98%

    Nabisco’s Chips Ahoy! cookies were introduced in 1963. The advertising campaign claimed their taste was as good as homemade. The name is a reference to the “Ships ahoy!” alert used by sailors.

  • #83. Google

    - Positive opinion: 71%
    - Negative opinion: 13%
    - Neutral opinion: 15%
    - Have heard of brand: 98%

    Two Stanford University students developed the search engine and patented the algorithm in 1998. It was originally named BackRub for its use of so-called back links on the World Wide Web, and the name Google comes from the word “googol”—the number 1 with 100 zeros after it. Google was first listed as a verb in 2006 in the Oxford English Dictionary.

  • #82. Butterfinger

    - Positive opinion: 71%
    - Negative opinion: 9%
    - Neutral opinion: 18%
    - Have heard of brand: 97%

    Italy’s Ferrero bought the Butterfinger brand from Nestle in 2018 and the following year changed the recipe to feature more cocoa and milk, higher quality peanuts, and less fat. Ferrero also owns the Ferrero Rocher, Nutella, and Tic Tac brands. Butterfinger is the favorite candy of cartoon character Bart Simpson, who appeared in its commercials saying: “Nobody better lay a finger on my Butterfinger.”

  • #81. Charmin

    - Positive opinion: 71%
    - Negative opinion: 6%
    - Neutral opinion: 20%
    - Have heard of brand: 97%

    Charmin was first produced in 1928 by the Hoberg Paper Co. in Green Bay, Wisconsin, and its name was based on the word “charming.” It became the Charmin Paper Co. and was acquired by Procter & Gamble in 1957. In 1964, the brand introduced the advertising character of Mr. Whipple, who would admonish store customers by saying: “Please don’t squeeze the Charmin.” The commercials ran for more than two decades.

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