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100 Worst Horror Films of All Time

  • The Weinstein Company
    1/ The Weinstein Company

    100 Worst Horror Films of All Time

    In the difficult economics of 2010s Hollywood (where superhero movies and Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson seem the only safe bets to make money) one genre has risen as the place to take a chance: horror. Relatively cheap to make—while still best experienced in a theater—horror has become one of the only places to tell stories without capes and tights. No one has shepherded the genre better than Jason Blum, creator of Blumhouse Productions, who standardized the low-budget model/high return model that has given us Paranormal Activity, Split, and the truly incredible Get Out.

    Horror can be great—it can expose social ills and collective moral rot. It also can be fun and frightening and refreshingly low-stakes. But, as these 100 movies prove, when directors don’t stick the landing, it can be something else entirely. These films, helmed by everyone from James Cameron to Uwe Boll, and starring greats like Richard Burton and Marlon Brando (along with many, many Tara Reid appearances), are just plain bad.

    What follows is The Stacker’s list of the 100 Worst Horror Films of All Time, which we calculated using a combination of IMDb and Rotten Tomatoes scores, while excluding films with less than 5,000 IMDb votes. (Note: the films must be tagged “horror” for consideration). Be afraid, be very afraid...

  • World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE)
    2/ World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE)

    #100. See No Evil

    Stacker Score: 38.10

    IMDb Rating: 5.1

    Tomatometer: 8%

    Year released: 2006

    The first release by WWE Films, See No Evil follows a group of delinquent teens sent to clean up an abandoned hotel—that just so happens to be the hideout of hook-handed murderer Jacob Goodnight. The villain is played by professional wrestler and all-around frightening human Kane, but the Undertaker’s brother deserved better for his acting debut—a film is never going to work with a killer named Goodnight. It would be four years until Kane realized his acting potential, portraying Tanker Lutz in MacGruber.

  • Film002
    3/ Film002

    #99. Cabin Fever 3: Patient Zero

    Stacker Score: 38.00

    IMDb Rating: 4.4

    Tomatometer: 24%

    Year released: 2014

    In a prequel that not many were clamoring for, Cabin Fever 3: Patient Zero tells the story of the moment the titular virus first breaks out. Porter (played by Sean Astin) is a prisoner being held by a group of scientists attempting to create a vaccine; when a group of friends on a bachelor party boat ride stumble across the lab, shenanigans ensue. Sean Astin works a lot, but hopefully his fantastic portrayal of Bob in season two of Stranger Things will mean he never has to do a horror prequel again.

  • Revolution Studios
    4/ Revolution Studios

    #98. Darkness Falls

    Stacker Score: 38.00

    IMDb Rating: 5.0

    Tomatometer: 10%

    Year released: 2003

    The wonderfully insane Darkness Falls attempts to tell the origin story of the Tooth Fairy, and then imagines that she’s a murderous spirit out for revenge. Directed by Jonathan Liebesman (Battle: Los Angeles), the horror film pits the evil fairy against a man (Chaney Kley) who was wrongfully accused of murdering his mother. But of course, the evil sprite is the real killer. In case you were wondering what kind of film this is, the town is named Darkness Falls.

  • Summit Entertainment
    5/ Summit Entertainment

    #97. The Darkest Hour

    Stacker Score: 37.90

    IMDb Rating: 4.9

    Tomatometer: 12%

    Year released: 2011

     At this year’s Academy Awards, Gary Oldman’s portrayal of Winston Churchill in Darkest Hour may win him Best Actor. But The Darkest Hour is most certainly not that film. Director Chris Gorak’s movie tells the story of two software designers, their two love interests, and their shady partner, all of whom may be the last survivors after an alien attack on the power grid. Emile Hirsch stars as one of the software designers/alien survivalists who happens to be in Moscow for a deal gone wrong. The title refers to both the moment for humanity and the fact that without power, things go dark!

  • Hollywood Pictures
    6/ Hollywood Pictures

    #96. An American Werewolf in Paris

    Stacker Score: 37.80

    IMDb Rating: 5.1

    Tomatometer: 7%

    Year released: 1997

    The follow-up to the 1981 cult classic An American Werewolf in London, the 1997 film misses the fun of the first offering. The makeup effects of its predecessor was done by one of the all-time greats, Rick Baker (Men in Black and Thriller)—the second relied on terrible late-90s CGI.

  • Metro-Gldwyn-Mayer (MGM)
    7/ Metro-Gldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

    #95. Poltergeist III

    Stacker Score: 37.60

    IMDb Rating: 4.6

    Tomatometer: 18%

    Year released: 1988

    The first Poltergeist was a cultural event—when it hit theaters, it gave an entire generation nightmares. After a somewhat successful sequel, the screenwriters left before the third film—and it shows. Carol Anne (Heather O’Rourke) is sent to Chicago to live in a highrise with her aunt and uncle, but, lo and behold, Reverend Henry Kane manages to haunt her there as well. The film was a box office and critical flop—but after 27 years in purgatory the Poltergeist franchise rebooted in 2015.  

  • Paramount Pictures
    8/ Paramount Pictures

    #94. Graveyard Shift

    Stacker Score: 37.50

    IMDb Rating: 4.8

    Tomatometer: 13%

    Year released: 1990

    Based on a Stephen King short story, Graveyard Shift takes us to a dilapidated mill with a rat problem—and a “mysterious death” problem. John Hall (David Andrews) is sent down to deal with the infestation in the basement, but ends up finding a maze of tunnels that leads to a horrifying secret. Its tagline, “Stephen King took you to the edge with The Shining and Pet Sematary. This time….he pushes you over,” set this film up to fail. The first and last feature film directed by Ralph S. Singleton, Graveyard Shift was never going to be in the same ballpark as a Stanley Kubrick classic.  

  • New Line Cinema
    9/ New Line Cinema

    #93. The Island of Dr. Moreau

    Stacker Score: 37.40

    IMDb Rating: 4.4

    Tomatometer: 22%

    Year released: 1996

    This remake of the 1977 Burt Lancaster original is one of the most infamous production disasters in Hollywood’s history. Director Richard Stanley fought with the studio from the beginning and had endless issues with its original star, Bruce Willis, his even more difficult replacement Val Kilmer, and his biggest ally, Marlon Brando, who was regularly absent. The film itself was a disastrous flop, but it did lead to a wonderful behind-the-scenes documentary called Lost Soul: The Doomed Journey of Richard Stanley’s Island of Dr. Moreau.

  • New Line Cinema
    10/ New Line Cinema

    #92. Jason Goes to Hell: The Final Friday

    Stacker Score: 37.30

    IMDb Rating: 4.3

    Tomatometer: 24%

    Year released: 1993

    The ninth installment in Friday the 13th franchise is about as bad as you’d expect the ninth installment in any franchise to be (except Fast and the Furious, which has broken every rule of franchises). This time, after Jason Voorhees’s body is destroyed by FBI agents at Camp Crystal Lake, his evil spirit starts jumping from host to host. This was sold as the final Friday the 13th film, but eight years later, Jason was back. In Hollywood, a profitable franchise is like a horror film villain—it’s impossible to kill.  

  • Davis-Films
    11/ Davis-Films

    #91. Silent Hill: Revelation

    Stacker Score: 37.10

    IMDb Rating: 5.0

    Tomatometer: 7%

    Year released: 2012

    Based on the video game Silent Hill 3, the movie’s titular revelation refers to teenager Heather Mason (Adelaide Clemens) learning on her 18th birthday that her identity is a lie. This film was panned by critics and despised by fans, but it did feature performances from Game of Thrones favorites Kit Harington (Jon Snow) and Sean Bean (Ned Stark)—perhaps this film would be better received if it was presented as an alternate reality horror spin-off of the HBO series.

  • Mutual Film Company
    12/ Mutual Film Company

    #90. Virus

    Stacker Score: 37.00

    IMDb Rating: 4.9

    Tomatometer: 9%

    Year released: 1999

    Based on a comic book by Chuck Pfarrer, Virus tells the story of a shipwrecked crew that boards a deserted Russian ship. It soon becomes clear that something extraterrestrial is aboard that is attempting to control the humans. This film stars Jamie Lee Curtis, Donald Sutherland, and Billy Baldwin, but was the first feature film ever directed by visual effects guy John Bruno—and perhaps he should have stuck to his day job.

  • Huayi Brothers Media
    13/ Huayi Brothers Media

    #89. The Bye Bye Man

    Stacker Score: 37.00

    IMDb Rating: 4.3

    Tomatometer: 23%

    Year released: 2017

    In The Bye Bye Man, a group of college-age friends are haunted by a creepy, hooded, malevolent figure, with the extra twist being that if you mention its name to others, said figure will start haunting them. So in an attempt to protect the others, the college students have to hunt the Bye Bye Man themselves. This movie is bad, but at least the Bye Bye Man is played by Doug Jones—the king of man-in-suit creatures who stars as the fish-man in Guillermo del Toro’s newest film, The Shape of Water. 

  • Hopscotch Features
    14/ Hopscotch Features

    #88. I, Frankenstein

    Stacker Score: 36.90

    IMDb Rating: 5.1

    Tomatometer: 4%

    Year released: 2014

    Written and directed by Stuart Beattie, I, Frankenstein is the truly wild story of what happens to Frankenstein’s monster after he kills his creator. Spoiler alert: he becomes the centerpiece in a battle between demons and gargoyles. Confused? That’s fair, but years ago Beattie wrote the Michael Mann thriller Collateral, so let the man live.

  • Infinity Films
    15/ Infinity Films

    #87. Jeepers Creepers III

    Stacker Score: 36.80

    IMDb Rating: 4.4

    Tomatometer: 20%

    Year released: 2017

    Clearly, someone saw Jeepers Creepers II (which takes place four days after the original) and said, “but what happens during those four days?” This film takes in the space between the first and second Jeepers Creepers and answers all of our burning questions. As you may imagine, some creeper-hunting happened, and we got somewhat of an origin story about where those dang creepers came from.

  • Shooting Gallery
    16/ Shooting Gallery

    #86. Strangeland

    Stacker Score: 36.80

    IMDb Rating: 5.0

    Tomatometer: 6%

    Year released: 1998

    Written by Twisted Sister frontman Dee Snider, Strangeland tells the story of Captain Howdy (played by Snider) who uses the guise of a houseparty to lure teenagers to his house. After two teen girls go missing, a detective begins to track Captain Howdy and learns that he’s into body modification rituals. This film uses meeting people through the internet as a major driver of the plot, which is wonderfully late-90s. As the story progresses, it becomes clear that Snider bit off more than he could chew, juggling themes of recidivism and mental health in addition to the piercing and branding stuff.

  • Halloween VI Productions
    17/ Halloween VI Productions

    #85. Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers

    Stacker Score: 36.80

    IMDb Rating: 5.0

    Tomatometer: 6%

    Year released: 1995

    The sixth installment of The Halloween franchise follows a young woman on October 31st attempting to escape the pursuit of Michael Myers. This film was released six years after Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers, the longest gap in the franchise’s 40-year run. Oddly, after a lukewarm response to the theatrical cut, fans found an earlier version with an alternate ending which became a bit of a cult sensation. The fact that it was better than the film that hit theaters in 1995 is really not saying much. Fun fact: this was Paul Rudd’s first post-Clueless starring role.

  • Rogue Pictures
    18/ Rogue Pictures

    #84. The Unborn

    Stacker Score: 36.60

    IMDb Rating: 4.8

    Tomatometer: 10%

    Year released: 2009

    Written and directed by David S. Goyer, The Unborn tells the story of Casey Beldon (Odette Annable), who is haunted by her unborn twin that died in the womb beside her. The film leans heavily on Jewish mysticism, with Beldon going to a rabbi played by Gary Oldman for help. Goyer wrote Batman Beginsand Blade, but also Batman v. Superman and a Ghost Rider sequel. And The Unborn solidly belongs in column two.

  • Hammerhead Productions
    19/ Hammerhead Productions

    #83. Supernova

    Stacker Score: 36.60

    IMDb Rating: 4.8

    Tomatometer: 10%

    Year released: 2000

    The crew of a medical spaceship—which includes James Spader and Angela Bassett—answers a distress signal from a mining ship. They save the mysterious young man aboard, but realize that he—and a giant star about to supernova—are both real dangers. As you’d expect, Supernova overflows with future space tension.

  • Paramount Pictures
    20/ Paramount Pictures

    #82. Bless the Child

    Stacker Score: 36.60

    IMDb Rating: 5.1

    Tomatometer: 3%

    Year released: 2000

    Kim Basinger plays a nurse who is left to care for the daughter of her drug-addicted sister. When the daughter goes missing, an FBI agent (Jimmy Smits) and Basinger’s character discover that the girl possesses supernatural powers and has been kidnapped by a Satanic cult.

  • New Line Cinema
    21/ New Line Cinema

    #81. Jason X

    Stacker Score: 36.50

    IMDb Rating: 4.4

    Tomatometer: 19%

    Year released: 2001

    Jason X (the X marks the fact that it’s the tenth Friday the 13th film) is an example of a weak elevator pitch come to life. Screenwriter Todd Farmer came to the studio with the idea of Jason Voorhees in space, and somehow the studio bit—leading to an insane film in which Jason awakens upon a spaceship in the 25th century, just as ready to murder as ever. Of all the people to cryogenically freeze, they had to go and freeze a murderous psychopath, huh?

  • Blumhouse Productions
    22/ Blumhouse Productions

    #80. Paranormal Activity: The Ghost Dimension

    Stacker Score: 36.40

    IMDb Rating: 4.6

    Tomatometer: 14%

    Year released: 2015

    In Paranormal Activity: The Ghost Dimension, a family finds a special video camera in their new home that allows them to see the spirits all around them. Although this film is bad, it’s hard to argue with anything producer Jason Blum does; the horror-savant continues to make low-budget films that entertain, excite, and make loads of money. And with Get Out, he also produced to make a film that might just be nominated for an Oscar.

  • Black Christmas
    23/ Black Christmas

    #79. Black Christmas

    Stacker Score: 36.40

    IMDb Rating: 4.6

    Tomatometer: 14%

    Year released: 2006

    A horribly traumatized young boy named Billy grows up to be a deranged man (Robert Mann) who is put in an insane asylum for the murder of his abusive mother and stepfather. When he breaks out on Christmas Eve and returns home, he discovers that his former home is now a sorority house. Unsurprisingly, the deranged Billy does not take this news well. 

  • Lava Bear Films
    24/ Lava Bear Films

    #78. The Forest

    Stacker Score: 36.30

    IMDb Rating: 4.8

    Tomatometer: 9%

    Year released: 2016

    The Forest tells the story of a young American woman, played by Natalie Dormer, who travels to Japan’s Aokigahara Forest (dubbed the Suicide Forest) to find her sister. The idea of Americans mining the Aokigahara Forest for entertainment value has always been distasteful, but the now-infamous Logan Paul video made the issue clear as day.

  • Relativity Media
    25/ Relativity Media

    #77. My Soul to Take

    Stacker Score: 36.30

    IMDb Rating: 4.8

    Tomatometer: 9%

    Year released: 2010

    Horror genius Wes Craven doesn’t miss often; the man responsible for The Hills Have Eyes, A Nightmare on Elm Street and Scream is one of the pillars of the genre. But even Craven doesn’t hit 100% of his shots. In My Soul to Take, a killer returns to a town and stalks seven teens born on the day he was supposedly killed. Luckily for Craven, the moment he shot the Drew Barrymore opening scene to Scream gave him a lifetime pass with horror fans.

  • Six Entertainment Company
    26/ Six Entertainment Company

    #76. The Human Centipede II (Full Sequence)

    Stacker Score: 36.30

    IMDb Rating: 3.9

    Tomatometer: 30%

    Year released: 2011

    In the world of The Human Centipede II (Full Sequence), the first Human Centipede film exists and is just as disturbing as ever. In the sequel, a mentally impaired man becomes obsessed with the first film, and attempts to recreate the horrific body combination/mutilation from the original, but with 12 victims. This whole series is absolutely stomach-turning and difficult to watch.

  • Twentieth Century Fox
    27/ Twentieth Century Fox

    #75. Aliens vs. Predator: Requiem

    Stacker Score: 36.20

    IMDb Rating: 4.7

    Tomatometer: 11%

    Year released: 2007

    AVP: Alien vs. Predator was greeted with a collective eye roll—it felt like the most brazen stretch of intellectual property imaginable. But have no fear, Hollywood had other plans. In Aliens vs. Predator: Requiem, the creatures from two separate franchises return to battle again—this time in a sleepy Colorado town. This film grossed more than $120 million worldwide, which feels dire and troubling, though hard to fully grasp.

  • Dimension Films
    28/ Dimension Films

    #74. Venom

    Stacker Score: 36.20

    IMDb Rating: 4.7

    Tomatometer: 11%

    Year released: 2005

    Jim Gillespie, director of I Know What You Did Last Summer, did not quite recapture the frightening fun of his 1997 classic. In Venom, a group of teenagers in Louisiana are pursued by the possessed body of one of their biological fathers. The body, sunk into the bayou and bitten by snakes, begins stalking the group of friends. This film is overrun with clichés, and happened to be released days after Hurricane Katrina, which made the critical reception to the Louisiana-based film especially rough.

  • Distant Horizon
    29/ Distant Horizon

    #73. The Mangler

    Stacker Score: 36.10

    IMDb Rating: 4.0

    Tomatometer: 27%

    Year released: 1995

    Directed by Tobe Hooper, the man behind the 1974 masterpiece The Texas Chainsaw MassacreThe Mangler may have suffered from overly hyped syndrome. Still, the elevator pitch for this film is one of the wildest imaginable: in an old-school laundry, the folding machine has been possessed and acquired a taste for blood. If you’ve ever been enticed by the idea of a machine to fold your clothes, perhaps you’ve been spared from disaster.

  • Constantin Films
    30/ Constantin Films

    #72. Skinwalkers

    Stacker Score: 36.10

    IMDb Rating: 4.6

    Tomatometer: 13%

    Year released: 2006

    Despite the charm of Michael J. Fox in Teen Wolf, it turns out it’s pretty hard to stick the landing on werewolf films. People love wolves (see: Game of Thrones) and they love spooky supernatural things that come at night (see: almost every horror movie), but the combination is tough to get right. In Skinwalkers, a young kid and his mother are targeted by two different packs of werewolves. But in case you were wondering, this film never reaches the level of Game of Thrones—it doesn’t even get close to Teen Wolf.

     

  • Twentieth Century Fox
    31/ Twentieth Century Fox

    #71. The Pyramid

    Stacker Score: 36.10

    IMDb Rating: 4.6

    Tomatometer: 13%

    Year released: 2014

    Set during the Egyptian uprising of 2012-2013, a team of archaeologists finds a buried three-sided pyramid near Cairo. After being told to leave the site because of nearby unrest, the scientists foolishly stay behind, enter the pyramid, and are attacked by supernatural creatures. The film is presented as found footage, but the unearned political setting and terrible dialogue make it better left unfound. 

  • Corn Cobb Productions
    32/ Corn Cobb Productions

    #70. Children of the Corn II: The Final Sacrifice

    Stacker Score: 36.00

    IMDb Rating: 4.2

    Tomatometer: 22%

    Year released: 1992

    Perhaps the 8-year gap is to blame for the brutal sequel to the first Children of the Corn. Possessed little kids are always scary, and small towns in Nebraska are pretty frightening as well, but Corn II never brings the fear factor of the original. In the sequel, a journalist (Terence Knox) and his son arrive in Gatlin, Nebraska, somehow unaware of the murderous child cult lurking in the town’s cornfields. Clearly, Knox is not the greatest of journalists.

  • The Weinstein Company
    33/ The Weinstein Company

    #69. Pulse

    Stacker Score: 35.90

    IMDb Rating: 4.7

    Tomatometer: 10%

    Year released: 2006

    After a hacker is attacked by a supernatural force that takes the will to live from people it affects, a suicide epidemic breaks out. The hacker and his girlfriend, psych student Mattie (Kristen Bell), work together to infect the system with a virus to save humanity. Tech films are always difficult, because of the balancing act of good dialogue with correct terminology, and because of their propensity to quickly become dated. But this one fails mainly because it never approaches the level of the Japanese original.

  • Abbolita Productions
    34/ Abbolita Productions

    #68. Yoga Hosers

    Stacker Score: 35.80

    IMDb Rating: 4.3

    Tomatometer: 19%

    Year released: 2016

    Director Kevin Smith had an incredible run in the 1990s. Beginning with Clerks, Smith made inventive, intimate love letters to nerd culture. But his 2010s have been less incredible. Yoga Hosers, which opened at the Sundance Film Festival, follows two teen yogis as they team up with a manhunter to fight off an evil spirit. The two young stars are Johnny Depp and Smith’s daughters, and Depp plays the manhunter. Although the newcomers in the cast were praised for their charm (nepotism be damned), it wasn’t enough to save this film from being universally panned by critics.

  • Avery Pix
    35/ Avery Pix

    #67. Lost Souls

    Stacker Score: 35.70

    IMDb Rating: 4.8

    Tomatometer: 7%

    Year released: 2000

    A group of priests and a Catholic school teacher (Winona Ryder) begin to believe that a writer (Ben Chaplin) is actually the Antichrist. The atheist writer is wary at first, but begins to believe the teacher as unexplainable things begin happening. This was the first directing gig for Academy Award-winning cinematographer Janusz Kaminski (who won for both Schindler’s List and Saving Private Ryan) and this clunker proves that he’s best as a director when the phrase “of photography” follows.

  • Film Victoria
    36/ Film Victoria

    #66. Long Weekend

    Stacker Score: 35.70

    IMDb Rating: 5.1

    Tomatometer: 0%

    Year released: 2008

    A remake of a 1978 Australian film of the same name, Long Weekend tells the story of an incompatible couple who goes camping on an isolated beach. What could possibly go wrong? They spend the weekend disrespecting the principles of Leave No Trace and are punished by Mother Nature for their disregard. Though the vengeful forces of nature are supposed to be the villain in this film, people who don’t pick up after themselves are the real monsters. This film is terrible, but the message is right on.

  • Lorimar Film Entertainment
    37/ Lorimar Film Entertainment

    #65. The Toxic Avenger Part II

    Stacker Score: 35.70

    IMDb Rating: 5.1

    Tomatometer: 0%

    Year released: 1989

    The second in The Toxic Avenger series (seriously, there are four of these things) tells the continuing adventures of a once puny weakling who becomes a grotesque superhuman after falling in a puddle of toxic waste. This film received a 0% on Rotten Tomatoes, but has had a second life, along with the rest of the series, as a cult film/midnight movie. It’s a solid example of the “so bad, it’s good” designation for sloppy B movies.

  • Gold Circle Films
    38/ Gold Circle Films

    #64. ATM

    Stacker Score: 35.60

    IMDb Rating: 4.7

    Tomatometer: 9%

    Year released: 2012

    The walk-in ATM room has always had the potential for fright—its fluorescent lighting, glass walls, one exit, and the fact that your back is turned (never mind the fact that you’re exchanging personal information to obtain a wad of cash) make it ripe for a horror film. However, unlike the fantastic Friends episode where Chandler becomes stuck in an ATM room with a beautiful stranger, none of the three trapped friends (Josh Peck, Brian Geraghty, and Alice Eve) in the film ATM come close to being memorable characters.

  • Screen Gems
    39/ Screen Gems

    #63. The Roommate

    Stacker Score: 35.50

    IMDb Rating: 4.9

    Tomatometer: 4%

    Year released: 2011

    Based on its fantastic premise, The Roommate should have worked. Upon arriving at college, Sara (Minka Kelly) becomes fast friends with her freshman roommate, Rebecca (Leighton Meester), whom she does not realize is obsessed with her. Sure enough, everyone around her starts to suffer the wrath of Rebecca. A remake of the classic thriller Single White FemaleThe Roommate is sorely missing talent on par with a Bridget Fonda or Jennifer Jason Leigh.

  • EuropaCorp
    40/ EuropaCorp

    #62. Shut In

    Stacker Score: 35.30

    IMDb Rating: 4.7

    Tomatometer: 8%

    Year released: 2016

    When stepmother Mary (Naomi Watts) loses her husband in a crash that leaves her stepson, Stephen (Charlie Heaton) in a vegetative state, she puts her life on hold to care for him. But when she takes in a second kid and a snowstorm hits, things start to get more than a bit weird. Watts is a great actress, and Heaton (Jonathan from Stranger Things) is sufficiently creepy, but this movie just doesn’t work.

  • Warner Bros.
    41/ Warner Bros.

    #61. Valentine

    Stacker Score: 35.30

    IMDb Rating: 4.7

    Tomatometer: 8%

    Year released: 2001

    After four popular girls reject the nerdy Jeremy Melton (Joel Palmer), a fifth betrays him in front of the school bullies at a 1988 Valentine’s Day school dance. 13 years later, the five girls are looking for love—but when one of the girls is murdered after a bad date, the other four must unite to defeat the killer in the Cupid mask. (Wonder who it could be?) Critics admitted that the film had stylish moments, but was ultimately flaky and derivative.

  • New Line Cinema
    42/ New Line Cinema

    #60. Bones

    Stacker Score: 35.00

    IMDb Rating: 4.1

    Tomatometer: 21%

    Year released: 2001

    After directing the fantastic Tupac film Juice, Ernest R. Dickerson thought he had another rapper-helmed masterpiece with Bones. But the story of the vengeful, murderous ghost of neighborhood bastion Jimmy Bones (Snoop Dogg), who died violently after being betrayed 22 years earlier, wasn’t as captivating with audiences. The title character avenges his death through a series of murders, and even threatens the former love of his life (Pam Grier). Snoop Dogg is one of the greatest rappers of all time—but Snoop Dogg is not one of the greatest actors of all time.

  • Lions Gate Films
    43/ Lions Gate Films

    #59. Godsend

    Stacker Score: 34.80

    IMDb Rating: 4.8

    Tomatometer: 4%

    Year released: 2004

    As you’d expect, when a couple (Greg Kinnear and Rebecca Romijn) allow a strange doctor (Robert DeNiro) to clone their dead son, bizarre happenings follow. And as it normally goes in the horror universe, not letting the dead rest leads to all sorts of trouble. This film was panned for lacking originality, but also because it felt wrong to waste such a great cast.

  • Warner Bros.
    44/ Warner Bros.

    #58. The Swarm

    Stacker Score: 34.70

    IMDb Rating: 4.4

    Tomatometer: 13%

    Year released: 1978

    A campy mess of a film, The Swarm tells the story of a deadly swarm of killer bees that arrives in the United States and wreaks havoc. It should be said that this movie’s over-the-top terribleness makes it fun, rather than grim and boring like some of the others on this list. And, most importantly of all, it stars a young Michael Caine as an entomologist picked by the president to fight off the murderous insects.

  • Paramount Pictures
    45/ Paramount Pictures

    #57. Friday the 13th Part VIII: Jason Takes Manhattan

    Stacker Score: 34.60

    IMDb Rating: 4.6

    Tomatometer: 8%

    Year released: 1989

    The eighth Friday the 13th of the decade, Friday the 13th Part VIII: Jason Takes Manhattan is a mess of a film. Jason Voorhees manages to be transported from the bottom of a lake to a party boat for a high school graduation, where he does Jason Voorhees things. Though the film has one of the greatest subtitles ever, barely any of the action actually takes place in Manhattan—bad news for anyone looking for fish-out-of-water fun on the level of Babe: Pig in the City

  • Blumhouse
    46/ Blumhouse

    #56. Area 51

    Stacker Score: 34.50

    IMDb Rating: 4.2

    Tomatometer: 17%

    Year released: 2015

    Another less-than-stellar release from the usually unimpeachable Blumhouse Productions, Area 51 tells the story of three teenage conspiracy theorists who attempt to break into the alleged alien landing spot of Area 51. This movie was shelved for five years, mainly because it’s a great ending with no film to support it. Area 51 was director Oren Peli’s follow-up to the megahit Paranormal Activity—so I guess they can’t all be box office gold.

  • Eddie Murphy Productions
    47/ Eddie Murphy Productions

    #55. Vampire in Brooklyn

    Stacker Score: 34.50

    IMDb Rating: 4.5

    Tomatometer: 10%

    Year released: 1995

    This movie is a truly uncomfortable watch. Eddie Murphy is a comic genius, Wes Craven is a horror savant, Angela Bassett is a star, and none of it matters. Murphy uses a truly terrible accent to play a Caribbean vampire in Brooklyn. The jokes don’t hit. It isn’t scary. It’s just bad. 

  • Columbia Pictures
    48/ Columbia Pictures

    #54. I Still Know What You Did Last Summer

    Stacker Score: 34.30

    IMDb Rating: 4.6

    Tomatometer: 7%

    Year released: 1998

    The two surviving teens from the first film—played by Jennifer Love Hewitt and Freddie Prinze Jr. (who we always knew were too pretty and famous to get killed)—are still being chased by the ice-hooked fisherman they left to die. This time, they’re at a beautiful island resort. It’s a bit of retread of the first film, but for readers of a certain age, it was still a hugely important piece of cinema. 

  • New Line Cinema
    49/ New Line Cinema

    #53. The Gallows

    Stacker Score: 34.20

    IMDb Rating: 4.2

    Tomatometer: 16%

    Year released: 2015

    As horror-film aficionados know, let what’s dead lie. In this found-footage mess of a film, a high school attempts to memorialize a high school production that ended in a deadly accident twenty years before. As expected, things goes horribly wrong. Who said high school theater wasn’t an extreme sport?

  • Twentieth Century Fox
    50/ Twentieth Century Fox

    #52. Devil's Due

    Stacker Score: 33.80

    IMDb Rating: 4.1

    Tomatometer: 17%

    Year released: 2014

    The genius of Paranormal Activity and The Blair Witch Project was not without cost—it led to a runoff of endless “found footage” horror films (see the previous item). Seemingly filmic and absolutely cheap, this list is populated with failed attempt after failed attempt to recapture the horrifying realism of those two movies. Devil’s Due uses a couple’s honeymoon and subsequent pregnancy to retell Rosemary’s Baby, but the gimmicky home video conceit hamstrings the storytelling.

  • Showbox Entertainment
    51/ Showbox Entertainment

    #51. Dragon Wars: D-War

    Stacker Score: 33.60

    IMDb Rating: 3.6

    Tomatometer: 28%

    Year released: 2007

    This monster movie by Korean director Shim Hyung-Rae is more fantasy than horror. But the story of a journalist and a mysteriously ill woman trying to save Los Angeles from monsters is so terrible that it’s really more of a comedy. To be clear, this film is not good—but, it’s kind of fun.

  • Carolco Pictures
    52/ Carolco Pictures

    #50. Repossessed

    Stacker Score: 33.60

    IMDb Rating: 4.8

    Tomatometer: 0%

    Year released: 1990

    Spoof-king Leslie Nielsen plays Father Jebediah Mayii, who is called in to help exorcise a housewife (Linda Blair) who is possessed by the devil while watching TV. Nielsen, who spoofed cop films with The Naked Gun and war films with Hot Shots attempts to spoof The Exorcist with lacking results. Somehow, the studio was able to convince Blair, who played the possessed child in the original, to return for the comedy remake, but there’s no priest in the world who could save this mess.

  • Macari/Edelstein
    53/ Macari/Edelstein

    #49. Rings

    Stacker Score: 33.60

    IMDb Rating: 4.5

    Tomatometer: 7%

    Year released: 2017

    The third film in The Ring trilogy, Rings reworks the same central idea—there’s a cursed film that when seen kills the viewer in seven days. This time, the protagonist (Matilda Lutz) sacrifices herself to save her boyfriend, only to discover that inside the film there is another film. It would have been better if someone involved had realized that although there was another film after first Ring, there should never have been a third.

  • Incentive Filmed Entertainment
    54/ Incentive Filmed Entertainment

    #48. Shark Night 3D

    Stacker Score: 33.40

    IMDb Rating: 4.0

    Tomatometer: 18%

    Year released: 2011

    The finest camp arrives by accident—some beautiful, mysterious force stumbled upon by a mix of heartfelt attempts and bungled results. But with Shark Night 3D, by the director of Snakes on a Plane, the attempts to be throwback and campy make it feel artificial and off-putting. In this movie, seven college friends have had their vacation rudely interrupted by a pack of killer sharks. It’s a throwback to teen thrillers in the same way that a keychain of Michelangelo's David is to the statue in Florence—they look similar enough, but the lack of ambition shows.

  • Universal Pictures
    55/ Universal Pictures

    #47. Ouija

    Stacker Score: 33.30

    IMDb Rating: 4.5

    Tomatometer: 6%

    Year released: 2014

    Expectedly, a group of friends awaken an evil spirit while playing with their Ouija board. The Ouija board is fascinating for a lot of reasons: it teaches you which of your friends are the type to covertly move the piece; you learn if perhaps you are the type to move the piece, and you might even find out if Billy actually has a crush on you or not. This movie could have worked, but it’s probably best it failed—Hollywood’s rush to adapt board games into films is a threat to all that is good in the world.

  • Lions Gate Films
    56/ Lions Gate Films

    #46. Man-Thing

    Stacker Score: 33.10

    IMDb Rating: 4.0

    Tomatometer: 17%

    Year released: 2005

    While this film about a swamp creature awoken by a greedy oil baron drilling in Louisiana inevitably fails (this is the Worst Horror Films of All Time, after all), there’s something bold and commendable about naming your film and your monster Man-Thing. Transport yourself to the scene: [int. A coffee shop in Los Feliz] A screenwriter scribbles and then crosses out, scribbles then crosses out, again and again in his notebook. Finally, as if struck by lightning, he screams, startling the other patrons. He calls his agent, excitedly, knowing that finally he will be somebody in this town. “Brad, I’ve got it: Man-Thing!”

  • Genre Co.
    57/ Genre Co.

    #45. Cell

    Stacker Score: 33.10

    IMDb Rating: 4.3

    Tomatometer: 10%

    Year released: 2016

    While there are certainly better uses of a time machine, imagine the incredulity you’d be met with if you transported yourself to the early 2000s and told someone that John Cusack and Samuel L. Jackson would be in a movie that made under $800,000 at the box office in 2016. Cell is a film about how terrible cellphones are, and how they make us all want to kill each other. But something is missing—Cusack lacks his normal charm and Jackson seems uninterested. While time travel is still beyond us, not watching this movie can add 98 minutes to your life.

  • StudioCanal
    58/ StudioCanal

    #44. The Last Exorcism Part II

    Stacker Score: 32.80

    IMDb Rating: 4.0

    Tomatometer: 16%

    Year released: 2013

    Released in the moment when Harry PotterHunger Games, and other megahit franchises were splitting their final offerings to grab more money at the box office, a movie illogically named The Last Exorcism Part II is less striking. But one has to believe that the accidental success of The Last Exorcism, which told the story of a charlatan reverend and made back more than 35 times its budget, led to more seemingly final exorcisms taking place. In this sequel, the previously possessed Nell (Ashley Bell) must try to deal with demons again, and maybe possibly, exorcise some things.    

  • Metro-Gldwyn-Mayer (MGM)
    59/ Metro-Gldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

    #43. Species II

    Stacker Score: 32.80

    IMDb Rating: 4.3

    Tomatometer: 9%

    Year released: 1998

    In the first Species, Natasha Henstridge played a beautiful, evil half-human, half-alien. But in the sequel, she portrays a government creation made to study how to combat future alien invaders. When an astronaut gets infected, he comes home to fame and lots of luck with the ladies. Unfortunately, any woman who sleeps with the astronaut gets pregnant with alien embryos and then dies. Madness ensues in this horribly acted, oversexed sequel.

  • Raincreek Productions
    60/ Raincreek Productions

    #42. Beneath the Darkness

    Stacker Score: 32.70

    IMDb Rating: 4.5

    Tomatometer: 4%

    Year released: 2011

    After a group of teens breaks into the house of the town’s mortician, Ely Vaughn (Dennis Quaid), one of them is attacked by him. The teens flee, trying and failing to prove that the well-respected Vaughn is actually deranged. Quaid does his best turn as a psychopath, but the rest of the film is predictable and boring. 

  • Screen Gems
    61/ Screen Gems

    #41. Boogeyman

    Stacker Score: 32.60

    IMDb Rating: 4.1

    Tomatometer: 13%

    Year released: 2005

    In Boogeyman, Barry Watson plays Tim, a regular 20-something with a single oddity—he’s deathly afraid of the Boogeyman. As we learn that Tim saw his father sucked into the closet at the age of 10, the film plays with the “is Tim traumatized or is the monster real?” question. From afar, the idea of a film that leaves you wondering “Is the Boogeyman real?” is fun. But when you’re in it, there’s a moment when you realize that once it’s answered, there’s nothing else to watch for.

  • Dimension Films
    62/ Dimension Films

    #40. Halloween: Resurrection

    Stacker Score: 32.30

    IMDb Rating: 4.1

    Tomatometer: 12%

    Year released: 2002

    The eighth installment in the Halloween franchise, Michael Myers again tries to kill Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis), before heading to his old home to kill the cast members of a reality show being filmed there. This film is incredibly early 2000s, starring both Busta Rhymes and Tyra Banks, but feels a bit inessential after Scream did it better and with more fun. 

  • More Entertainment
    63/ More Entertainment

    #39. House

    Stacker Score: 32.20

    IMDb Rating: 4.6

    Tomatometer: 0%

    Year released: 2008

    Based on a novel by Frank Peretti and Ted Dekker, House tells the story of The Tin Man, a killer who locks seven people in a rustic Alabama inn and tells them he’ll kill them all if they don’t give him a dead body by daybreak. The Tin Man (Michael Madsen) is clearly crazy, claiming to have killed God—he frightens the trapped seven to the point where they consider his offer. This film suffers from too many flashbacks and not enough frights.

  • Phoenix Pictures
    64/ Phoenix Pictures

    #38. Urban Legends: Final Cut

    Stacker Score: 32.10

    IMDb Rating: 4.2

    Tomatometer: 9%

    Year released: 2000

    The sequel to 1998’s Urban Legend, this film moves the myth-inspired deaths from a college campus to film school. The sequel struggles to create the same fun, claustrophobic world of a college campus that made the first one work, and without a star like Jared Leto at the center, it’s a bit rudderless. The film could have worked better if Eva Mendes and Anthony Anderson were given bigger roles. 

  • Hemdale
    65/ Hemdale

    #37. Howling II: ... Your Sister Is a Werewolf

    Stacker Score: 31.90

    IMDb Rating: 3.4

    Tomatometer: 27%

    Year released: 1985

    As stated earlier, the werewolf genre is a tough nut to crack, but the first Howling film is a horror fan favorite. The same cannot be said for the sequel, which sends one-time Dracula Christopher Lee to face off with the queen of the werewolves (Sybil Danning) in where else, Transylvania. The recipe for a much-maligned sequel includes some key ingredients: a loved original, a repetitive story, and the ability to actually degrade the original. Perhaps, an ellipsis in the title should be added to this list, because Howling II… is very bad.

  • Warner Bros.
    66/ Warner Bros.

    #36. Exorcist II: The Heretic

    Stacker Score: 31.90

    IMDb Rating: 3.7

    Tomatometer: 20%

    Year released: 1977

    It was always going to be difficult to follow a true classic, but that doesn’t mean Exorcist II: The Heretic is unfairly maligned. The sequel begins four years after the original, with Regan MacNeil (Linda Blair) seemingly healthy, but perhaps still a bit possessed (if that’s a thing). Richard Burton shows up as a priest investigating Father Merrin’s actions, and hoping for exorcising of his own. This movie is a mess, and somehow the legendary Burton’s portrayal of Father Lamont is the worst part.

  • Artisan Entertainment
    67/ Artisan Entertainment

    #35. Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2

    Stacker Score: 31.90

    IMDb Rating: 4.0

    Tomatometer: 13%

    Year released: 2000

    As they say in the magazine business, three makes a trend—Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2 is the third straight follow-up to much a loved original on this list of terrible horror films. It’s hard to remember now, but The Blair Witch Project was a cultural event. There were questions whether it was scripted, or even if it was actually real. The sequel, which was made incredibly quickly, was never going to have that element of surprise. Instead, it was held up against the truly original first offering—so it never had a chance. 

  • Blumhouse Productions
    68/ Blumhouse Productions

    #34. The Darkness

    Stacker Score: 31.70

    IMDb Rating: 4.4

    Tomatometer: 3%

    Year released: 2016

    When a family awakens a supernatural and vengeful spirit (stop me if you’ve heard this before), they must fight for their survival when it haunts them at home. The cookie-cutter plot is placed in the Grand Canyon this time, and with Kevin Bacon as the father of the family. The movie, financed in part by Blumhouse, was panned by critics, but managed to make money. Lesson: never bet against Jason Blum.

  • Franchise Pictures
    69/ Franchise Pictures

    #33. A Sound of Thunder

    Stacker Score: 31.20

    IMDb Rating: 4.2

    Tomatometer: 6%

    Year released: 2005

    Based on a short story by Ray Bradbury, A Sound of Thunder is more fantasy than horror. Charles Hatton (Ben Kingsley) runs a company called Time Safari that allows big-game hunters to travel back in time to kill dinosaurs. But when a hunter falls and kills a butterfly he unleashes a (wait for it) butterfly effect that changes the course of history. The short story deserves better than this film, which mixes terrible CGI with some questionable acting to turn Bradbury gold into something else entirely.

  • Prototype
    70/ Prototype

    #32. The Devil Inside

    Stacker Score: 31.20

    IMDb Rating: 4.2

    Tomatometer: 6%

    Year released: 2012

    20 years after her mother killed three people and then turned herself in, Isabella (Fernanda Andrade) goes to the mental hospital to understand what really happened that night. As one could guess from the title, she gets some priests involved to attempt an exorcism—but demonic shenanigans ensue. The only reason to watch this film through is to find out exactly why critics hate the ending with such vitriol.

  • Destination Films
    71/ Destination Films

    #31. Bats

    Stacker Score: 31.00

    IMDb Rating: 3.7

    Tomatometer: 17%

    Year released: 1999

    This film is terrible like the rest of the movies on this list—but there should be some special commendation for this specific kind of sweet, simple, unposturing filmmaking. In Bats, a government experiment gone wrong leaves some bats hyper-intelligent, meat-eating, and ready to attack. When they start going after a Texas town, a bat specialist is brought in to save the day. 

  • Planet Productions
    72/ Planet Productions

    #30. Leprechaun 2

    Stacker Score: 30.80

    IMDb Rating: 4.4

    Tomatometer: 0%

    Year released: 1994

    They made so many of these Leprechaun movies—the 90s were a crazy time. In this sequel, an deranged Leprechaun (Warwick Davis) celebrates his 1,000th birthday by choosing a bride. When something messes up their wedding, he starts to kill in his attempt to kidnap her. It’s up to her boyfriend to save the day.

  • Dimension Films
    73/ Dimension Films

    #29. Piranha 3DD

    Stacker Score: 30.80

    IMDb Rating: 3.8

    Tomatometer: 14%

    Year released: 2012

    The first Piranha 3D is a surprisingly self-aware horror-comedy—the sequel is a mess. Rather than attacking Lake Victoria again, the ruthless school of fish has descended upon a waterpark. Spoof is great when it’s perfect, but when it’s anything less it’s tough to watch. The highlight of the film is seeing David Hasselhoff play a lifeguard again.

  • Warner Bros.
    74/ Warner Bros.

    #28. The Wicker Man

    Stacker Score: 30.40

    IMDb Rating: 3.7

    Tomatometer: 15%

    Year released: 2006

    Well, after some calls to The Stacker’s team of wonks, it appears The Wicker Man is not on this list by mistake. Sure, director Neil LaBute’s remake of the 1973 classic is not “good” in a traditional sense—but what does “good” really mean? Is the story of a missing girl and a pagan cult delivered with intelligence? No. Is the direction impressive? Absolutely not. But is Nic Cage at peak Nic Cage? *nods excitedly*

  • Boz Productions
    75/ Boz Productions

    #27. Stan Helsing

    Stacker Score: 30.30

    IMDb Rating: 3.6

    Tomatometer: 17%

    Year released: 2009

    Movies like Stan Helsing are reminders of just how improbable Scary Movie really was. To make a slapstick comedy that’s completely over-the-top, stuffed with hundreds of jokes, and stomach-turningly crude while still being funny is difficult. Stan Helsing, which follows a video clerk descendent of the legendary monster hunter, is an example of what happens when you don’t hit the mark.

  • Canonigo Films
    76/ Canonigo Films

    #26. 11-11-11

    Stacker Score: 30.10

    IMDb Rating: 4.0

    Tomatometer: 7%

    Year released: 2011

    As 11-11-11 reminds us, the only thing more dangerous to be as a horror movie character than a lone teenager is an atheist. In this film, the atheist in question is famed author Joseph Crone (Timothy Gibbs) who travels to Barcelona after the death of his wife and kid and starts to chase down a pattern of mysterious happenings that keep relating to the number 11. This movie came out the week of November 11, 2011—that could be the only explanation for why it was made. 

  • New Line Cinema
    77/ New Line Cinema

    #25. Critters 3

    Stacker Score: 30.10

    IMDb Rating: 4.3

    Tomatometer: 0%

    Year released: 1991

    Somehow, this is the third installment in the Critters extended universe, which follows little balls of fur with sharp teeth (like killer hedgehogs). While the first Critters was a sometimes fun horror-comedy, by the third film—this time at a Los Angeles apartment—the whole thing is nearly insufferable. Interestingly, this is Leonardo DiCaprio’s first film.

  • Level 10 Films
    78/ Level 10 Films

    #24. Smiley

    Stacker Score: 29.90

    IMDb Rating: 3.5

    Tomatometer: 18%

    Year released: 2012

    Another in the genre of “teenage girl tries to dodge a supernatural killer,” the power of Smiley is all in the creepy face director Michael J. Gallagher has given to his Big Bad—a leathery mug with nothing but a stitched smiley face. Now logistically, the fact that the killer has no eyes or nose probably makes him easier to dodge—cutting two important senses out is not a great strategy for a manhunter. But, then again, anyone willing to do that in the first place is not to be messed with. In Smiley, the killer is summoned when someone types “I did it for the lulz” in a chat three times, so at least there were no innocent victims.

  • Alliance
    79/ Alliance

    #23. Prom Night

    Stacker Score: 29.70

    IMDb Rating: 3.9

    Tomatometer: 8%

    Year released: 2008

    A remake of the 1980 film starring Jamie Lee Curtis, Prom Night tells the story of a high school senior stalked by a deranged faculty member. The action begins when freshman Donna (Brittany Snow) witnesses the murder of her family by a teacher who has become obsessed with her. On the night of her senior prom, the teacher breaks out of custody and goes on a rampage to reunite with Donna. This film regurgitates many clichés, while dealing all-around distasteful subject with an embarrassing timidity that undercuts the horror.

  • Warner Bros.
    80/ Warner Bros.

    #22. The Apparition

    Stacker Score: 29.60

    IMDb Rating: 4.1

    Tomatometer: 3%

    Year released: 2012

    In The Apparition, a couple’s home is haunted by a supernatural force that was summoned during a college psych experiment. They work to rid the house of the spirit with the help of an expert—just like in so many other films on this list. The Apparition is predictable and a bit dumb, but worst of all, it’s boring—a major sin in the horror world.

  • Universal Pictures
    81/ Universal Pictures

    #21. Jaws 3-D

    Stacker Score: 28.50

    IMDb Rating: 3.6

    Tomatometer: 11%

    Year released: 1983

    The third in the Jaws franchise, Jaws 3-D was produced in the trendy format to generate some buzz around a flailing series. Also, the action moves to SeaWorld in Orlando, because why the hell not? People truly hate this movie, because the first Jaws was such a magical film—for viewers of a certain generation, this is like making a Citizen Kane sequel where he’s still trying to track down that damn Rosebud... but this time, he’s at Disneyland!

  • Lost Soul Productions
    82/ Lost Soul Productions

    #20. Soul Survivors

    Stacker Score: 28.50

    IMDb Rating: 3.9

    Tomatometer: 4%

    Year released: 2001

    Another film about a young woman attempting to avoid death by supernatural forces, Soul Survivors follows Cassie (Melissa Sagemiller), who survives a car crash and now is haunted. The mix of confusing plot with bad direction ultimately dooms this entry into the overcrowded teenage horror genre. But it’s worth noting that the cast is pretty stacked: Casey Affleck, Eliza Dushku, and Luke Wilson all have supporting roles.

  • Huntington Prep
    83/ Huntington Prep

    #19. The Haunting of Molly Hartley

    Stacker Score: 28.20

    IMDb Rating: 3.9

    Tomatometer: 3%

    Year released: 2008

    The Haunting of Molly Hartley follows a traumatized girl who changes schools, only to be bullied at the new school. Oh, and also, she’s haunted by the supernatural. As noted before, the teen horror genre is not impossible to get right, but clearly it’s easy to get wrong.

  • Empire Pictures
    84/ Empire Pictures

    #18. Ghoulies

    Stacker Score: 28.00

    IMDb Rating: 4.0

    Tomatometer: 0%

    Year released: 1984

    The 1980s were a wild time—it was the decade of Pac-Man, Spandex, and lots and lots of cocaine. Perhaps that’s what led to the financing of Ghoulies, a film about tiny green monsters meant to catch Gremlins-mania runoff. It worked: the film made $35 million.

  • Kushner-Locke Company
    85/ Kushner-Locke Company

    #17. Beowulf

    Stacker Score: 28.00

    IMDb Rating: 4.0

    Tomatometer: 0%

    Year released: 1999

    If you’re a creative who feels like things will never work out, just know: someone once pitched the idea of “Beowulf, but in a post-Apocalyptic future” and received a $3.5 million budget. As you can guess, the Old English epic reimagined in dark future space did not work; most of the horror in this film comes from the fact that it was made at all. 

  • Alcon Entertainment
    86/ Alcon Entertainment

    #16. One Missed Call

    Stacker Score: 28.00

    IMDb Rating: 4.0

    Tomatometer: 0%

    Year released: 2008

    The most terrifying part of One Missed Call’s premise—that people begin receiving voicemails from their future selves detailing the date, time and circumstances of their death—is that many of us are guilty of erasing voicemail messages without listening. Listen, future self, if it’s really important, send a text! Don’t watch the film, but take some time to look at the stills, which prominently feature Ed Burns holding a flip phone.

  • Demarest Films
    87/ Demarest Films

    #15. The Disappointments Room

    Stacker Score: 27.30

    IMDb Rating: 3.9

    Tomatometer: 0%

    Year released: 2016

    The Disappointments Room is yet another haunted house flick. In this entry in the well-trodden genre, Dana (Kate Beckinsale), her husband, and their five-year-old move from Brooklyn to a run-down Southern mansion—soon enough, a supernatural force is bothering the family. Relatedly, any room in which you put this movie on instantly becomes The Disappointed Room.

  • Genre Pictures
    88/ Genre Pictures

    #14. Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Next Generation

    Stacker Score: 27.20

    IMDb Rating: 3.2

    Tomatometer: 16%

    Year released: 1994

    This retelling of the 1974 classic casts Renée Zellweger as the young woman who must continuously fight to survive the bloodthirsty advances of Leatherface and the rest of the Slaughter clan. Matthew McConaughey stars beside Zellweger in what has to be the least romantic and least comedic rom-com of the 1990s. This film would’ve been way better if they made the subtitle How to Lose Your Head in 10 Days.

  • Brouwersgracht Investments
    89/ Brouwersgracht Investments

    #13. Piranha Part Two: The Spawning

    Stacker Score: 26.60

    IMDb Rating: 3.5

    Tomatometer: 7%

    Year released: 1981

    Three years before Terminator, a young Canadian director named James Cameron was brought on to helm the sequel to Piranha. In the killer fish’s second act, the mutant piranhas devastate the waters by a Caribbean resort—and it’s up to a love triangle made up of a police chief, a scuba instructor and a biochemist to save the day. James Cameron, THE James Cameron, made this movie, proving that there is always room for artistic improvement.

  • Revolution Studios
    90/ Revolution Studios

    #12. The Fog

    Stacker Score: 26.40

    IMDb Rating: 3.6

    Tomatometer: 4%

    Year released: 2005

    A remake of the 1980 horror film, The Fog tells the story of a town with a dark past that is haunted by a mist full of nasty spirits. John Carpenter wrote the screenplay for the original film, and Jamie Lee Curtis starred in the movie—but no one involved in the remake comes close to the talents of those two legends.

  • Contend
    91/ Contend

    #11. Cabin Fever

    Stacker Score: 25.90

    IMDb Rating: 3.7

    Tomatometer: 0%

    Year released: 2016

    The original Cabin Fever was released in 2002, which means, by the rules of Spider-Man reboots, it’s not unheard of to restart the series this quickly. However, Cabin Fever 3: Patient Zero (which you may remember from earlier on this list) was released only two years before this reboot. Please, gatekeepers of the movie industry, we’re begging you—cure this fever once and for all!

  • Six Entertainment Company
    92/ Six Entertainment Company

    #10. The Human Centipede III (Final Sequence)

    Stacker Score: 25.00

    IMDb Rating: 2.8

    Tomatometer: 18%

    Year released: 2015

    The movie’s evil-surgeon-gone-way-too-far concept taps into our worst rubbernecking instincts, and naturally Hollywood capitalized on it. But without the shock of the original, it’s just a terrible thing to subject a viewer to.

  • MDP Worldwide
    93/ MDP Worldwide

    #9. Feardotcom

    Stacker Score: 24.00

    IMDb Rating: 3.3

    Tomatometer: 3%

    Year released: 2002

    It never was fully explained to us why this film is called Feardotcom and not Fear.com. The unfortunate title led to some strange marketing around the film, including its riveting tagline: “Feardot.com.” Regardless of the questionable branding, Feardotcom tells the story of an investigation into the death of four people who all logged onto a website (either Fear.com or Feardot.com, or maybe even Feardotcom.com). Sure that site kills you, but it’s not close to as scary as checking your mentions on Twitterdotcom.

  • Boll Kino Beteiligungs GmbH & Co. KG
    94/ Boll Kino Beteiligungs GmbH & Co. KG

    #8. BloodRayne

    Stacker Score: 21.50

    IMDb Rating: 2.9

    Tomatometer: 4%

    Year released: 2005

    BloodRayne follows Rayne (Kristanna Loken), a vampire who escapes from an 18th-century freakshow to join a team of vampire slayers. This is a much worse version of Blade, but somehow got two sequels.

  • Filmirage
    95/ Filmirage

    #7. Troll 2

    Stacker Score: 21.40

    IMDb Rating: 2.8

    Tomatometer: 6%

    Year released: 1990

    Considered one of the worst movies of all time, Troll 2 is about a young boy who tries to convince his family that the trolls from his grandfather’s stories are real. Child actor Michael Paul Stephenson stars as Joshua, and later made a critically acclaimed documentary about the terrible cult classic called Best Worst Movie. Parents, please take note: this is not the sequel to Dreamworks’ Trolls.

  • Dimension Films
    96/ Dimension Films

    #6. The Crow: Wicked Prayer

    Stacker Score: 21.00

    IMDb Rating: 3.0

    Tomatometer: 0%

    Year released: 2005

    This remake of The Crow, the film in which Bruce Lee’s son Brandon was tragically killed on set, stars Edward Furlong. This time, after being killed by gang leaders Lola Byrne (Tara Reid) and Luc Crash (the guy from Bones), the Crow returns Jimmy Cuervo (Furlong) to life—and he wants vengeance. This movie is ultra-violent and ultra-stupid.

  • Universal Pictures
    97/ Universal Pictures

    #5. Jaws: The Revenge

    Stacker Score: 20.30

    IMDb Rating: 2.9

    Tomatometer: 0%

    Year released: 1987

    The fourth Jaws is a special kind of stupid—the Brody boys have left SeaWorld and returned to Amity where their mom still lives. But guess who wants revenge? A shark, that’s who. A vengeful shark. Who somehow can sense that these people are related, and are the ones to kill. The shark knows all this. He has human feelings. Did I mention this movie is dumb?

  • Expedition Films
    98/ Expedition Films

    #4. Birdemic: Shock and Terror

    Stacker Score: 18.30

    IMDb Rating: 1.8

    Tomatometer: 19%

    Year released: 2010

    Sure, some filmmakers would shy away from making a horror film about killer birds along California’s northern coast, but director James Nguyen does not fear walking in Alfred Hitchcock’s footprints. That’s what makes this truly horrible movie so enjoyable—the magic of Ed Wood and Tommy Wiseau is their sincerity. Nguyen seems to really believe in his bird movie, and it deserves a watch on the strength of the title alone. 

  • AITD Productions
    99/ AITD Productions

    #3. Alone in the Dark

    Stacker Score: 16.40

    IMDb Rating: 2.3

    Tomatometer: 1%

    Year released: 2005

    In this mess of a movie, paranormal detective Edward Carnby (Christian Slater) must team up with an anthropologist with a photographic memory (Tara Reid) to stop evil demons from taking over the Earth. Worst of all for Carby, the anthropologist is his ex-girlfriend, because of course she is.

  • Norm-Iris
    100/ Norm-Iris

    #2. Manos: The Hands of Fate

    Stacker Score: 15.40

    IMDb Rating: 1.9

    Tomatometer: 7%

    Year released: 1966

    Perhaps this 60s movie doesn’t hold up in your late-capitalist, authoritarian, tech-obsessed world, man, but Manos: The Hands of Fate was different and special and transgressive, man. Expand your mind wide enough to imagine a lost family who ends up at a shack managed by a cult that worships a hand. 

  • Boll Kino Beteiligungs GmbH & Co. KG
    101/ Boll Kino Beteiligungs GmbH & Co. KG

    #1. House of the Dead

    Stacker Score: 14.90

    IMDb Rating: 2.0

    Tomatometer: 3%

    Year released: 2003

    Impressively, director Uwe Boll managed to get three films in the top eight of our list (the German director was also responsible (or maybe, to blame) for BloodRayne and Alone in the Dark). In House of the Dead, a group of ravers have their drug-aided island dance party interrupted by all sorts of monsters looking for blood. Incredibly, Boll gets his films financed on the same planet where Vincent Van Gogh died in poverty—go figure.

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