Skip to main content

Main Area

Main

Tracking how COVID-19 spread in every state

  • New Mexico

    - First COVID-19 records: March 11 (first case), March 25 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: April 10 (cases)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: April 30 to May 6 (cases), May 14 to May 20 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 10,838
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 476

    COVID-19 spread rapidly through New Mexico’s youth. This particularly concerned officials with respect to the Navajo Nation reservations, where younger people carried the specific risk of passing the virus to older parents.

     

  • New York

    - First COVID-19 records: March 4 (first case), March 15 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: March 17 (cases), March 30 (deaths)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: April 2 to April 8 (cases), April 9 to April 15 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 389,666
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 24,782

    New York City was arguably the epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak in America for weeks at a time this spring. One reason was due to the vast amounts of travel coming into the state and especially the city, particularly from Europe, where the virus had already been circulating.

     

  • North Carolina

    - First COVID-19 records: March 4 (first case), March 25 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: March 29 (cases), June 8 (deaths)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: June 18 to June 24 (cases), May 28 to June 3 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 56,174
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 1,266

    Nursing homes were particularly hard hit in North Carolina. In April, the state reported that 40% of its fatalities had occurred in nursing homes, which are known to be super-spreaders in already vulnerable populations.

     

  • North Dakota

    - First COVID-19 records: March 12 (first case), March 28 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: April 29 (cases)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: May 14 to May 20 (cases), May 28 to June 3 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 3,362
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 86

    North Dakota closed its premier tourist attraction, a national park, to help curb the spread of the virus. This was a particularly notable move in an environment where many parks stayed open with restrictions, based on the idea that the virus would be less contagious outdoors.

    You may also like: Every state is now reopened. See where your state stands.

  • Ohio

    - First COVID-19 records: March 9 (first case), March 20 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: March 27 (cases), May 1 (deaths)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: April 16 to April 22 (cases), April 23 to April 29 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 46,759
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 2,755

    Prisons have been particularly serious vectors for COVID-19 in Ohio. Two prisons in the state were even found at one point to be the top COVID-19 hot spots in the country, in part because inmates were forced to live and sleep in such close proximity.

     

  • Oklahoma

    - First COVID-19 records: March 7 (first case), March 19 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: April 4 (cases)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: June 18 to June 24 (cases), April 2 to April 8 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 11,510
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 372

    Oklahoma had eased many of its distancing and closure restrictions by June, and this has led to a spike in cases. State officials are attributing this to community spread, meaning the lack of social distancing practices popular early in the pandemic.

     

  • Oregon

    - First COVID-19 records: March 4 (first case), March 18 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: April 5 (cases)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: June 18 to June 24 (cases), April 9 to April 15 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 7,444
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 195

    Oregon’s spread has been influenced by a controversial idea by public health officials. One top state health official said that asymptomatic carriers were not a priority for the state, and the track and trace program the state has implemented reflects its concern primarily with people showing symptoms.

     

  • Pennsylvania

    - First COVID-19 records: March 6 (first case), March 18 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: March 25 (cases), April 19 (deaths)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: April 2 to April 8 (cases), April 16 to April 22 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 83,191
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 6,518

    A single resident from New Jersey was responsible for 12 new cases of COVID-19 in Pennsylvania right after Memorial Day. The resident attended beach house parties over the holiday weekend that infected numerous individuals—a prime example of a super-spreader event.

     

  • Rhode Island

    - First COVID-19 records: March 1 (first case), March 29 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: April 6 (cases)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: April 23 to April 29 (cases), April 30 to May 6 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 16,606
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 912

    One of Rhode Island’s top concerns in the early days of the pandemic was limiting the spread from people who had fled to Rhode Island from elsewhere. The governor had put in place a controversial policy that stopped people with New York plates to collect their contact information in order to curb the spread.

    You may also like: Biggest population groups vulnerable to COVID-19 in every state

  • South Carolina

    - First COVID-19 records: March 7 (first case), March 16 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: March 31 (cases)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: June 18 to June 24 (cases), April 30 to May 6 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 27,897
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 683

    June’s increased numbers in South Carolina were due to a trend that troubled medical experts. While earlier outbreaks were concentrated among the elderly, new cases are coming in from younger populations, who may be flouting social distancing rules and refusing to wear masks.

     

2018 All rights reserved.