Skip to main content

Main Area

Main

Worst thrillers in movie history

  • Worst thrillers in movie history

    For every yin there is a yang, and for every cinematic masterpiece there’s a bona fide turkey waiting in the wings. The thriller genre is naturally no exception, with its fair share of clunkers, fiascos, and failures. Indeed, while a great thriller can get the adrenaline pumping by way of gripping plot twists and palpable human conflict, a terrible one will plod along in a sea of confusion and bad acting. Of course, every now and then a schlocky thriller might earn itself a healthy cult following among lovers of trash cinema, but for the most part these famously bad movies just plain stink.

    It’s in honor of Hollywood misfires that Stacker brings you the worst thrillers in movie history. On this list, you’ll find everything from misguided sequels, to poorly made adaptations, to good ideas that ended up in the wrong hands, and bad ideas that never should have produced in the first place. Some titles will probably surprise you—especially since you might not consider them to be thrillers in the technical sense—but if it’s good enough to get the thriller tag on IMDb (along with a garbage rating) it’s good enough for us to include.

    In order to determine the worst of the worst, Stacker built an index (the “Stacker score”) using IMDb ratings (weighted 50%) and the Rotten Tomatoes Tomatometer (weighted 50%). We get started with some relatively passable entries and then count down to the gravest offenders. To keep things in familiar territory, we focused on films that had at least 20,000 votes on IMDb. Read on to see which pic blew through an absurd amount of gasoline and be reminded of a time when Dennis Rodman was considered a worthwhile casting choice.

     

  • #100. Bad Company

    Year: 2002

    Stacker score: 33

    IMDb rating: 5.6

    Tomatometer: 10%

    The pairing of comedian Chris Rock and thespian Anthony Hopkins might have sounded like a good idea in the early 2000s, but as Joel Schumacher’s Bad Company goes to show, it takes more than good intentions to make a good movie. In the film, Rock plays a man who’s recruited by the C.I.A to replace his recently deceased twin brother. Fun fact: this film was originally conceived as a sequel to 1999’s Blue Streak, starring Martin Lawrence.

  • #99. Hitman: Agent 47

    Year: 2015

    Stacker score: 33

    IMDb rating: 5.7

    Tomatometer: 9%

    In Hitman: Agent 47, a genetically engineered assassin teams up with a woman to help find her father, uncovering secrets about his own past along the way. Based on a video game, the movie was originally supposed to star Paul Walker in the lead role. Sadly, that didn’t pan out after the actor passed away in an unexpected car accident.

  • #98. Sinister 2

    Year: 2015

    Stacker score: 33

    IMDb rating: 5.3

    Tomatometer: 13%

    After moving into a new house, a mother and her twin sons find themselves in a demon’s crosshairs in Sinister 2. The film did its best to offer authentic scares, frequently employing practical effects over CGI. However, it was far from enough to get the stink off this one.

  • #97. Dracula 2000

    Year: 2000

    Stacker score: 33

    IMDb rating: 4.9

    Tomatometer: 17%

    Dracula is back and badder than ever in Dracula 2000, and unfortunately we mean “badder than ever” in the most literal sense. The film stars Gerard Butler as the famous nocturnal count, who’s unwittingly unleashed by a small team of thieves. Pure mediocrity ensues.

  • #96. The Haunting

    Year: 1999

    Stacker score: 32.5

    IMDb rating: 4.9

    Tomatometer: 16%

    The last thing the horror/thriller genre ever needs is another haunted house movie, making redundancy the first of The Haunting’s many blatant offenses. In the film, a small group of people visit a creepy mansion and blah, blah, blah, blah. Easy insults aside, the movie did perform admirably at the box office. Plus, Hollywood has produced far worse.

  • #95. Survivor

    Year: 2015

    Stacker score: 32.5

    IMDb rating: 5.6

    Tomatometer: 9%

    Milla Jovovich and Pierce Brosnan co-star in 2015’s Survivor, about a British Foreign Service Officer who gets framed for a crime she didn’t commit while trying to prevent an attack on New York City. The movie made so little on its $20 million budget that box office numbers weren’t even tallied. In fact, Box Office Mojo still thinks this movie hasn’t been released yet.

  • #94. Killing Season

    Year: 2013

    Stacker score: 32.5

    IMDb rating: 5.4

    Tomatometer: 11%

    One might see the names Robert De Niro and John Travolta and ask him or herself how 2013’s Killing Season slipped under his or her radar. Then that same person might watch the film--about two Bosnian War veterans who form an unlikely bond--and realize that some things are best left undiscovered.

  • #93. The Skulls

    Year: 2000

    Stacker score: 32.5

    IMDb rating: 5.6

    Tomatometer: 9%

    2000 flick The Skulls is about a group of over-privileged white kids who join a secret college fraternity, and suddenly find themselves in the midst of danger. The story is loosely inspired by Yale’s Skull and Bones Society, which includes members of the Bush family and apparently owns a collection of literal, historically relevant human skulls.

  • #92. Beverly Hills Cop III

    Year: 1994

    Stacker score: 32.5

    IMDb rating: 5.5

    Tomatometer: 10%

    While Beverly Hills Cop III marked an indisputable low point in the Beverly Hills Cop franchise, it’s tough to include the movie on a list that also features names like Uwe Boll. After all, the film--which sees legendary cop Axel Foley (played by Eddie Murphy) investigating a car theft ring--is more of a major disappointment than it is an outright terrible movie. That said, sometimes major disappointments hurt even more than expected duds.

  • #91. Cyborg

    Year: 1989

    Stacker score: 32

    IMDb rating: 5

    Tomatometer: 14%

    Jean-Claude Van Damme was in the early stages of super-stardom when he made 1989’s Cyborg, about a martial artist who tracks a sadistic killer against a dystopian backdrop. The film was made for an estimated half million dollars, thereby scoring big time at the box office and further propelling Van Damme’s career. A few years later, the actor would appear in Universal Soldier, which touted a similar premise and much bigger budget.

2018 All rights reserved.