Skip to main content

Main Area

Main

Cost of renting a luxurious apartment in 30 major cities

1/
PlusONE // shutterstock

Cost of renting a luxurious apartment in 30 major cities

Millennials have been blamed for killing everything from marmalade to Buffalo Wild Wings, but they’ve also had an undeniable hand in helping to revive America’s cities. Unlike earlier generations, whose visions of white picket fences and single-family homes led them to the suburbs, today’s 18- to 34-year-olds dream of living in the city. This process of re-urbanization has had mixed results—the trendy restaurants and burgeoning art scenes which often go along with inner-city revitalization have also had a gentrifying effect on neighborhoods, leading to displacement and rising rents. Millennials, in particular, are feeling the burden of those increases, which makes saving to buy a home much more difficult. As a result, home ownership rates among 25- to 34-year-olds are 8% lower than that of their parents. Millennials are a rental generation.

So what are they renting? For many, home is a luxury apartment. According to RentCafe, in 2017 luxury apartment complexes accounted for almost 80% of new apartment buildings. Based on data provided by RentCafe, Stacker has ranked the cost (from least to most expensive) of renting a luxury apartment in 30 major American cities. Average rents are given for high-end studios, one-, two-, and three-bedroom units, and the average for all high-end apartments. The 3-year percentage change is also noted.

Read on, and don’t let the word ‘luxury’ fool you. While rent may always be a doozy in the Big Apple, this list still manages a few surprises. Viva Las Vegas, anyone?

2/
B575 // Wikicommons

#30. El Paso, TX

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $976 (3-year percentage change: -1.3%)

Average rent for high-end studios: not available (3-year percentage change: not available)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $852 (3-year percentage change: 2.2%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $1,021 (3-year percentage change: -2.6%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $1,194 (3-year percentage change: -3.8%)

Perched on the edge of the U.S.-Mexico border, this Texas city of more than 680,000 people is the 20th largest in the United States. With a living wage of just $10.21 for a single adult, El Paso is relatively affordable for a city its size. The cost of high-end, multi-bedroom apartments has fallen markedly over the last three years, making the city on the Rio Grande a good bargain for renters.

3/
katsarecool // Wikicommons

#29. Oklahoma City, OK

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $1,024 (3-year percentage change: -0.9%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $872 (3-year percentage change: not available)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $926 (3-year percentage change: 1.6%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $1,102 (3-year percentage change: -2.7%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $1,295 (3-year percentage change: -1.1%)

This sprawling metropolis, larger in square miles (621) than almost any other city in the country, is well-known for its up-and-coming downtown and thriving sports culture. Journalist Sam Anderson, whose 2018 book “Boom Town” is as close as a city can get to a biography, calls it “one of the great weirdo cities in the world.” It’s also, incidentally, one of the more affordable.

4/
King of Hearts // Wikicommons

#28. Las Vegas, NV

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $1,102 (3-year percentage change: 18.4%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $838 (3-year percentage change: 19.9%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $970 (3-year percentage change: 19.9%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $1,145 (3-year percentage change: 18.8%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $1,322 (3-year percentage change: 18.2%)

From casinos and nightclubs to stage shows and all-you-can-eat buffets, Las Vegas doesn’t hide its excesses. But when it comes to the luxury apartments, this bustling city of more than 620,000 people plays its cards close to its chest. Few would guess that Sin City is also home to a surprisingly affordable luxury rental market.

5/
kelund // Flickr

#27. Louisville, KY

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $1,123 (3-year percentage change: 4.9%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $832 (3-year percentage change: 2.1%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $947 (3-year percentage change: 9.6%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $1,127 (3-year percentage change: 4.1%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $1,500 (3-year percentage change: 4.0%)

Home to the Kentucky Derby and the birthplace of boxing great Muhammad Ali, Kentucky’s largest city is also the 30th most populous in the nation. Sports aside, Louisville also boasts a great indie music scene and, of course, some pretty famous fried chicken.

6/
Riverratt3 // Flickr

#26. Memphis, TN

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $1,134 (3-year percentage change: 8.8%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $988 (3-year percentage change: not available)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $977 (3-year percentage change: 9.3%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $1,202 (3-year percentage change: 11.8%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $1,476 (3-year percentage change: 6.6%)

The largest city in West Tennessee, Memphis is associated with incredible food, a defining culture, and great tragedy. Icons like Elvis Presley, Aretha Franklin, and Otis Redding got their start recording at Sun Studios and Stax Records, and Beale Street is one of the capitals of blues, soul, and rock ‘n’ roll. Memphis is also where Martin Luther King Jr was assassinated. Today the city hosts the National Civil Rights Museum.

7/
Bravo1 // Wikcommons

#25. Phoenix, AZ

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $1,154 (3-year percentage change: 16.3%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $999 (3-year percentage change: 21.2%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $1,053 (3-year percentage change: 18.6%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $1,212 (3-year percentage change: 17.1%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $1,378 (3-year percentage change: 16.7%)

Though rarely thought of for its size, Phoenix is one of America’s largest cities with an estimated 2015 population of 1.56 million. The desert city was built atop an aquifer, which has allowed it to thrive and grow. Unfortunately, the depletion of groundwater is leading to another tricky issue: Parts of Phoenix are sinking.

8/
Jonathan Zander // Wikicommons

#24. Jacksonville, FL

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $1,173 (3-year percentage change: 12.9%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $1,010 (3-year percentage change: 9.9%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $1,029 (3-year percentage change: 14.8%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $1,230 (3-year percentage change: 12.2%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $1,434 (3-year percentage change: 12.5%)

Jacksonville may be the butt of many a joke, but that hasn’t stopped people from moving to the River City. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the Florida city saw its population grow by more than 11,000 people in 2017. That was the 13th largest increase among major American cities that year.

9/
Michael Barera // Wikicommons

#23. San Antonio, TX

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $1,176 (3-year percentage change: 5.4%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $1,029 (3-year percentage change: 11.2%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $1,007 (3-year percentage change: 7.0%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $1,275 (3-year percentage change: 5.8%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $1,537 (3-year percentage change: 2.1%)

Everything is bigger in Texas, including the cities. The state is home to four of the top-11 most populous in the country. With nearly 1.5 million residents, San Antonio—famous for the Spurs and the historic Alamo—is the seventh largest city in America. The average San Antonian spends around $3,000 per year on food; with all the amazing barbecue and Tex-Mex, not to mention the city’s burgeoning restaurant scene, it’s amazing they don’t spend more.  

10/
Alan Houser // Wikicommons

#22. Indianapolis, IN

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $1,191 (3-year percentage change: 11.3%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $1,137 (3-year percentage change: 13.2%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $1,056 (3-year percentage change: 9.8%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $1,233 (3-year percentage change: 11.3%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $1,394 (3-year percentage change: 8.1%)

Indiana’s largest city is best known for hosting the Indianapolis 500 every Memorial Day, which is the world’s largest one-day sporting event (attracting more than 300,000 fans). Indianapolis is also famous for its NFL franchise—the Colts—and has become a favorite destination for NCAA events like the Final Four. No wonder the city’s been nicknamed the “Amateur Sports Capital of the World!”

11/
Upstateherd // Wikicommons

#21. Charlotte, NC

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $1,247 (3-year percentage change: 11.0%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $1,157 (3-year percentage change: 8.6%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $1,116 (3-year percentage change: 12.8%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $1,305 (3-year percentage change: 12.4%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $1,455 (3-year percentage change: 10.4%)

Charlotte is one of the fastest growing cities in the country, having added more than 100,000 new residents between 2010 and 2017. The influx of talent has led to a growing economy, but Charlotte remains hugely unequal financially. The city is one of America’s banking capitals and also has an expanding tech industry.

12/
Grzegorczyk1 // Wikicommons

#20. Columbus, OH

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $1,319 (3-year percentage change: 10.0%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $992 (3-year percentage change: 2.5%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $1,147 (3-year percentage change: 10.5%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $1,412 (3-year percentage change: 5.9%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $2,047 (3-year percentage change: 9.5%)

Columbus may be known as the home of the Buckeyes, but it’s a lot more than just a college sports town. Last year, Forbes ranked it #7 on its annual Best Cities for Young Professionals, and it’s also where companies like Abercrombie & Fitch and Victoria’s Secret have chosen to put their headquarters.

13/
taedc // Wikicommons

#19. Dallas, TX

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $1,428 (3-year percentage change: 7.4%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $1,165 (3-year percentage change: 6.5%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $1,265 (3-year percentage change: 9.3%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $1,695 (3-year percentage change: 7.5%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $2,049 (3-year percentage change: 5.6%)

The popular image of Dallas is of a town overflowing with lavish oil wealth. But in reality, Dallas has become a Texas city famous for its green spaces and beautiful museums. And like any Texas metropolis, big-time sports are everywhere and the food can’t be missed.

14/
Stuart Seeger // Wikicommons

#18. Austin, TX

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $1,432 (3-year percentage change: 6.7%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $1,247 (3-year percentage change: 4.4%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $1,242 (3-year percentage change: 8.4%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $1,585 (3-year percentage change: 6.6%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $1,891 (3-year percentage change: 7.8%)

Austin has become a magnet for young professionals, with Forbes ranking it in 2016 as the fastest-growing city in America. Austin’s incredible food, beautiful nature, endless live music and festivals, and influx of tech companies are helping drive population growth, particularly by younger Texans who flock to the city.

15/
faungg // Flickr

#17. Houston, TX

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $1,448 (3-year percentage change: 1.8%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $1,229 (3-year percentage change: -6.0%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $1,278 (3-year percentage change: 1.3%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $1,647 (3-year percentage change: 2.6%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $1,848 (3-year percentage change: 4.3%)

With a population of 2.3 million people, Houston is Texas’ largest city, and the fourth largest in America. Its 621 square miles have made it a byword for sprawl, but in the last few years the city has begun significant investment in its busy downtown, building train lines and developing a bike-sharing network.

16/
texasbackroads // Flickr

#16. Nashville, TN

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $1,513 (3-year percentage change: 14.1%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $1,410 (3-year percentage change: 13.3%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $1,390 (3-year percentage change: 13.4%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $1,678 (3-year percentage change: 17.5%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $1,745 (3-year percentage change: 17.9%)

Nashville has long been defined by its history as the capital of country music, but a 10-minute drive from the Broadway’s crowded bars and live music venues reveals where the new Nashville is flourishing. East Nashville, home to Vanderbilt University, is brimming with restaurants, shops, and enough hipster coffee shops to make Brooklyn jealous. The city is surrounded by nature—good hiking is never far away.

17/
Andrew Jameson // Wikimedia Commons

#15. Detroit, MI

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $1,652 (3-year percentage change: 21.7%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $1,061 (3-year percentage change: 17.1%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $1,454 (3-year percentage change: 28.6%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $1,950 (3-year percentage change: 17.2%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $1,878 (3-year percentage change: 41.6%)

Once the epicenter of the American auto industry, Detroit bore the brunt of the 2008 recession and became a symbol of white flight and government mismanagement. During its heyday in the '60s, Detroit was home to two million residents. But the once vibrant and thriving city now comprises fewer than 700,000 people. It’s not all bad news though—young artists, activists, and immigrants are helping breathe new life into Motor City, and Detroit is slowly starting to make a comeback.

18/
Tony Webster // Wikicommons

#14. Portland, OR

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $1,691 (3-year percentage change: 9.0%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $1,378 (3-year percentage change: 2.2%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $1,583 (3-year percentage change: 8.0%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $1,921 (3-year percentage change: 16.5%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $1,950 (3-year percentage change: 18.5%)

Oregon’s largest city has a bit of a reputation as a hipster Mecca (a reputation which has been brilliantly lampooned by the series ”Portlandia”). The city overflows with incredible restaurants, beautiful parks, protected bike lanes, and a great music scene. The only drawback? Lots and lots of gray skies—Portland only averages 68 clear days per year.  

19/
Smallbones // Wikicommons

#13. Baltimore, MD

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $1,742 (3-year percentage change: 0.4%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $1,384 (3-year percentage change: -5.6%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $1,616 (3-year percentage change: -1.9%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $1,870 (3-year percentage change: 0.5%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $2,123 (3-year percentage change: 9.9%)

Cities don’t get to pick their cultural touchstones and that’s a shame for Baltimore, which is most closely associated with “The Wire” and “Serial.” But there’s more to the city than crime and bad policing. The beautiful old city on the harbor is a place worth exploring. Home to breweries, seafood, and a hipster-powered food scene, the town of Edgar Allan Poe is quickly changing into a vibrant city filled with art and culture.

20/
Jeffre Beall // Wikicommons

#12. Denver, CO

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $1,756 (3-year percentage change: 8.4%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $1,399 (3-year percentage change: 6.0%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $1,599 (3-year percentage change: 10.3%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $2,024 (3-year percentage change: 10.0%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $2,439 (3-year percentage change: 14.2%)

Situated a mile above sea level, Colorado’s capital is a paradise for nature lovers—as long as they can withstand the city’s harsh winters. Denver’s economy runs on aerospace, telecom, and tech; in the last decade, the city’s tech boom has resulted in an influx of young talent.

21/
Smallbones // Wikicommons

#11. Philadelphia, PA

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $2,197 (3-year percentage change: 8.2%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $1,623 (3-year percentage change: 16.8%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $1,956 (3-year percentage change: 7.3%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $2,582 (3-year percentage change: 11.1%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $3,677 (3-year percentage change: 10.5%)

“Rocky” and “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” have both cast Philly as a gritty, rugged East Coast metropolis. The Philadelphia Flyers' new mascot, named "Gritty," shows a further commitment to that image. But Philadelphia is also a city overflowing with incredible history, world-class museums, beautiful parks, and, of course, famous cheesesteaks. Note: it’s against the law not to run up the stairs of the Philadelphia Art Museum and do the Rocky pose at the top when in town.

22/
Joe Mabel // Wikicommons

#10. Seattle, WA

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $2,261 (3-year percentage change: 13.2%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $1,723 (3-year percentage change: 12.4%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $2,146 (3-year percentage change: 14.3%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $2,884 (3-year percentage change: 15.0%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $3,595 (3-year percentage change: 21.6%)

This beautiful northwest port city, home to the Space Needle and the Seahawks, has long been a tech hub. Home to Boeing, Microsoft, Amazon, and Starbucks, Seattle is a thriving mix of commerce, culture, coffee and, well, cloud-cover. Niche ranked it as one of the best cities in the country for those who love to be outdoors. There’s nature everywhere inside Seattle’s city limits, even in the heart of downtown, where Amazon just built three new domes housing tropical and rare plants.

23/
Payton Chung // Wikimedia Commons

#9. San Diego, CA

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $2,376 (3-year percentage change: 14.8%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $1,847 (3-year percentage change: 13.0%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $2,081 (3-year percentage change: 15.8%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $2,500 (3-year percentage change: 14.7%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $3,105 (3-year percentage change: 20.3%)

This sprawling coastal city an hour south of Los Angeles has incredible beaches, a world-famous zoo, and Legoland. The Ocean Beach and Pacific Beach neighborhoods, favorites of students and recent grads from UCSD and San Diego State University, are lively party neighborhoods. But there are also many beautiful quiet places to take in the California coastline, and the city is only 30 minutes from Tijuana, Mexico.

24/
Diego Delso // Wikicommons

#8. Chicago, IL

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $2,465 (3-year percentage change: 4.8%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $1,747 (3-year percentage change: 4.9%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $2,259 (3-year percentage change: 4.2%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $3,170 (3-year percentage change: 5.6%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $4,905 (3-year percentage change: 12.2%)

Chicago is the midwest’s crown jewel and America’s third-largest city, with a population of 2.7 million. The city is a cultural melting pot and locals enjoy an amazing variety of dining and entertainment options. Baseball and deep-dish reign supreme here, and the “second city” even has a beach (thanks to the magnificent Lake Michigan coastline). But be warned, winters in Chicago can be brutal.

25/
Agnosticpreacherskid // Wikicommons

#7. Washington D.C.

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $2,591 (3-year percentage change: 1.8%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $1,952 (3-year percentage change: 1.7%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $2,337 (3-year percentage change: 1.1%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $3,307 (3-year percentage change: 3.0%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $4,670 (3-year percentage change: 9.8%)

Washington D.C. is where government and history come together. Home to all three branches of government, hundreds of embassies, think tanks, and every type of lobbying firm imaginable, the city also features famous historical monuments and some of the most well-respected museums in the world, including the National Gallery of Art and the world-renowned Smithsonian Institution. A lively sports and dining scene make Washington, D.C. a popular, if somewhat expensive, choice for young professionals.

26/
Adam Schultz // Wikicommons

#6. San Jose, CA

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $2,849 (3-year percentage change: 8.7%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $2,262 (3-year percentage change: 9.8%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $2,536 (3-year percentage change: 8.5%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $3,090 (3-year percentage change: 11.1%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $3,716 (3-year percentage change: 8.4%)

Parked an hour south of San Francisco (depending on traffic), San Jose is Silicon Valley’s largest city, with a population of 1.02 million. The perk to being home to some of the most important companies in the history of the world is obvious—the city has developed an international reputation and was ranked the #3 Best Place to Live by US New & World Reports in 2017. But the influx of wealth hasn’t been entirely positive; gentrification has become a persistent problem in San Jose and the increase in housing prices has led to a rise in homelessness.

27/
sackerman519 // Flickr

#5. Los Angeles, CA

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $3,028 (3-year percentage change: 9.7%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $2,181 (3-year percentage change: 7.4%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $2,602 (3-year percentage change: 8.4%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $3,773 (3-year percentage change: 15.0%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $5,201 (3-year percentage change: 7.3%)

It’s home to Hollywood, incredible tacos, and some great desert hiking, but Los Angeles also has a reputation as the city with the worst traffic in America. Because LA covers 503 square miles and is home to almost 4 million people, it’s easier to tackle the city in parts, which can help cut down on dreaded car time. And it’s important to note that rent varies greatly in each smaller neighborhood within the behemoth.

28/
Adamsofen // Wikicommons

#4. Brooklyn, NY

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $3,285 (3-year percentage change: not available)

Average rent for high-end studios: $2,630 (3-year percentage change: not available)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $3,165 (3-year percentage change: not available)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $3,868 (3-year percentage change: not available

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $5,728 (3-year percentage change: not available)

To start to understand Brooklyn, it’s important to remember that the New York City borough is gigantic: It’s home to 2.6 million people (larger than every U.S. city except Chicago and Los Angeles). Known for its toughness, parts of the previously working-class borough have begun to morph into wealthy hipster neighborhoods. But again, Brooklyn is massive, and many parts of the borough have held onto their diverse, blue-collar roots—rent is not $3,000 per room everywhere in Brooklyn.

29/
Prayitno // Flickr

#3. Boston, MA

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $3,526 (3-year percentage change: 5.3%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $2,579 (3-year percentage change: 5.0%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $3,245 (3-year percentage change: 5.4%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $4,197 (3-year percentage change: 7.0%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $5,630 (3-year percentage change: 13.5%)

Boston is a city of contrasts. As one of America’s oldest cities, it embraces history and tradition, celebrates its wildly-successful local sports teams, and is staunchly and determinedly a working-class New England town at heart. At the same time, it’s home to institutions like Harvard and MIT, world-class universities which draw young talent and international faces to the city. A thriving culinary scene and bar culture help bring “town and gown” together.

30/
Sanfranman59 // Wikicommons

#2. San Francisco, CA

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $4,132 (3-year percentage change: 4.2%)

Average rent for high-end studios: $3,157 (3-year percentage change: 5.2%)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $3,709 (3-year percentage change: 4.1%)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $4,899 (3-year percentage change: 5.0%)

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $6,812 (3-year percentage change: -2.9%)

It’s not surprising that San Francisco is near the top of this list—there are few conversations in the city which don’t eventually pivot to complaints about the high cost of rent. Successive tech booms brought an influx of talented, highly educated, and newly wealthy workers to San Francisco, but unfortunately the 47.35-square-mile peninsula is not equipped to house everyone who wants to move in without forcing people out. As such, gentrification has hit the city hard, forcing many longtime residents to leave.

31/
Nmattson // Wikicommons

#1. New York NY

Average rent for all high-end apartments: $4,416 (3-year percentage change: not available)

Average rent for high-end studios: $3,179 (3-year percentage change: not available)

Average rent for high-end 1-BR apartments: $4,000 (3-year percentage change: not available)

Average rent for high-end 2-BR apartments: $5,911 (3-year percentage change: not available

Average rent for high-end 3-BR apartments: $8,163 (3-year percentage change: not available)

Speaking of crowded, New York City’s most famous borough packs 1.6 million people onto a tiny 22.7 square miles. The island is home to one of the world’s greatest city parks (Central Park), one of the world’s most recognizable skylines, and some of the world’s best food. New Yorkers are famous for their egos, but after spending some time in Manhattan, it makes sense why they’re so quick to say they live in the best city on earth. If you can make it in New York, you can make it anywhere, and if you can afford rent in Manhattan, you can probably afford rent anywhere as well.

2018 All rights reserved.