Skip to main content

Main Area

Main

Tracking how COVID-19 spread in every state

  • South Dakota

    - First COVID-19 records: March 11 (first case), March 18 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: April 15 (cases)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: May 7 to May 13 (cases), April 30 to May 6 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 6,419
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 84

    Many experts have pointed to the close proximity of people in urban areas to explain why COVID-19 travels faster in those cities. However, the close family ties common in South Dakota accounted for more of the spread there, with intergenerational family visits posing a particular risk to older family members.

     

  • Tennessee

    - First COVID-19 records: March 5 (first case), March 23 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: March 27 (cases)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: June 18 to June 24 (cases), June 11 to June 17 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 37,235
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 556

    Many common causes have been attributed to COVID-19 spread in Tennessee, including lax social distancing and close conditions in prisons. Additionally, state officials have noticed that migrant communities of farm workers have generated hot spots in some rural parts of the state, prompting concern from health experts.

     

  • Texas

    - First COVID-19 records: March 4 (first case), March 17 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: March 26 (cases), May 8 (deaths)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: June 18 to June 24 (cases), May 14 to May 20 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 125,921
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 2,249

    Texas has the highest rate of COVID-19 spread in the country. The state began aggressively reopening in early May, and doctors have warned that the reopening is happening too quickly, reporting a highest single-day total of new cases 14 days after reopening—the same time as the virus’ incubation period.

     

  • Utah

    - First COVID-19 records: March 7 (first case), March 22 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: April 1 (cases)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: June 18 to June 24 (cases), June 11 to June 17 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 18,784
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 163

    Researchers looking at COVID-19 spread in Utah have noted the state was particularly poorly equipped to help its Hispanic population. A lack of proper outreach contributed to a situation where Hispanic infection totals were among the highest in the state and of a share disproportionate with the population at large.

    You may also like: How the most common jobs in America are impacted by COVID-19

  • Vermont

    - First COVID-19 records: March 7 (first case), March 20 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: June 4 (cases)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: April 2 to April 8 (cases), April 16 to April 22 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 1,184
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 56

    A March 10 University of Vermont basketball game was a super-spreader for the virus. At least 16 people in attendance were reported to have contracted the virus, and at least three died.

     

  • Virginia

    - First COVID-19 records: March 8 (first case), March 15 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: March 30 (cases), May 16 (deaths)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: May 21 to May 27 (cases), May 7 to May 13 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 59,514
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 1,661

    Chicken processing plants were responsible for significant COVID-19 spread in Virginia. The plants continued operating even after recording a high number of cases, contributing to many more cases that spread out from the plants into the communities and homes of its workers.

     

  • Washington

    - First COVID-19 records: January 22 (first case), February 26 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: March 10 (cases), May 17 (deaths)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: March 26 to April 1 (cases), April 2 to April 8 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 29,386
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 1,284

    Washington was one of the earliest states to report COVID-19 cases in the United States. The state had a high number of cases that came from travelers entering from Asia, which is perhaps no surprise due to its relatively close proximity to the continent.

     

  • Washington, D.C.

    - First COVID-19 records: March 8 (first case), March 20 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: April 6 (cases)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: April 30 to May 6 (cases), April 23 to April 29 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 10,128
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 541

    As Washington D.C. calculates and reports its numbers of new COVID-19 cases, it has used a metric that some are calling questionable. The state isn’t taking prisons, nursing homes, or shelters into consideration, saying that these populations are not mixing freely in the population, and therefore should not be considered when reopenings are considered.

     

  • West Virginia

    - First COVID-19 records: March 18 (first case), March 30 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: April 25 (cases)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: May 21 to May 27 (cases), April 16 to April 22 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 2,629
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 92

    Church gatherings have been blamed for some of the virus spread in West Virginia. In recent weeks, the state has seen an outbreak of cases from those who have visited churches, which National Guardsmen have been called in to decontaminate.

     

  • Wisconsin

    - First COVID-19 records: March 4 (first case), March 20 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: March 29 (cases)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: May 21 to May 27 (cases), April 9 to April 15 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 25,763
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 757

    A virologist in Wisconsin has noted that stay-at-home measures helped curb the spread of different strains of the virus. He found that different strains were prevalent in different communities, and that the lack of cross-contamination showed that social distancing restrictions were vital in keeping the spread contained.

2018 All rights reserved.