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Tracking how COVID-19 spread in every state

  • Hawaii

    - First COVID-19 records: March 7 (first case), April 1 (first death)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: April 2 to April 8 (cases), April 23 to April 29 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 819
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 17

    Hawaii imposed a 14-day lockdown on anyone traveling to the state in March, which health experts say was pivotal to curbing the spread of the virus. But the blow to the tourism-dependent economy has been severe, with many residents fearing the effects of continued unemployment as much as they do COVID-19 itself.

     

  • Idaho

    - First COVID-19 records: March 14 (first case), March 27 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: April 4 (cases)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: June 18 to June 24 (cases), April 9 to April 15 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 4,402
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 89

    Idaho has recently entered the final phase of its reopening, but COVID-19 case numbers are still climbing. The state has said that community spread is still occurring in half of its counties, which means that not all residents are following appropriate social distancing practices.

     

  • Illinois

    - First COVID-19 records: March 4 (first case), March 17 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: March 22 (cases), April 16 (deaths)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: April 30 to May 6 (cases), May 7 to May 13 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 139,540
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 6,974

    In early May, Illinois saw a spate of protests against stay-at-home orders. Residents who had been under lockdown for weeks gathered to insist the governor reopen the state, and the following week saw the largest increase in deaths the state has on record.

     

  • Indiana

    - First COVID-19 records: March 6 (first case), March 16 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: March 28 (cases), April 29 (deaths)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: April 23 to April 29 (cases), April 23 to April 29 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 43,140
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 2,578

    Many COVID-19 hot-spots are urban, but the opposite was true in Indiana this spring. A basketball game in a rural part of the state became a super-spreader event after a high school championship game went ahead as scheduled.

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  • Iowa

    - First COVID-19 records: March 9 (first case), March 25 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: April 7 (cases)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: April 30 to May 6 (cases), May 21 to May 27 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 26,705
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 692

    Spring break played a big part of the early COVID-19 spread in Iowa. The state is home to many universities, including its flagship University of Iowa in Iowa City, and the influx and outflux of many students during the first two weeks of March for spring break was a key part of the virus’ spread.

     

  • Kansas

    - First COVID-19 records: March 8 (first case), March 14 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: April 8 (cases)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: April 30 to May 6 (cases), April 9 to April 15 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 12,970
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 261

    One business not in full compliance with the state’s stay-at-home orders has been responsible for spreading COVID-19 rapidly. A paper goods company in the state did not practice social distancing and was responsible for hundreds of cases.

     

  • Kentucky

    - First COVID-19 records: March 7 (first case), March 16 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: April 7 (cases)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: June 4 to June 10 (cases), April 16 to April 22 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 14,363
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 538

    A recent spike in infections in Kentucky is not due to protests against police brutality that have emerged recently in the state, state officials say. Those protests have been held outdoors with many attendees wearing masks, showing that both are key for reducing the spread of the virus.

     

  • Louisiana

    - First COVID-19 records: March 9 (first case), March 15 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: March 23 (cases), April 14 (deaths)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: April 2 to April 8 (cases), April 9 to April 15 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 52,477
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 3,152

    At one point, confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Louisiana grew at one of the fastest rates in the world. This dire transmission rate gave the state cover to impose dramatic lockdown measures, and have citizens largely comply with them, which has contributed to declining caseloads.

     

  • Maine

    - First COVID-19 records: March 12 (first case), March 27 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: April 26 (cases)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: May 21 to May 27 (cases), April 16 to April 22 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 3,017
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 103

    Maine’s strict social distancing measures have helped curb the spread of the virus. The governor has mandated masks in public spaces, and requires anyone entering the state to show a negative COVID-19 test.

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  • Maryland

    - First COVID-19 records: March 6 (first case), March 18 (first death)
    - Date the state passed 1,000: March 29 (cases), April 26 (deaths)
    - Weeks with the sharpest increases: May 14 to May 20 (cases), April 23 to April 29 (deaths)
    - Total case count as of June 24: 65,337
    - Total death toll as of June 24: 3,108

    The governor of Maryland came under fire from the Trump administration at the peak of its COVID-19 epidemic thus far. The reason was that they got tests from South Korea, which had them in supply exactly when Maryland needed them after the federal government did not help.

     

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