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Biggest box office bombs of all time

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Metro-Goldwyn-Mayor

Biggest box office bombs of all time

Making an expensive Hollywood movie is kind of like steering a gigantic cargo ship through a thunderstorm. On board are hundreds of crew members, with each one performing a specific function. At the vessel’s main helm are a handful of leaders, including the captain (the director), who may still be beholden to the powers that be. Like any crisis, tensions run high, and opinions can clash over what the best course of action may be. With so much turbulence afoot, and with so much at stake, it can seem like a miracle when the vessel arrives at its destination intact.

Stacker is honoring the occasions in which big-budget vehicles fail to deliver the goods—ranking the biggest box office bombs of all time. Using The Numbers as a data source, rankings were compiled based on box office earnings only, and do not incorporate video or other retail sales. Also note that only the first 1,000 movies with the highest reported budgets were considered for this story, and numbers have been adjusted for inflation.

Without further ado, here are the biggest box office bombs of all time—see if you can recall seeing any of them in theaters.

ALSO: Biggest box office winners of all time

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Paramount Pictures

#50. Event Horizon

Estimated loss: $52 million

Production budget: $94 million

Worldwide box office gross: $42 million

Release date: Aug. 15, 1997

“Event Horizon” genuinely terrified viewers upon its debut—and arguably continues to do so—but nevertheless failed to connect with a wider audience. In the film, a space vessel picks up some otherworldly inhabitants and violent terror ensues. It could be argued that the film is in fact too gory and subversive, and simply not worthy of its oversized budget. Or perhaps the critics are right, and the movie just isn’t that good. Not one to be deterred by a little financial failure, director Paul W.S. Anderson would go on to helm a number of successful and not so successful movies that similarly blended sci-fi and horror, including “Alien Vs. Predator” and “Resident Evil.”   


 

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Metro-Goldwyn-Mayor

#49. Windtalkers

Estimated loss: $52 million

Production budget: $160 million

Worldwide box office gross: $108 million

Release date: June 14, 2002

Legendary action director John Woo was riding high off the success of movies like “Mission Impossible II” and “Face/Off” when he reunited with actor Nicolas Cage for “Windtalkers.” Based on a true story, the film takes place during World War II, and centers on Windtalkers: Navajo marines who use their native language to speak in code to elude the enemy. Rather than explore the nuanced implications of the movie’s own premise, Woo stuck closely to what he knew best, and mostly just blew stuff up—and the movie bombed on an epic scale.  


 

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Summertime Entertainment

#48. Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return

Estimated loss: $53 million

Production budget: $74 million

Worldwide box office gross: $21 million

Release date: May 9, 2014

This computer-animated follow up to “The Wizard of Oz” was brought to audiences by Summertime Entertainment, representing the company’s first and last project. In the movie, Dorothy heads back to Oz, where she squares off against an evil jester. While the film’s paltry box office performance was bad news for investors, two of its producers reportedly walked away with a handsome profit, thanks to some shady fundraising practices.


 

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Legendary Entertainment

#47. Blackhat

Estimated loss: $53 million

Production budget: $74 million

Worldwide box office gross: $21 million

Release date: Jan. 16, 2015

After making a string of notable films in the mid-to-late 1990s, director Michael Mann’s output became uneven at best—culminating with this 2015 fiasco. The movie sees Chris Hemsworth tackling a global ring of cyberterrorists, and was bogged down by cheap-looking cinematography and a muddled storyline. As a result, most moviegoers didn’t show up to see “Blackhat,” and the ones that did were largely underwhelmed.

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20th Century Fox

#46. Flight of the Phoenix

Estimated loss: $54 million

Production budget: $99 million

Worldwide box office gross: $45 million

Release date: Dec. 17, 2004

After their plane crashes in the Mongolian desert, the survivors work on building a new plane from the wreckage in the 2004 remake of “Flight of the Phoenix.” Originally slated for release on a crowded Christmas lineup, the film was bumped up to Dec. 17—which did nothing to help its chances at the box office. Dennis Quaid, Tyrese Gibson, Giovanni Ribisi, and Hugh Laurie star. 

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Boll Kino Beteiligungs GmbH & Co. KG

#45. In the Name of the King: A Dungeon Siege Tale

Estimated loss: $54 million

Production budget: $70 million

Worldwide box office gross: $15 million

Release date: Jan. 11, 2008

“In the Name of the King: A Dungeon Siege Tale,” Jason Statham battles a bunch of animal-like warriors while rescuing his kidnapped wife and avenging the death of his son. Despite the film’s abysmal performance at the box office, Director Uwe Boll released a follow-up film in 2011.

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Universal Pictures

#44. R.I.P.D.

Estimated loss: $55 million

Production budget: $140 million

Worldwide box office gross: $85 million

Release date: July 19, 2013

Jeff Bridges and Ryan Reynolds might sound like a match made in Hollywood heaven, but the two actors simply couldn’t make 2013’s “R.I.P.D.” work. Based on a comic book, the film comes off as a poorly executed “Men in Black” imitation—with the walking undead substituted for aliens.

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Fox Animation Studio

#43. Titan A.E.

Estimated loss: $56 million

Production budget: $109 million

Worldwide box office gross: $53 million

Release date: June 16, 2000

Combining traditional animation with CGI, this 2000 film takes place in a distant future where Earth has been destroyed. A young man named Cale (voiced by Matt Damon) is threatened by killer aliens, so he must help locate an important spaceship—the Titan—before mankind perishes for good. The movie has a fairly strong fanbase to this day, but not enough to save it from tanking.

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Dreamworks

#42. The Last Castle

Estimated loss: $56 million

Production budget: $85 million

Worldwide box office gross: $29 million

Release date: Oct. 19, 2001

This 2001 thriller centers on a court-martialed general (Robert Redford), who leads a prison uprising against his captors. Overseeing the prison is a smug and unjust warden named Col. Winter, played by the late James Gandolfini at the height of his “Sopranos” fame. The movie initially cost $60 million—$85 million when adjusted for inflation—to produce, with $16 million going toward Redford and Gandolfini’s respective salaries.

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Electric Entertainment

#41. Flyboys

Estimated loss: $56 million

Production budget: $75 million

Worldwide box office gross: $18 million

Release date: Sept. 22, 2006

It might be called “Flyboys,” but this 2006 war movie never got off the ground. Set during WWI and based on a true story, the film follows a number of young Americans as they volunteer to fight on behalf of the French military—eventually forming a high-flying squadron known as the Lafayette Escadrille.

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Columbia Pictures Corporation

#40. All the King's Men

Estimated loss: $57 million

Production budget: $68 million

Worldwide box office gross: $12 million

Release date: Sept. 22, 2006

This 2006 remake of a previous Best Picture winner chronicles the political rise and fall of Willie Stark, whose character is loosely based on outspoken former Louisiana Gov. Huey Long. Unlike its 1949 predecessor (or the prestigious novel it was based on), this version was both a critical and commercial failure. Not even its cast of A-listers—including Sean Penn, Kate Winslet, and Anthony Hopkins—could save it. Adding insult to injury, the #1 movie the week this opened was “Jackass: Number Two.”

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Turner Pictures

#39. Gods and Generals

Estimated loss: $57 million

Production budget: $75 million

Worldwide box office gross: $18 million

Release date: Feb. 21, 2003

The story of Stonewall Jackson, a Confederate commander, leapt onto the big screen in 2003—and nobody seemed to care. Based on a book of the same name, “Gods and Generals” is a prequel to director Ron Maxwell’s 1993 effort, “Gettysburg.” Maxwell returned in 2013 with yet another Civil War-era picture, “Copperhead,” which barely registered at the box office.

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TriStar Entertainment

#38. The Fan

Estimated loss: $58 million

Production budget: $88 million

Worldwide box office gross: $30 million

Release date: Aug. 16, 1996

He might not be a big name these days, but in the mid-1990s, actor Wesley Snipes was certifiable A-list talent. Big names like Robert De Niro and director Tony Scott were also on the roster of this 1996 flop, which tells the tale of a salesman (De Niro) who becomes obsessed with a professional baseball player (Snipes).

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CJ Entertainment

#37. The Adventures of Rocky & Bullwinkle

Estimated loss: $59 million

Production budget: $111 million

Worldwide box office gross: $51 million

Release date: June 30, 2000

Turning a beloved children’s cartoon into a feature film might have seemed like a great idea to Hollywood executives—including Robert DeNiro, who starred as well, but this turkey from 2000 proved to be an adaptation that few people were asking requesting. Like a low-budget follow-up to “Who Framed Roger Rabbit?” this embarrassingly bad film mixes animation and live action for an effect that was campy at best.

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Franchise Pictures

#36. 3000 Miles to Graceland

Estimated loss: $61 million

Production budget: $88 million

Worldwide box office gross: $26 million

Release date: Feb. 23, 2001

When it comes to this 2001 clunker, the shocking news isn’t that it bombed—it’s that it cost so much to make in the first place. As it turns out, however, over $12 million of the movie’s supposed budget went straight into an executive’s pocket, prompting one of the financiers to sue. The film is about a group of criminals who rob a casino during Elvis impersonation week, and then turn on one another. Its cast includes Kurt Russell, Kevin Costner, Courteney Cox, and Christian Slater, among numerous others.


 

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Atlas Entertainment

#35. Rollerball

Estimated loss: $61 million

Production budget: $97 million

Worldwide box office gross: $36 million

Release date: Feb. 8, 2002

1975’s “Rollerball” is a dystopian film that takes swipes at an omnipresent corporate culture, yet its 2002 remake has the hallmarks of Hollywood money-grab. Drained of any social commentary, the plodding film takes place in present-day and centers on a violent, imaginary sport. And this time around, its critics were taking the harshest swipes.

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Universal Pictures

#34. Meet Joe Black

Estimated loss: $62 million

Production budget: $131 million

Worldwide box office gross: $69 million

Release date: Nov. 13, 1998

Director Martin Brest was coming off the success of “Scent of a Woman” when he helmed this 1998 melodrama, in which a personified Death walks among the living in the form of a man named Joe Black (Brad Pitt). With a rich media magnate (Anthony Hopkins) as his guide, Death learns about life and even falls in love with a woman. A remake of 1939’s “Death Takes a Holiday,” the film used a large percentage of its budget to depict the extravagant lifestyle of its wealthy characters. If Brest thought things would pick up for him with his next project, he was dead wrong: his next project was “Gigli,” which took the word “turkey” to another level.  

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Miramax

#33. The Great Raid

Estimated loss: $63 million

Production budget: $77 million

Worldwide box office gross: $14 million

Release date: Aug. 12, 2005

Set during WWII, “The Great Raid” sees members of the 6th Ranger Battalion embarking on a seemingly impossible mission to rescue over 500 POWs from a Japanese camp. The film—which is based on actual events—was originally slated for a 2003 release, but due to numerous delays, it didn’t see the light of day until 2005. It opened to lukewarm reviews and little fanfare.

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Warner Bros.

#32. Wyatt Earp

Estimated loss: $64 million

Production budget: $106 million

Worldwide box office gross: $42 million

Release date: June 24, 1994

Less than a year after “Tombstone” wowed audiences with its compelling characters and epic gun battles, there came this 1994 biopic, starring Kevin Costner as Wyatt Earp. Clocking in at over three hours, the film cost more than twice as much as “Tombstone” to make, and earned about half as much domestically. Meanwhile, its failure was a mere appetizer for Costner, as you’ll see later in the list.

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Nickelodeon Movies

#31. Monster Trucks

Estimated loss: $65 million

Production budget: $128 million

Worldwide box office gross: $63 million

Release date: Jan. 13, 2017

Representing Paramount Animation’s first live-action film, and 2017’s first major flop, “Monster Trucks” chronicles the adventures of a young boy and his oil-eating creature friend. Long before the movie was released, early reactions to the trailer ranged from muted to scathing—the outlook was so grim that Paramount’s parent company, Viacom, declared the film as a write-down before it even premiered.

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Metro-Goldwyn-Mayor

#30. Supernova

Estimated loss: $66 million

Production budget: $87 million

Worldwide box office gross: $22 million

Release date: Jan. 14, 2000

In this sci-fi thriller, the six-member crew aboard a deep-space hospital ship brings aboard a young man and an alien artifact, and soon finds itself under attack. The movie encountered numerous obstacles during development and production while its budget continued to balloon. After countless hirings, firings, disputes, and negative test screenings, a barely watchable final product landed in theaters—losing about $66 million.

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Mandalay Pictures

#29. Beyond Borders

Estimated loss: $66 million

Production budget: $82 million

Worldwide box office gross: $16 million

Release date: Oct. 24, 2003

In Angelina Jolie’s first passion project, she and Clive Owen forge a romance while visiting a variety of war-torn nations. Oliver Stone was initially attached to direct, but he ended up dropping out due to production and budget issues, leaving the project in the hands of director Martin Campbell. Despite the film’s horrendous reviews and anemic earnings, Jolie would continue to explore similar terrain in her later work.

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Universal Pictures

#28. Virus

Estimated loss: $67 million

Production budget: $113 million

Worldwide box office gross: $46 million

Release date: Jan. 15, 1999

After boarding a Russian space vessel, members of an American crew come face to face with a deadly alien in this box office fiasco from 1999. Most of the production budget presumably went toward special effects, and critics were accordingly impressed with the movie’s visual aesthetic. There was just one problem: The filmmakers forgot to include an original or compelling story.

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Warner Bros.

#27. Red Planet

Estimated loss: $68 million

Production budget: $116 million

Worldwide box office gross: $49 million

Release date: Nov. 10, 2000

While a movie about terraforming Mars might seem prescient in retrospect, “Red Planet” is mostly just a failed sci-fi thriller. In the film, Val Kilmer partakes in the first manned expedition to Mars, where he and his fellow astronauts encounter a range of deadly obstacles. After tanking on both the domestic and international front, the movie earned itself the nickname of “Dead Planet.”   

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Metro-Goldwyn-Mayor

#26. Turbulence

Estimated loss: $68 million

Production budget: $86 million

Worldwide box office gross: $18 million

Release date: Jan. 10, 1997

The mid-1990s might have been kind to plane-based action movies like “Executive Decision,” “Con-Air,” and “Air Force One,” but not so much to this 1997 thriller, in which a serial killer (Ray Liotta) wreaks havoc aboard a 747. The poster art asks potential viewers: “Can you survive the ride?” 

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Paramount Pictures

#25. Timeline

Estimated loss: $73 million

Production budget: $109 million

Worldwide box office gross: $36 million

Release date: Nov. 26, 2003

Adapted from the best-selling novel by Michael Crichton, this 2003 adventure flick follows a group of archaeologists as they travel back in time to 14th-century France. The film might have cost $80 million to produce—$109 million when adjusted for inflation, but critics felt it looked downright cheap, That’s without mentioning its muddled plot, poor writing, cheesy tone, and stiff acting. Audiences weren’t too excited about it either.

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Warner Bros.

#24. Battlefield Earth: A Saga of the Year 3000

Estimated loss: $73 million

Production budget: $116 million

Worldwide box office gross: $43 million

Release date: May 12, 2000

More than a mere box office bomb, “Battlefield Earth: A Saga of the Year 3000” is one of the most ridiculed flops of all time. Look no further than its IMDb rating of 2.4, or its Rotten Tomatoes score of just 3% as proof. This big budget sci-fi thriller—which depicts the future rebellion of mankind against alien overlords (aka Psychlos)—is penned by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard. Flaunting long dreadlocks and bad teeth, John Travolta plays a Psychlo named Terl. Travolta, a devout Scientologist, was a producer on the film as well.

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Chris Lee Productions

#23. Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within

Estimated loss: $73 million

Production budget: $194 million

Worldwide box office gross: $120 million

Release date: July 11, 2001

When making an expensive film based on a video game, it's probably wise to avoid discarding the elements that made the game such a big hit in the first place. But that’s what this 2001 movie did, and the result was an epic financial disaster. Much of the film’s budget went toward employing photorealistic computer animation, quite groundbreaking for its time and a primary selling-point, but it fell flat with audiences and critics.

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Caravan Pictures

#22. Holy Man

Estimated loss: $74 million

Production budget: $92 million

Worldwide box office gross: $19 million

Release date: Oct. 9, 1998

In this 1998 misfire, Eddie Murphy plays a spiritual man named G, whose over-the-top personality helps a TV shopping network achieve meteoric success. Murphy was certifiable box office gold throughout the 1980s and 1990s, but the magic was starting to fade—four years later, he would headline “The Adventures of Pluto Nash,” another notorious bomb.


 

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Warner Bros.

#21. Father's Day

Estimated loss: $77 million

Production budget: $133 million

Worldwide box office gross: $56 million

Release date: May 9, 1997

Starring Robin Williams and Billy Crystal at the height of their respective careers, and directed by comedy veteran Ivan Reitman, Warner Brothers had high expectations for “Father’s Day.” However, Premiere magazine quoted a Warner Bros. insider saying: "When we saw the movie, it took the wind out of us." Meanwhile, this film was just one among a number of major disappointments for the studio that year.

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British Broadcast Corporation

#20. Hard Rain

Estimated loss: $77 million

Production budget: $108 million

Worldwide box office gross: $31 million

Release date: Jan. 16, 1998

This 1998 actioner ups the stakes by pitting an armored truck driver (Christian Slater) against a gang of thieves (led by Morgan Freeman) during a catastrophic rainstorm. A disaster film in every sense, “Hard Rain” was plagued by all sorts of problems during filming and in post-production. After a series of re-shoots and delays, the movie came out right around the same time that Slater was dealing with a major scandal involving drug abuse and violent behavior. Between that and the negative reviews, it was dead on arrival.

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Franchise Pictures

#19. Ballistic: Ecks vs. Sever

Estimated loss: $78 million

Production budget: $97 million

Worldwide box office gross: $20 million

Release date: Sept. 20, 2002

A skilled FBI agent (Antonio Banderas) must team up with his mortal enemy (Lucy Liu) in order to take down a common enemy in this 2002 clunker. The title is a mouthful while the film itself is just plain annoying. More than just a huge box office bomb, it holds the distinction of having a 0% Rotten Tomatoes score.

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New Line Cinema

#18. Last Man Standing

Estimated loss: $78 million

Production budget: $107 million

Worldwide box office gross: $29 million

Release date: Sept. 20, 1996

Gritty director Walter Hill and occasionally gritty actor Bruce Willis teamed up for this remake of Akira Kurosawa’s “Yojimbo”—a movie that also reportedly inspired 1964’s “A Fistful of Dollars.” Willis plays a drifter who’s caught in the middle of a war between Irish and Italian gangsters; violence and sarcastic remarks ensue. However, it wasn’t enough to draw audience numbers—it tanked on a disastrous level.

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Columbia Pictures Corporation

#17. Stealth

Estimated loss: $79 million

Production budget: $177 million

Worldwide box office gross: $98 million

Release date: July 29, 2005

An action-movie veteran with four decades of experience under his belt, director Rob Cohen has run the full gamut in terms of quality, though the majority of his films are considered pretty bad. Meanwhile, this 2005 atrocity remains his biggest bomb to date. In the movie, three pilots struggle to contain an artificial intelligence program before it kicks off a world war; Jessica Biel and Jamie Foxx star.

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Warner Bros.

#16. Osmosis Jones

Estimated loss: $80 million

Production budget: $99 million

Worldwide box office gross: $19 million

Release date: Aug. 10, 2001

Decades before Pixar’s “Inside Out” took viewers inside the human brain, this 2001 animated flick explored the wonders of the human body—a zookeeper named Frank’s body to be exact. By swallowing a contaminated egg, Frank unleashes a deadly virus that has the potential to destroy him from the inside out. It’s up to a white blood cell named Osmosis Jones to save the day—with help from a cold pill, of course. Directed by gross-out kings the Farrelly Brothers, and featuring voices from a range of comedic talent, the movie kept things strictly PG—and appealed to essentially no one as a result. 

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HCC Media Group

#15. The Nutcracker in 3D

Estimated loss: $80 million

Production budget: $103 million

Worldwide box office gross: $24 million

Release date: Nov. 24, 2010

Financed primarily by Russian bankers, though filmed in English, this 2010 film barely penetrated the U.S. market and earned just $13.9 million in Russia. Consequently, the investors reportedly lost up to 90% of their backing. Tchaikovsky’s masterful ballet will live on, but this poorly received adaptation has already been forgotten.

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Paramount Pictures

#14. Lucky Numbers

Estimated loss: $80 million

Production budget: $95 million

Worldwide box office gross: $15 million

Release date: Oct. 27, 2000

“Lucky Numbers” proved to be anything but lucky once its numbers came in. Directed by Nora Ephron of “Sleepless in Seattle” fame, the comedy follows a down-and-out weatherman (John Travolta) as he engages in a lottery scheme. Why the movie cost so much to make is anyone’s guess, but it came out the same year as “Battlefield Earth;” the year 2000 was simply not a good one for John Travolta.  

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Columbia Pictures Corporation

#13. How Do You Know?

Estimated loss: $81 million

Production budget: $138 million

Worldwide box office gross: $57 million

Release date: Dec. 17, 2010

As the man behind shows like “The Simpsons” and movies like “Broadcast News,” James L. Brooks is responsible for some of Hollywood’s finest offerings. This 2010 comedy-drama is not one of them. Starring Reese Witherspoon, Owen Wilson, Jack Nicholson, and Paul Rudd, the movie finds its protagonist (Witherspoon) in the middle of a light-hearted love triangle. Apparently, Brooks decided to reshoot the beginning and end after completing the film, thereby inflating its already outrageous budget. Meanwhile, the lead actors earned a combined payday of $50 million, which didn’t help the bottom line either.

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Survival Pictures

#12. The Promise

Estimated loss: $81 million

Production budget: $92 million

Worldwide box office gross: $11 million

Release date: April 21, 2017

Billionaire Kirk Kerkorian was eager to see a big-budget movie about the Armenian genocide of 1915, so he paid for most of it himself. The result was this 2017 historical drama, which completely floundered at the box office. That’s in part due to some aggressive opposition from the Turkish government, though lukewarm critical reception certainly didn’t help. Adding to its tragedy, Kerkorian passed away before production of the film began.  

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TriStar Pictures

#11. Hudson Hawk

Estimated loss: $88 million

Production budget: $120 million

Worldwide box office gross: $32 million

Release date: May 24, 1991

Every decade seems to have its signature flop, and for the 1990s, it was “Hudson Hawk.” In the film, a cat burglar is blackmailed into stealing a precious work of art, while eluding the wrath of various cartoon-like characters. Bruce Willis didn’t just play the lead role, he helped come up with the initial story.

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Touchstone Pictures

#10. The Alamo

Estimated loss: $90 million

Production budget: $122 million

Worldwide box office gross: $32 million

Release date: April 9, 2004

What began as a project intended for Ron Howard, ended up in the hands of John Lee Hancock, and things only got worse from there. True to its name, the movie depicts the famous 1836 showdown, where Davy Crockett (Billy Bob Thornton) and James Bowie (Jason Patric) helped a relatively small group of Texans and Tejano men fend off a Mexican army of more than 2,000 soldiers. The battle might have been victorious, but the film was an outright failure for Disney.

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Warner Bros.

#9. The Postman

Estimated loss: $92 million

Production budget: $125 million

Worldwide box office gross: $33 million

Release date: Dec. 25, 1997

One might hear the words “Kevin Costner flop” and think of movies like “Waterworld,” but “The Postman” remains his biggest box office bomb. Costner both directed and starred in the film, which takes place in a post-apocalyptic America, and follows a self-made postman as he delivers mail. If you’re not intrigued, neither were movie crowds—it failed abysmally.

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Warner Bros.

#8. Soldier

Estimated loss: $93 million

Production budget: $115 million

Worldwide box office gross: $22 million

Release date: Oct. 23, 1998

Another dud from Paul W.S. Anderson, this 1998 movie takes place in a future society where soldiers are trained from birth. One of those soldiers is Kurt Russell, who’s left for dead on a distant planet and is eventually tasked with fighting off a new breed of trained killers. The film mostly comes across as a knock-off of “Universal Soldier.

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Franchise Pictures

#7. A Sound of Thunder

Estimated loss: $95 million

Production budget: $103 million

Worldwide box office gross: $8 million

Release date: Sept. 2, 2005

Adapting a classic short story by Ray Bradbury, this 2005 sci-fi film explores the unintended effects of time travel. Specifically, the movie features a scientist who travels back in time to the dinosaur era, strays off the designated path, and ends up changing history in catastrophic ways. “The Simpsons” tackled the very same premise in a “Treehouse of Horror” segment.

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Touchstone Pictures

#6. The 13th Warrior

Estimated loss: $95 million

Production budget: $188 million

Worldwide box office gross: $93 million

Release date: Aug. 27, 1999

Originally going by “Eaters of the Dead”—the title of the Michael Crichton novel upon which it was based, this John McTiernan film underwent drastic re-edits and a name change before arriving in theaters. Such significant restructuring only added to the movie’s already bloated production costs and subsequent losses. In the film, Antonio Banderas plays a prophesied warrior who helps a clan of Vikings fend off an enemy threat.


 

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Twentieth Century Fox

#5. Monkeybone

Estimated loss: $98 million

Production budget: $106 million

Worldwide box office gross: $8 million

Release date: Feb. 23, 2001

According to actress Rose McGowan, “Monkeybone” could have been an incredible movie, had Fox Studios not fired the original director, Henry Selick. Instead, the film—about a cartoonist (Brendan Fraser) who gets trapped in a world of his own creation—remains one of the biggest flops of all time.

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Carolco Pictures

#4. Cutthroat Island

Estimated loss: $121 million

Production budget: $151 million

Worldwide box office gross: $30 million

Release date: Dec. 22, 1995

Geena Davis and Matthew Modine are a pair of pirates in this legendary turkey from Davis’ then-husband, Renny Harlin. In later interviews, Harlin blames part of the film’s failure on production company Carolco, which was going under at the time. Another element in the film’s demise? Harlin’s own hubris in the wake of successful efforts like “Die Hard 2” and “Cliffhanger.” A handful of poor casting choices didn’t help either. Consequently, “Cutthroat Island” went down like a hole-ridden ship, and became the biggest money loser of its time.  

49/
Walt Disney Pictures

#3. Mars Needs Moms

Estimated loss: $123 million

Production budget: $167 million

Worldwide box office gross: $44 million

Release date: March 11, 2011

This already-forgotten Disney film, which cost over $150 million to make, earned just over $6 million its opening weekend. Produced by Robert Zemeckis, the film employs motion-capture animation, giving it an off-putting aesthetic. Whatever the reason, the stink on this one was so powerful that Disney removed the word “Mars” from an upcoming film title just to avoid conjuring associations. That film was “John Carter,” which tanked anyway.

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Castle Rock Entertainment

#2. The Adventures of Pluto Nash

Estimated loss: $129 million

Production budget: $139 million

Worldwide box office gross: $10 million

Release date: Aug. 16, 2002

After spending nearly two decades in development, “The Adventures of Pluto Nash” finally arrived in theaters in 2002—and swiftly became one of the most famous duds of the modern era. Starring Eddie Murphy as a lunar nightclub owner in the year 2087, the film went big on camp and short on laughs—a significant drop in quality when compared to the actor’s better films. Murphy later said in an interview: “I know two or three people that liked this movie.”

51/
New Line Cinema

#1. Town & Country

Estimated loss: $134 million

Production budget: $149 million

Worldwide box office gross: $15 million

Release date: April 27, 2001

In a textbook case of moviemaking gone awry, this 2001 disaster reportedly started with a production budget of around $14 million, which climbed to $40 million after a number of big names, namely Diane Keaton, Garry Shandling, Goldie Hawn, and Warren Beatty, joined the cast. The costs only escalated from there, and that was before the extensive reshoots in the wake of negative test screenings. Ultimately, it would take three years for the movie—about the farcical exploits of an architect (Beatty)—to arrive on the big screen, where it went down in flames.

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