Skip to main content

Main Area

Main

Most popular brands in America

  • #20. Kit Kat

    - Positive opinion: 79%
    - Negative opinion: 5%
    - Neutral opinion: 14%
    - Have heard of brand: 98%

    Britain’s Rowntree’s of York, owned by Nestle, invented Kit Kat bars and started selling them in 1935. Nestle makes and sells Kit Kats in 16 countries, while Hershey’s H.B. Reese division manufactures the chocolate-covered bars in the United States.

  • #19. UPS

    - Positive opinion: 79%
    - Negative opinion: 4%
    - Neutral opinion: 16%
    - Have heard of brand: 98%

    UPS delivers 5.5 billion packages a year and last year had $74 billion in revenues. It changed its name to UPS from United Parcel Service in 2003. The company has a fleet of 267 planes.

  • #18. Bounty

    - Positive opinion: 79%
    - Negative opinion: 3%
    - Neutral opinion: 17%
    - Have heard of brand: 98%

    Procter & Gamble put in eight years of research before coming out with its Bounty paper towels in 1965. The two-ply towels were marked for their absorbency. For several years the company aired television commercials with the character of Rosie, a waitress who promoted Bounty as the “quicker picker-upper" over competing products.

  • #17. Snickers

    - Positive opinion: 79%
    - Negative opinion: 6%
    - Neutral opinion: 14%
    - Have heard of brand: 98%

    Mars Inc. sells more than 400 million Snickers bars every year. Founder Frank Mars invented the candy in 1930 and named it after a favorite horse.

  • #16. Windex

    - Positive opinion: 79%
    - Negative opinion: 3%
    - Neutral opinion: 15%
    - Have heard of brand: 97%

    The Drackett Co., which had invented Drano in the 1920s, invented Windex in 1933. It was originally marketed for cleaning automobile windows. One factor in its popularity was the spray gun nozzle on the plastic dispenser bottles.

    You may also like: Best value colleges in every state

  • #15. Sony

    - Positive opinion: 79%
    - Negative opinion: 3%
    - Neutral opinion: 16%
    - Have heard of brand: 98%

    The Japanese consumer electronics giant had huge successes with its Walkman portable cassette players, televisions, and its PlayStation line of video game consoles. It was one of the first Japanese companies to have a U.S. factory, and the quality of its products supposedly changed Americans’ views in the 1960s and later toward buying Japanese-made goods.

  • #14. Lysol

    - Positive opinion: 79%
    - Negative opinion: 3%
    - Neutral opinion: 15%
    - Have heard of brand: 97%

    Lysol sales soared this year as consumers bought up its disinfectants to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently approved Lysol Disinfectant Spray and Lysol Disinfectant Max Cover Mist as effective agents against COVID-19, and the head of Reckitt Benckiser, which makes Lysol products, recently said they were manufacturing 20 times more sanitizer than it was a year ago.

  • #13. Quaker

    - Positive opinion: 79%
    - Negative opinion: 3%
    - Neutral opinion: 16%
    - Have heard of brand: 98%

    The familiar Quaker Oats mascot was trademarked in 1877, and according to the company, the image was selected because Quakers conveyed principles of integrity, honesty, and purity. The brand’s round packaging first debuted in 1915, and Quaker Quick Oats followed in 1922, marking one of the nation’s first convenience-style products.

  • #12. Ritz

    - Positive opinion: 80%
    - Negative opinion: 4%
    - Neutral opinion: 15%
    - Have heard of brand: 98%

    Nabisco unveiled its Ritz crackers in markets in Philadelphia and Baltimore in 1934 during the Great Depression. The brand slogan described the crackers as “a bit of the good life.” They were selling nationwide the following year.

  • #11. Clorox

    - Positive opinion: 80%
    - Negative opinion: 3%
    - Neutral opinion: 16%
    - Have heard of brand: 98%

    The Electro-Alkaline Co. started selling commercial liquid bleach in 1914 and trademarked the brand name Clorox. It became the Clorox Chemical Corp. in 1928 and went public. Recently, the company has seen unprecedented demand for its products, particularly its Clorox Disinfecting Wipes, to help stop the spread of coronavirus. In April, President Donald Trump theorized about injecting disinfectant to help the body fight COVID-19. A posting on the Clorox website now warns consumers that “bleach and other disinfectants are not suitable for consumption or injection under any circumstances.”

    You may also like: States where you are most likely to hit a deer

2018 All rights reserved.