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How snowfall levels have changed across 100 U.S. cities

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How snowfall levels have changed in 100 U.S. cities

It’s easy to wonder anecdotally if winters are warmer, milder, or otherwise being affected by climate change, but where in the United States has annual snowfall changed the most? To find answers, look at the data. In a 2020 report titled “The Case of the Shifting Snow,” researchers from the nonprofit climate communication organization Climate Central identified how snowfall patterns have changed in 143 American cities that receive annual snowfall of at least 5 inches.

Using data from the Applied Climate Information System, these researchers compared cities’ annual and seasonal snowfall across two decades: 1970 to 1979 and 2010 to 2019. It excluded any cities that were missing more than two years of data across these two decades from the annual analysis, and excluded any cities that were missing more than 20% of data for any season during the study period from the seasonal analysis.

In this story, Stacker highlights the snowfall changes in 100 of those 143 cities, all of which have populations greater than 15,000 (identified using 2018 censusdata). The cities are ranked here according to their percent change in snowfall, from the city that had the most snowfall gain across this 50-year period to the city that had the most snowfall loss. These range from absolutely snow-buried cities like Buffalo and Utica in New York to places in the South and Northwest with almost no snow. Some of these cities have economies that rely pretty explicitly on the annual snowfall in their areas: In ski resort regions, business owners are scrambling to make up the difference in naturally occurring snow.

Which of these cities is closest to you? Locations with huge increases and decreases may surprise you. Overall, 37 cities on this list had more snowfall in the 2010s than the 1970s, while 62 cities had more snowfall in the 1970s.

You may also like: 50 ways the weather could change in the next 50 years

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#100. New York

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 14.7 inches (66.22%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 22.2 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 36.9 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 1.7 inches
--- Winter: 12.9 inches
--- Spring: 4.9 inches

New York City is surrounded and threaded through by different bodies of water, which could mean a variety of climate shifts are heightened by ocean-effect snow and even ice nucleation from heavy airplane traffic. Fortunately, most of New York’s subway is underground, but surface traffic is gummed up by every big snowfall and slows down the city.

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#99. Newark, New Jersey

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 12.74 inches (51.04%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 24.96 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 37.7 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 2.3 inches
--- Winter: 11.2 inches
--- Spring: 4.3 inches

One of the most famous Newark, New Jersey, stories involves Sen. Cory Booker, once the mayor, who loved to help people in his city shovel snow. It was a North Pole-arizing action that many constituents loved, but many others felt was a delegation mismatch for their leader. Objectively, shoveling is the worst, so an increase of more than 12 inches a year could mean a bright future for shovel-loving politicians.

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#98. Odessa, Texas

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 1.75 inches (42.58%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 4.11 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 5.86 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.3 inches
--- Winter: 1.1 inches
--- Spring: -1.5 inches

Odessa, Texas, is the famous setting of the original book and movie version of “Friday Night Lights,” where a tiny amount of yearly snowfall has increased by more than 40% since the 1970s. For cities in areas with rare snowfall, it’s usually enough to bring the whole area to a standstill without the right equipment, or even a supply of salt or sand for the roads.

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Atwngirl // Wikimedia Commons

#97. Allentown, Pennsylvania

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 10.65 inches (38.45%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 27.7 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 38.35 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 0.7 inches
--- Winter: 6.3 inches
--- Spring: 4.6 inches

The near 40% increase in snowfall in Allentown, Pennsylvania, works out to be more than 10 inches, enough to change how quickly cars are affected by exposure to salt during and to cause extra wear and tear to public structures. Fortunately, as part of the well-populated eastern end of Pennsylvania, the city is probably prepared to take on snow removal more than some other places.

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Michael Candelori // Shutterstock

#96. Philadelphia

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 7.96 inches (36.89%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 21.58 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 29.54 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.4 inches
--- Winter: 6.3 inches
--- Spring: 0.3 inches

Just a stone’s throw from Allentown, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia has less snowfall overall and a slightly smaller increase year over year. Philadelphia is one of the oldest cities in the United States and was the first capital, and tourism plays a big part in its economy. Traffic from every schoolchild in a 100-mile radius making a pilgrimage to the Liberty Bell is hopefully enough to make up for any lost wintertime revenues.

You may also like: How weather has shaped human history

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#95. Youngstown, Ohio

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 19.75 inches (36.05%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 54.78 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 74.53 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 0.1 inches
--- Winter: 25.6 inches
--- Spring: 1.6 inches

The Rust Belt’s own Youngstown, Ohio, may be best known today as the namesake of a second-tier boy band whose members named themselves after their hometown. Youngstown isn’t far from Lake Erie and has experienced pretty high snowfall for a long time, but a 36% increase means nearly 20 more inches per year. That's more than enough to inconvenience people or even trap them in their homes if enough falls at one time.

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#94. Wilmington, Delaware

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s– 2010s: 6.54 inches (34.84%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 18.77 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 25.31 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.5 inches
--- Winter: 5.8 inches
--- Spring: 2.8 inches

Wilmington, Delaware, is the birthplace of actress Aubrey Plaza, and despite a reputation for crime, the city is safer now than ever. Colder, snowier weather can stanch crime the same way hot weather can exacerbate it, so maybe Wilmington is feeling the cool in more ways than one. The nearly 35% jump up to 25 inches of annual snowfall is likely increased by the city’s coastal side. Delaware has a sheltered eastern coast that’s supplied by the Atlantic Ocean and by the several rivers that flow near Wilmington.

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#93. Norfolk, Virginia

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 2.42 inches (33.38%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 7.25 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 9.67 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 0 inches
--- Winter: -0.3 inches
--- Spring: -3.7 inches

Norfolk, Virginia, was founded near the original Jamestown colony in the very early 1600s. It’s another city surrounded by bodies of water that can create a snow effect, bringing precipitation. Because of its location, Norfolk is experiencing rising sea levels and increased flooding, making even a small change in the amount of snowfall—more than 33%, which is almost 2.5 inches locally—a big nuisance.

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Sdgjake // Wikimedia Commons

#92. Sioux Falls, South Dakota

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 10.9 inches (31.34%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 34.78 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 45.68 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1.5 inches
--- Winter: 12.7 inches
--- Spring: 1.7 inches

Sioux Falls, South Dakota, is already a city prepared for winter, with local festivals like Winterfest and the Sno Jam Comedy Festival. But a 31% increase—up to nearly 46 inches—of annual snowfall is still a big change and would require the city or state to cough up more money for resources. Fortunately, having the infrastructure in place means these costs are probably minimal compared to some of the warmer, drier places on this list.

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Leif Kurth // Flickr

#91. Baltimore

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 5.16 inches (30.48%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 16.93 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 22.09 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.9 inches
--- Winter: 4.2 inches
--- Spring: 1.5 inches

With a more than 30% increase in snowfall, coastal Baltimore is experiencing an even greater snow-related traffic crunch. It already has the worst drivers in the nation according to Allstate, and the local habits of double- and triple-parking can only be more frustrating in the snow. Triple park your car and take the bus instead.

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#90. Cheyenne, Wyoming

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 14.28 inches (25.16%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 56.76 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 71.04 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 1.7 inches
--- Winter: 10.1 inches
--- Spring: 2.5 inches

At more than 6,000 feet above sea level, cold and sparse Cheyenne, Wyoming, is higher than the Mile-High City of Denver. Its annual snowfall has increased more than 25%—up to 71 inches per year—which might be a boon for surrounding ski and snowboard resorts but is still a pain in a regular city where people go to work and live their everyday lives.

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#89. Waterloo, Iowa

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 7.89 inches (22.59%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 34.92 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 42.81 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.6 inches
--- Winter: 13.2 inches
--- Spring: -2.3 inches

Waterloo, Iowa, is a small city in the middle of the state that is relatively landlocked and protected from water effects on snow. Even so, the snowfall has increased almost 23%, from just under 35 inches in the 1970s to just under 43 inches today. That’s a lot more snow to remove.

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#88. Wausau, Wisconsin

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 12.23 inches (22.48%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 54.41 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 66.64 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1.8 inches
--- Winter: 11.5 inches
--- Spring: 4 inches

Snowy Wausau, Wisconsin, has experienced a 22.5% increase in annual snowfall, which might be a good thing for nearby Granite Peak Ski Area, but it is just more snow for the folks in town. That can present a unique problem—or an opportunity. In February, the local crime blotter reported that police received a call from a woman having an innocuous argument with her brother’s neighbor who “then got a snowblower and blew snow from a ditch into the caller's brother's yard.”

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#87. Little Rock, Arkansas

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 1.21 inches (21.65%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 5.59 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 6.8 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.9 inches
--- Winter: 0.5 inches
--- Spring: -0.5 inches

The capital city of Little Rock, Arkansas, receives so little snow annually that an increase of about an inch makes it one of the proportionally largest bumps on the list. From just under 6 inches in the 1970s to just under 7 inches today—a change of just more than 1 inch—means nearly 22% higher snowfall.

You may also like: How climate change has affected each state

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Jef Nickerson // Flickr

#86. Providence, Rhode Island

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 7.1 inches (21.02%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 33.77 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 40.87 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.7 inches
--- Winter: 10 inches
--- Spring: 0.7 inches

Providence, Rhode Island, is home to an eclectic blend of historically working-class coastal people, elite university students, and a wild selection of artists and performers. The city’s proximity to water—in fact, the entire state of Rhode Island’s proximity to water—makes the snow worse due to ocean effect.

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#85. Boston

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 9.06 inches (20.8%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 43.55 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 52.61 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1 inches
--- Winter: 14.6 inches
--- Spring: 2.8 inches

Boston’s almost 21% snowfall increase represents 9 inches of snow each year. In one of the nation’s oldest cities, the road system is already chaotic and more like the most European-seeming East Coast cities than the neat straight lines in the rest of the United States. At least the Big Dig is finally finished.

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Slashinme // Wikimedia Commons

#84. Bangor, Maine

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 12.48 inches (17.69%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 70.53 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 83.01 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 3.7 inches
--- Winter: 11.5 inches
--- Spring: -1.5 inches

Bangor, Maine, is famous as one of the many settings favored by horror legend and cringe-boomer Twitter star Stephen King. This small city isn’t on the coast, but is part of the same climate group that drops tons of snow on the Maritimes of Canada. Bangor’s snow has increased nearly 18%, but in local inches that’s more than a foot each year.

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John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty

#83. Mansfield, Massachusetts

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 6.85 inches (16.02%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 42.76 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 49.61 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.7 inches
--- Winter: 12.3 inches
--- Spring: 2.9 inches

Mansfield, Massachusetts has historically seen heavy snowfall, enough that residents of this small city face a ban on overnight parking in the downtown business district from December to April each year to keep the streets fully clear for snowplows. But the snow in Mansfield is starting early and piling up more than before in recent years; in 2018, the first snowfall of the winter hit before Thanksgiving.

Note: this has been updated to reflect Mansfield, Massachusetts, an original version referred to Mansfield, Texas.

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Anjecreek // Wikimedia Commons

#82. Erie, Pennsylvania

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 12.89 inches (14.71%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 87.63 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 100.52 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1.4 inches
--- Winter: 26.3 inches
--- Spring: 6.5 inches

As its name suggests, Erie, Pennsylvania, is on the coast of Lake Erie in the northwestern corner of the state. Like nearby Buffalo, New York, the lake-effect snow drops powerfully on Erie each year, going up nearly 15% to more than 100 inches annually. That’s as high as many people’s room ceilings and certainly enough to cover all but the most oversized front doors.

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#81. Great Falls, Montana

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 9.25 inches (13.96%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 66.25 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 75.5 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 4.3 inches
--- Winter: 11 inches
--- Spring: -3.9 inches

Great Falls, Montana, has experienced an increase in annual snowfall of nearly 14%. From just more than 66 inches per year, the city now receives more than 75 inches annually: enough to completely cover a person who’s 6-foot-2 with a full inch to spare.

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Jerry Huddleston // Flickr

#80. Bismarck, North Dakota

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 5.98 inches (13.67%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 43.75 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 49.73 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1.1 inches
--- Winter: 5.6 inches
--- Spring: -0.3 inches

Icy cold Bismarck, North Dakota, the state’s capital, has experienced an increase of nearly 14% in its rate of annual snowfall. This means the snow has gone up from just under 44 inches to just under 50 inches annually. In Bismarck, this likely means more days when it’s warmer than it has been in the past—warm enough for snow to fall, counterintuitively enough.

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#79. Idaho Falls, Idaho

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 3.5 inches (13.34%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 26.23 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 29.73 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.6 inches
--- Winter: 8.5 inches
--- Spring: 2.1 inches

Idaho Falls, Idaho, is between the mountains and the drier expanse of the arid northern Midwest, with a moderate amount of snow that reflects this. Snowfall in Idaho Falls has increased more than 13%, from just more than 26 inches to just less than 30 inches.

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#78. Duluth, Minnesota

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 9.97 inches (12.73%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 78.34 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 88.31 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.7 inches
--- Winter: 4.7 inches
--- Spring: 5.8 inches

Duluth, Minnesota, receives a large amount of snow each year, and that number has only increased—from just more than 78 inches to just more than 88 inches today, which translates to an increase of just under 13% overall. As in other frigid places, the increase is likely because the temperature has riseninto the right range for snow on more days each winter.

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Obama White House // Flickr

#77. Washington D.C.

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 1.64 inches (11.77%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 13.93 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 15.57 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1.4 inches
--- Winter: -1 inches
--- Spring: 0.9 inches

Washington D.C. doesn’t get a lot of snow, but anything more than a dribble at a time can be a big problem in a city that’s both not accustomed to snow and the seat of our federal government. Since it isn’t part of any particular state, its snow response is specifically local. The combination of some of the worst traffic in the United States and no district representation in Congress is a double whammy for future snow days.

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#76. Pittsburgh

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 4.81 inches (10.79%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 44.56 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 49.37 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.6 inches
--- Winter: 7 inches
--- Spring: -1.8 inches

Pittsburgh boasts a longtime professional sports stadium that is aptly named for the three rivers that run through the city, which is close enough to the Great Lakes to receive nearly 50 inches of lake-effect snow annually. That’s a greater than 10% increase since 1970. For a city that has bridges running across the rivers, and is one of the best places to cycle, more snow can only mean more dangerous ice and bike-unfriendly road conditions.

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#75. Richmond, Virginia

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 1.16 inches (10.65%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 10.89 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 12.05 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.3 inches
--- Winter: -2.4 inches
--- Spring: -1.4 inches

The onetime capital of the Confederacy, Richmond, Virginia, receives very little snow each year, to the point where an increase of an inch means nearly an 11% increase. In other words, the total snowfall has grown from just under 11 inches to greater than 12 inches today.

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#74. Detroit

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 4.33 inches (9.51%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 45.55 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 49.88 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1.3 inches
--- Winter: 10.5 inches
--- Spring: -2 inches

Detroit is in the news for both its dramatic depopulation since its economy crashed decades ago, and for the vibrant and revitalizing arts and startup scenes trying to bring back the city. But with empty roads meant to accommodate a population many times larger, the city is painted into a corner for snow removal resources. Even a slight increase in annual snowfall could mean big trouble for the Motor City.

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#73. Hartford, Connecticut

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 3.45 inches (7.26%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 47.55 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 51 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 1.7 inches
--- Winter: 6.8 inches
--- Spring: 1.2 inches

Hartford, Connecticut had a reputation as being one of America’s most dangerous cities, but crime in general and murder in particular have fallen in recent years, giving residents hope that the city has turned a corner. The amount of snowfall has increased just over 7% in the ACIS study, from just under 48 inches to 51 inches today.

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Mark Baldwin // Shutterstock

#72. Green Bay, Wisconsin

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 4 inches (7.09%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 56.43 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 60.43 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -3.4 inches
--- Winter: 11.4 inches
--- Spring: 2.5 inches

Green Bay, Wisconsin, is cold in climate but warm in spirit, with a midsize population that rallies around its shared ownership of the National Football League’s Green Bay Packers. With just a 7% increase in snowfall, Green Bay tips gently over the 60-inch threshold. For a group of people that spends winters on the bleachers, the change is minimal.

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#71. Fargo, North Dakota

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 2.68 inches (6.1%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 43.91 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 46.59 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1.6 inches
--- Winter: 5.3 inches
--- Spring: 4.9 inches

Try to imagine Joel and Ethan Coen’s classic movie “Fargo” without the ubiquitous snow—the physical and auditory blanketing is such a big part of the movie’s atmosphere. Indeed, snowfall in Fargo, Dakota, has increased slightly, from just under 44 inches annually to just under 47 inches today. That’s a total increase of slightly more than 6%. No word on whether that means anything for the dead trooper.

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Shenandoah National Park // Flickr

#70. Harrisonburg, Virginia

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 1.17 inches (5.66%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 20.68 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 21.85 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -2.7 inches
--- Winter: -1.5 inches
--- Spring: 2.4 inches

The low to moderate snowfall in Harrisonburg, Virginia, has changed very little throughout the decades. From just under 21 inches annually in the 1970s, that number has increased to just below 22 inches today, or an increase of just slightly below 6%.

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#69. Minneapolis-St. Paul

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 1.87 inches (3.55%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 52.68 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 54.55 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -7.1 inches
--- Winter: 0.2 inches
--- Spring: 0.1 inches

Snowfall in Minneapolis-St. Paul, or more commonly known as the Twin Cities, has stayed pretty steady, with an increase of about 3.5% since the 1970s, or under 2 inches of snowfall each year. The difference between 52 inches and 54 inches annually is minimal, as is the impact, but the Twin Cities are pretty isolated from the factors that have accelerated the change in other regions.

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#68. Anchorage, Alaska

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 1.7 inches (2.47%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 68.75 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 70.45 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -4.5 inches
--- Winter: 19 inches
--- Spring: -2 inches

Anchorage, Alaska, is by far the largest city in the state, nearly 10 times larger than the second-largest city of Fairbanks and 30 times larger than fourth-place Sitka. Because of its placement in the state, Anchorage is much milder than the almost empty northern half, or even two-thirds, of the state. Its residents live daily lives more like Minnesotans than the primarily Alaska Native or even military communities further north.

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#67. Madison, Wisconsin

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 1.14 inches (2.39%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 47.78 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 48.92 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 0.1 inches
--- Winter: 11.6 inches
--- Spring: -3.9 inches

Scenic Madison, Wisconsin, is surrounded by and interspersed with four different lakes, but its annual snowfall has stayed almost the same, with an increase of just over 2%, which represents about 1 inch of snow. This is business as usual in the midsize capital city that’s the second-largest in Wisconsin, but it’s always prepared and issues snow emergency alerts when necessary.

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#66. Columbus, Ohio

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 0.39 inches (1.3%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 29.93 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 30.32 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.4 inches
--- Winter: 3.2 inches
--- Spring: -1.3 inches

People from Columbus, Ohio, joke that others think they’re from everywhere else in Ohio, maybe because multiple cities in the state start with a “C.” Columbus receives a medium amount of snow that has changed very little, from just below 30 inches to just above 30 inches, making a barely detectable change of just above 1% throughout the decades.

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#65. Lafayette, Indiana

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 0.22 inches (0.86%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 25.55 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 25.77 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.8 inches
--- Winter: -2.1 inches
--- Spring: -0.9 inches

Annual snowfall in Lafayette, Indiana, hasn’t changed, staying almost completely still between 25.5 inches and 26 inches. That means the total change is less than 1%. Lafayette is very near the neighboring home of Purdue University, which is located in West Lafayette.

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USFWS Midwest Region // Flickr

#64. La Crosse-Eau Claire, Wisconsin

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 0.28 inches (0.62%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 45.43 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 45.71 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1.5 inches
--- Winter: 4.5 inches
--- Spring: 2.1 inches

If people have heard of La Crosse, Wisconsin, it’s usually for winter sports since the area is home to great skiing and snowmobiling. Just 71 miles north of La Crosse, Eau Claire, is home to a branch of the University of Wisconsin higher education system. Both have experienced an almost negligible change in snowfall, from just below 45.5 inches to just above 45.5 inches. The total difference is just over 0.50%.

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Oteo // Flickr

#63. Asheville, North Carolina

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: 0 inches (0%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 14.99 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 14.99 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.8 inches
--- Winter: -2.8 inches
--- Spring: -1.9 inches

Asheville, North Carolina, has a special distinction as the only city on the ACIS list with a nonexistent difference down to the nearest hundredth of an inch, ora percent. Its snowfall has stayed steady at 14.99 inches per year.

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LouisvilleUSACE // Flickr

#62. Bowling Green, Kentucky

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -0.01 inches (-0.08%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 12.53 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 12.52 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.5 inches
--- Winter: -3.6 inches
--- Spring: 1 inches

Bowling Green, Kentucky, receives very little snow and has experienced very little change in annual accumulation, from about 12.5 inches to 12.5 inches again, with a tiny hundredth of a change that amounts to a fraction more than 0% change.

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#61. Utica, New York (tie)

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -0.39 inches (-0.33%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 119.83 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 119.44 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -2.3 inches
--- Winter: 15.1 inches
--- Spring: -3.3 inches

Utica, New York, is the unsung middle child to fellow snow-riddled Empire State cities Buffalo and Rochester. Utica’s annual snowfall hasn’t really changed, staying at exactly the extraordinary measurement where it began. That means nearly 120 inches annually in the 1970s and just a few tenths of an inch less today, for a total change of -0.33%.

Note: Utica and Syracuse share a National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) market and thus have identical snowfall data.

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#61. Syracuse, New York (tie)

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -0.39 inches (-0.33%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 119.83 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 119.44 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -2.3 inches
--- Winter: 15.1 inches
--- Spring: -3.3 inches

Like Utica, Syracuse, New York, experiences extraordinary snowfall that virtually hasn’t changed—from almost 120 inches to just over 119 inches per year, making a total change of less than 0.50%. That’s literally 10 feet of snowfall each year: a number that’s hard to even imagine if you haven’t experienced it.

Note: Utica and Syracuse share a NOAA market and thus have identical snowfall data.

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#59. Fort Wayne, Indiana

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -0.13 inches (-0.36%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 36.5 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 36.37 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -2.3 inches
--- Winter: 2.3 inches
--- Spring: -1.8 inches

Fort Wayne, in northern Indiana, receives a moderate amount of snow annually that has changed very little. In the 1970s, that number was 36.5 inches. Today, it’s about one-tenth of an inch less, meaning it’s changed -0.36%.

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Corey Balazowich // Flickr

#58. Canton, Ohio

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -0.31 inches (-0.62%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 50.01 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 49.7 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1.5 inches
--- Winter: 4.3 inches
--- Spring: -2.5 inches

Canton, Ohio’s, medium snowfall hasn’t changed, going from 50 inches in the 1970s to just under 50 inches today. That’s a total reduction of just over 0.50%. Canton made news in the past decade for legalizing open consumption of alcohol, joining so-called “party cities” like New Orleans. The combination of high snowfall and outdoor consumption seems, well, like a super smart idea, of course.

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#57. Flint, Michigan

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -0.55 inches (-0.95%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 57.96 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 57.41 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 0.2 inches
--- Winter: 12.5 inches
--- Spring: -5.1 inches

Beleaguered Flint, Michigan, has big problems that have most recently included the poisonous local water supply, so in a sense, it’s a relief that its climate is basically the same with no bad news. The local snowfall has decreased from just under 58 inches to just over 57 inches, a change of just under 1%.

You may also like: Counties with the fastest-falling population in every state

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Yohey1028 // Wikimedia Commons

#56. Binghamton, New York

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -1.03 inches (-1.23%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 84.04 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 83.01 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 1.5 inches
--- Winter: 0.5 inches
--- Spring: 0.9 inches

Binghamton, New York, receives quite a bit of snow that has neither increased nor decreased annually. From almost exactly 84 inches to almost exactly 83 inches today is a total decrease of about 1%. In December 2019, Winter Storm Ezekiel dropped about a foot of snow on Binghamton and left residents digging out on their snow day.

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Wizard298 // Flickr

#55. Peoria, Illinois

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -0.43 inches (-1.38%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 31.12 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 30.69 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 0.1 inches
--- Winter: 1.8 inches
--- Spring: -1.9 inches

Snowfall in Peoria hasn't changed much in the past 50 years; like in other parts of Illinois and neighboring midwest states, this city faces winter storms combining snow, wind, and freezing rain. One such storm in January 2019 set a record in the city, with 10.7 inches of snow recorded in a single day.

Note: this has been updated to reflect Peoria, Illinois, an original version referred to Peoria, Arizona.

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Kenneth Zirkel // Wikimedia Commons

#54. Portland, Maine

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -1.24 inches (-1.62%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 76.56 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 75.32 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.5 inches
--- Winter: 5.3 inches
--- Spring: -1.3 inches

Portland, Maine, is the largest city in the state, and a growing destination for food tourists seeking authentic lobster rolls and even lobster benedict. The climate is quite cold and snowy, but there’s been almost no change since the 1970s. With almost 77 inches of snowfall then and just over 75 inches now, the change is about 1.5%.

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Bureau of Land Management Montana and Dakota // Flickr

#53. Billings, Montana

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -1.95 inches (-3%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 65.07 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 63.12 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -4.4 inches
--- Winter: 11 inches
--- Spring: -8.8 inches

Billings, Montana, receives a large amount of snow because of its close proximity to the mountainous areas in the south and west of the state. That number, however, has fallen 3% from just over 65 inches to just over 63 inches annually. Billings has made the news in recent decades for its role in the fracking boom.

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David Ohmer // Flickr

#52. Cincinnati

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -0.82 inches (-3.1%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 26.46 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 25.64 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1.4 inches
--- Winter: 3.7 inches
--- Spring: -1 inches

Mild and seasonal Cincinnati receives a low to moderate amount of snow that has not really changed. In the 1970s, the city received just over 26 inches, and in the 2010s, it received just under 26, making for a change of just more than 3%. And while Skyline Chili might sound like a winter food, it’s popular, especially with tourists, year-round.

You may also like: Best parks in Cincinnati

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Joquinn77 // Wikimedia Commons

#51. Lynchburg, Virginia

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -0.57 inches (-3.59%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 15.86 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 15.29 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1.8 inches
--- Winter: -4.9 inches
--- Spring: -0.9 inches

Lynchburg, Virginia, has dubious distinctions like being the only major Virginia city never captured by the Union army, and the current home of televangelist and archconservative Jerry Falwell’s Liberty University. Lynchburg receives a small amount of snow that has decreased a bit, from just under 16 inches to just over 15 inches, representing a change of just under 4%.

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#50. Concord, New Hampshire

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -2.81 inches (-3.88%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 72.47 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 69.66 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -2.7 inches
--- Winter: 5 inches
--- Spring: 1.2 inches

Like the rest of the far Northeast, Concord receives quite a bit of snow, and this number has barely changed at all since the 1970s. From more than 72 inches annually then, Concord now receives just under 70 inches, making the change just under 4%.

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Christian Collins // Flickr

#49. Saginaw, Michigan

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -2.03 inches (-4.07%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 49.85 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 47.82 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 0.7 inches
--- Winter: 15 inches
--- Spring: -7.5 inches

Struggling Saginaw, Michigan, has seen a declining population and has experienced high crime in the past decade. One thing that has hardly changed at all, however, is the snowfall, which has fallen 4% from about 50 inches to about 48 inches annually. This is partly because of Saginaw’s inland location that experiences less lake-effect weather.

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Katie Haugland Bowen // Flickr

#48. Des Moines, Iowa

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -1.69 inches (-4.43%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 38.12 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 36.43 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -2.3 inches
--- Winter: 8.2 inches
--- Spring: -4.3 inches

Des Moines receives a moderate amount of snow that has decreased slightly throughout the years. With a change from just over 38 inches to just over 36 inches, that’s a change of just over 4%. The Des Moines Register released a list of words only Iowans know how to pronounce, including Des Moines (duh-moyn), which means “the monks” in French.

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#47. Manchester, New Hampshire

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -3 inches (-4.81%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 62.41 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 59.41 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -4 inches
--- Winter: -2.9 inches
--- Spring: -1.2 inches

Manchester, New Hampshire, is the home of fictional president Josiah Bartlet, whose insistence on folksy self-reliance despite his London School of Economics education is one of the interesting tensions on “The West Wing.” Manchester receives a fair amount of snow that has changed little, dropping just under 5% from about 62 inches to about 59 inches.

You may also like: Best places to live in every state

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Kate Brady // Flickr

#46. Missoula, Montana

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -2.79 inches (-5.39%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 51.76 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 48.97 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -2.8 inches
--- Winter: 3.9 inches
--- Spring: -4 inches

Missoula, Montana, receives quite a bit of snow, and that number has gone down a bit in recent decades. In the 1970s, Missoula received just under 52 inches of snow per year. Today, that number has fallen 5% to under 50 inches per year.

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Michael Lucas // Flickr

#45. Rockford, Illinois

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -2.61 inches (-6.37%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 40.97 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 38.36 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 0.9 inches
--- Winter: 4.3 inches
--- Spring: -4.3 inches

Snowfall in Rockford, Illinois, is somewhere between that of Chicago to the east and Champaign to the south, with little change since the 1970s. It has experienced just under 41 inches of snowfall per year then and just over 38 inches today. Regardless of snowfall measurements, Rockford loves a four-wheel-drive vehicle year-round, and the nearby Belvidere Assembly Plant has made various models of cars, trucks, and sport utility vehicles throughout the years.

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Erik Drost // Wikimedia Commons

#44. Cleveland

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -4.01 inches (-7.03%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 57.07 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 53.06 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -2.6 inches
--- Winter: 3.5 inches
--- Spring: 0.3 inches

Cleveland’s place in northern Ohio puts it closer to the lake-effect weather experienced by other Great Lakes cities in the Midwest and Northeast. That means its snowfall has gone from 57 inches in the 1970s to just over 53 inches today, for a decrease of 7%.

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Qsthomson // Wikimedia Commons

#43. Indianapolis

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -2.44 inches (-8.45%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 28.87 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 26.43 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1.5 inches
--- Winter: -2 inches
--- Spring: 0.7 inches

Indianapolis’ low to moderate annual snowfall has decreased since the 1970s. From just under 29 inches then, the number has fallen about 8.5% to just over 26 inches. Indianapolis is very, very flat and spread out, meaning it’s probably still easy to get around on wide streets even during a relatively heavy snowfall.

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#42. Burlington, Vermont

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -7.85 inches (-8.46%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 92.8 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 84.95 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -2.4 inches
--- Winter: 1.9 inches
--- Spring: -1 inches

Sen. Bernie Sanders and the Emily Post Institute are both based in Burlington, Vermont, a college town with about 40,000 residents that’s nonetheless the largest city in the state. Its plentiful annual snowfall has dropped just over 8%, from almost 93 inches to just under 85 inches. It’s not a big change, but Burlington is surrounded by ski and snowboard resorts, and is even home to the global headquarters for Burton Snowboards.

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Bob Dilworth // Flickr

#41. Toledo, Ohio

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -3.76 inches (-9.16%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 41.05 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 37.29 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1 inches
--- Winter: 2.1 inches
--- Spring: -1.2 inches

The famous home of Cpl. Max Klinger and Casey’s Mud Hens receives a moderate amount of snow that’s gone down more than 9% since the 1970s. That’s a difference from 41 inches to 37 inches, which could mean starting spring training a few days earlier.

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#40. Rochester, New York

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -10.08 inches (-9.38%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 107.42 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 97.34 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 1.6 inches
--- Winter: -3.7 inches
--- Spring: -0.3 inches

Rochester, New York, is nationally famous for its wild photos of 20-foot snowdrifts and the largest numbers on the snowfall map. Now, Rochester is facing the fact that its regularly huge annual snowfall has dropped below 100 inches per year. The number has dropped to just over 9%, from more than 107 inches in the 1970s to just over 97 inches now.

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SD Dirk // Flickr

#39. Dubuque, Iowa

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -4.58 inches (-9.39%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 48.76 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 44.18 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1.2 inches
--- Winter: 7.1 inches
--- Spring: -7.8 inches

Dubuque, Iowa, is a midsize boomtown of sorts, just over the Mississippi River from the tiny, longtime home of Ulysses S. Grant in far northwestern Illinois. The snowfall there has declined from a plentiful 49 inches per year to just over 44 inches, representing a whole reduction of just over 9%. With colleges, new businesses, and a rapidly growing economy, Dubuque is unlikely to notice.

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#38. Amarillo, Texas

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -1.78 inches (-10.34%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 17.21 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 15.43 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1.1 inches
--- Winter: 0.5 inches
--- Spring: -2.4 inches

Situated in northern Texas, Amarillo’s climate is more like cities in nearby Arkansas than the bulk of Texas cities below it. The total yearly snowfall of more than 17 inches in the 1970s, has dropped 10% to about 15.5 inches. It’s not much of a change, and likely is being replaced by rainfall on slightly warmer winter days.

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#37. Jonesboro, Arkansas

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -0.68 inches (-10.88%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 6.25 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 5.57 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 0 inches
--- Winter: -2 inches
--- Spring: 0.8 inches

The tiny annual snowfall in Jonesboro, Arkansas, has gone down nearly 11%, from just over 6 inches to just over 5.5 inches. The city, and Arkansas in general, is a big draw for outdoorsy tourism like fishing and camping, and a fraction of an inch less snow per year isn’t likely to make any difference.

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Dennis Ludlow // Wikimedia Commons

#36. Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -0.89 inches (-13.09%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 6.8 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 5.91 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.3 inches
--- Winter: -0.4 inches
--- Spring: -2.7 inches

North Carolina’s research triangle receives almost no snow, and that tiny number has gone down quite a bit, relatively speaking. In the 1970s, Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina, received just under 7 inches. Today, that number has fallen to just under 6 inches, for a total percentage change of more than 13%.

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#35. Spokane, Washington

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -7.51 inches (-15.04%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 49.92 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 42.41 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -2.7 inches
--- Winter: 0.8 inches
--- Spring: 1.2 inches

Spokane, Washington, is in the far eastern part of the state, about as far from Seattle as you can get. Instead of a wet and mild climate, the eastern part of Washington includes the Selkirk Mountains and the start of the Rocky Mountains, giving it a colder and snowier version, relatively speaking. Spokane’s snowfall has decreased 15%, from nearly 50 inches per year in the 1970s to just over 42 inches.

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#34. Roanoke, Virginia

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -3.08 inches (-15.22%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 20.23 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 17.15 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -4.9 inches
--- Winter: -3.8 inches
--- Spring: -3.9 inches

Roanoke, Virginia, not to be confused with the Roanoke Colony down the coast in North Carolina, has experienced less snowfall from the little bit it received in the 1970s. The amount fell 15% from just over 20 inches to 17 inches. Both Roanoke and the colony share proximity to the Roanoke River, and the city is home to several corporate headquarters and large employers that keep the economy humming.

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#33. Boise, Idaho

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -3.2 inches (-15.57%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 20.55 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 17.35 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1.4 inches
--- Winter: 0.8 inches
--- Spring: -1.5 inches

Idaho’s capital of Boise receives little snow, falling from just under 21 inches annually to just over 17 inches, for a change of 16%. The city of Boise is vibrant with entertainment and culture, but surrounding potato farmers might be worried since potatoes are sensitive to freezing temperatures and swinging temperatures in general, and their growing area is on the move due to climate change.

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Kenneth Zirkel // Wikimedia Commons

#32. Albany, New York

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -11.51 inches (-16.46%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 69.91 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 58.4 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -6 inches
--- Winter: -10.9 inches
--- Spring: -1.9 inches

The capital of New York has a pretty large amount of annual snowfall compared to anywhere but the state’s own Buffalo. Since the 1970s, Albany’s snowfall has dropped about 16.5% from nearly 70 inches to just under 59 inches. It’s likely making up for it with unseasonably warm days and rainfall instead of snow, which can be wild and icy when the temperature dips.

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#31. Milwaukee

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -9.92 inches (-17.6%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 56.35 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 46.43 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1.2 inches
--- Winter: 1.8 inches
--- Spring: -4 inches

Lakefront Milwaukee has experienced a dramatic and surprising nearly 18% drop in snowfall, from over 56 inches per year in the 1970s to just over 46 inches. The largest city in Wisconsin has a diverse economy and population that’s changed considerably since the city’s peak in 1960, and today there’s a broad mix of activities, businesses, and attractions that will keep it going through any reduction in winter fun.

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Bureau of Land Management // Flickr

#30. Casper, Wyoming

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -16.29 inches (-17.79%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 91.57 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 75.28 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -6.8 inches
--- Winter: -0.2 inches
--- Spring: -18.7 inches

Small, mountainous Casper, Wyoming, is the second-largest city in the state with approximately 55,000 residents. The annual snowfall has declined nearly 18%, from almost 92 inches per year to just over 75 inches. Casper has a built-out selection of local historical and outdoor attractions that mean this change in snowfall isn’t likely to make or break the tourism industry, but the climate is so arid otherwise that a loss in precipitation could be a big deal.

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Me*Myself*&*I // Flickr

#29. Dayton, Ohio

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -6.53 inches (-19.44%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 33.59 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 27.06 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1.8 inches
--- Winter: -3 inches
--- Spring: -1.8 inches

Dayton is another of Ohio’s surprisingly large number of thriving medium-sized cities, with a unique footprint of the aerospace industry, research, and a major military base. There’s a medium amount of snowfall but it’s reduced nearly 20%, from just under 34 inches to just over 27 inches. That likely means there are more rainy days during the wintertime, which can cause flooding and icing when the cold returns.

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Anthony Quintano // Wikimedia Commons

#28. Buffalo, New York

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -21.97 inches (-19.8%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 110.98 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 89.01 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -3.9 inches
--- Winter: -1.6 inches
--- Spring: 0.6 inches

For many, Buffalo, New York, has been the unofficial capital of extreme snowfall, mentioned on the news and shown in dramatic photos of entirely covered houses. In fact, it’s because of Buffalo’s extremely high annual snowfall that a nearly 20% decline is so dramatic, meaning the total has fallen from nearly 111 inches per year to 89 inches.

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#27. Tulsa, Oklahoma

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -1.96 inches (-20.37%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 9.62 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 7.66 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.3 inches
--- Winter: -1.9 inches
--- Spring: -1.5 inches

Writer John Paul Brammer was raised in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and has mentioned the appeal of the midsize city’s low housing costs and plentiful public bathrooms. Extremely low snowfall numbers can be added to that list of potential benefits. Tulsa’s snowfall has dropped even further since the 1970s, from nearly 10 inches to 8 inches, representing a decrease of more than 20%. The drying up of precipitation is no joke, though: Oklahoma was the epicenter of the Dust Bowl in the 1930s.

You may also like: Top industries in every state

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Henryk Sadura // Shutterstock

#26. South Bend, Indiana

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -19.93 inches (-21.73%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 91.7 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 71.77 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -4.5 inches
--- Winter: -7.2 inches
--- Spring: -8.8 inches

Mid-size South Bend, Indiana, has been under a microscope for months because of the presidential candidacy of former mayor Pete Buttigieg, but it’s been in the national public imagination for many decades because of the University of Notre Dame. Northern Indiana has very few geographical features, meaning a change of nearly 22%, from 92 inches to 72 inches of snowfall each year, is notable but not life-changing.

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Daniel Schwen // Wikimedia Commons

#25. Champaign, Illinois

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -6.71 inches (-22.69%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 29.57 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 22.86 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -3.5 inches
--- Winter: -5.2 inches
--- Spring: -1.4 inches

Just a few hours south of Chicago, the university town Champaign, Illinois, receives a lot less snow than the Windy City, and has experienced a very similar drop in snowfall of nearly 23%. The drop from almost 30 inches down to about 23 likely makes little day-to-day difference in a spacious, scenic little city with mostly wide, clear roads between it and neighboring Urbana, Illinois.

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Ariztravel // Flickr

#24. Flagstaff, Arizona

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -25.36 inches (-22.95%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 110.49 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 85.13 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -13.1 inches
--- Winter: 3.9 inches
--- Spring: -33.7 inches

Arizona’s climate is largely considered to be hot and dry, and while that’s true for part of the state, Flagstaff, Arizona, has some of the largest annual snowfall numbers of anywhere in the entire United States. Flagstaff is nearly 7,000-feet-above sea level, just 10 minutes from Arizona’s highest mountain, and 75 miles south of Grand Canyon National Park. A reduction in snowfall of nearly 23% might hurt some specific kinds of tourism, but Flagstaff is a year-round magnet for the outdoorsy.

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DVIDSHUB // Flickr

#23. Clarksburg-Weston, West Virginia

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -8.75 inches (-23.03%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 38 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 29.25 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.5 inches
--- Winter: -9.9 inches
--- Spring: 0.2 inches

Clarksburg-Weston, West Virginia, is a tiny paired city whose economy has shifted from manufacturing and coal to technology and criminal justice. This Appalachian enclave has seen a drop of just over 23% in its annual snowfall, from 38 inches down to just over 29 inches. In the big picture, there is concern about climate, of course—but in the small picture, it’s nice to be able to safely get in and out of even the hilliest driveway.

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PxHere

#22. Chicago

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -12.96 inches (-23.3%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 55.62 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 42.66 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 0.7 inches
--- Winter: -3.7 inches
--- Spring: -6.7 inches

Chicago’s famous winter of 1979 was so bad that the newly appointed mayor became a single-termer after residents thought he’d bungled the blizzard response. Now, the city’s snowfall has slowed more than 23% to just under 43 inches annually, which is a 13-inch drop from the 1970s number. Indeed, the winters are warmer, rainier, and with far more extreme temperature swings from day to day.

You may also like: Stacker's local guide to Chicago

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#21. Seattle-Tacoma

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -2.08 inches (-23.8%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 8.74 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 6.66 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -2.1 inches
--- Winter: -0.3 inches
--- Spring: -0.6 inches

While accumulation may be unusual, Seattle’s overall amount of snowfall has gone down nearly 24% from almost 9 inches to 6.5 inches. Indeed, it seems to be making up the difference with rainstorms on unseasonably warm winter days. Forbes’ weather columnist Marshall Shepherd, who holds a doctorate in physical meteorology, explained the ocean and Puget Sound contribute to Seattle’s very mild winters compared with other cities at similar latitudes.

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Collinulness // Wikipedia

#20. Omaha, Nebraska

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -8.54 inches (-25.1%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 34.02 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 25.48 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -4.6 inches
--- Winter: 1.4 inches
--- Spring: -4.4 inches

Temperate and wind-swept Omaha, Nebraska, received more than 34 inches of snow in the 1970s but that has dropped to about 25.5 inches today, meaning a total drop of 25%. Nebraska relies on major agricultural business for its economy, and changes in precipitation, even in the wintertime, represent a trend that worries a state so dedicated to growing corn that members of its university’s sports teams are known as Cornhuskers.

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#19. Denver

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -17.67 inches (-27.18%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 65.01 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 47.34 inches
- Seasonal changes: Data not available

Denver’s location within Colorado means it’s actually an hour-plus drive to many famed ski locales. But the Mile-High City’s annual snowfall reduction by more than 27% is emblematic of what’s happening to the state as a whole, and its residents are organizing to slow the effect climate change has on the state’s snowpack—and its huge snow sports economy.

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#18. Topeka, Kansas

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -7.04 inches (-27.71%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 25.41 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 18.37 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -2.1 inches
--- Winter: -5.1 inches
--- Spring: -3.1 inches

While Kansas is often referred to as a flyover state, its capital city of Topeka has an eventful history, is seeking talented professionals to live there, and is offering incentives to do it. From a climate standpoint, the city receives a medium amount of snow that’s dropped into more of a low zone, going from more than 25 inches annually in the 1970s to just over 18 inches today, for a total percentage change of 28%.

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#17. Charleston, West Virginia

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -11.44 inches (-29.56%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 38.7 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 27.26 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.1 inches
--- Winter: -10.9 inches
--- Spring: -1.2 inches

Charleston, West Virginia, is nestled in the Appalachian Mountains, and the state gets enough cold weather and snow each year to support several ski resorts that cater to travelers from nearby Washington D.C. Losing nearly 30% of its annual snowfall is bad news for these places, but for people in Charleston, it might just mean an easier drive to work every day.

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#16. Reno, Nevada

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -8.56 inches (-30.38%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 28.18 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 19.62 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -2.1 inches
--- Winter: 0.1 inches
--- Spring: -3.4 inches

The idea that Reno, Nevada, receives nearly 20 inches of snow a year, down from more than 28 inches in the 1970s, might seem like a huge surprise—but remember that the city is in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, just miles from Lake Tahoe. Indeed, for the local economies that rely on snowy tourism dollars, the dramatic reduction in snowfall has huge implications.

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Bureau of Land Management Oregon and Washington // Wikimedia Commons

#15. Yakima, Washington

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -7.82 inches (-30.96%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 25.26 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 17.44 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1.5 inches
--- Winter: -5.9 inches
--- Spring: -3.7 inches

Yakima, Washington, is named for the Yakama Nation, a native tribe that now lives on a reservation to the south and west of the city. It’s drier than other parts of the state because of its position relative to nearby mountains, which creates something called a rain shadow. But Yakima’s heavier snowfall is also related to the nearby mountains, and it’s dropped nearly 31%, from 25 inches per year to 17.5 inches today.

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LadyDragonflyCC - >;< // Flickr

#14. Lansing, Michigan

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -20.2 inches (-30.98%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 65.2 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 45 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1.2 inches
--- Winter: -0.1 inches
--- Spring: -12.1 inches

Snowfall in working-class Lansing, Michigan, has dropped from more than 65 inches in the 1970s to 45 inches today, representing a drop of 31%. Central Michigan is an area where almost everyone drives, and more than 40,000 students crowd into East Lansing each year to attend Michigan State University. Less snow means less cold, but with muddy, rainy milder days instead.

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#13. Colorado Springs, Colorado

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -14.58 inches (-31.06%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 46.94 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 32.36 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -6.4 inches
--- Winter: -2.2 inches
--- Spring: -11.9 inches

Any reduction in snow in Colorado has a direct impact on the state’s enormous tourist and winter sports industries. For Colorado Springs, Colorado, the effects could be less, because the city is two hours or more from even the closest ski resort. While the city receives an annual snowfall of 32 inches now compared to the 47 inches it averaged annually in the 1970s, the nearest ski town of Eldora receives an astonishing 118 inches.

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St. Louis Gateway Arch // Shutterstock

#12. St. Louis

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -8.29 inches (-31.56%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 26.27 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 17.98 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1.9 inches
--- Winter: -6.4 inches
--- Spring: -2.5 inches

Snowfall in St. Louis has decreased more than 31% from 26 inches to just under 18 inches. In cities like St. Louis that are middling between cold and warm, the warming and more fluctuating climate likely means more fluke warm days when it can rain instead of snow, and overall warmer winters marked by big swings of colder or warmer temperatures from day to day.

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Daniel Veazey // Flickr

#11. Fayetteville, Arkansas

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -3.93 inches (-32.78%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 11.99 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 8.06 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -3.2 inches
--- Winter: -3.8 inches
--- Spring: -0.9 inches

Although the temperatures in Fayetteville, Arkansas don't dip below freezing often, snow is piling up in this city more now than in the past century. In the winter of 2019-2020, this city was one of the first southern cities to see snow, getting that winter weather before December even began.

Note: this has been updated to reflect Fayetteville, Arkansas, an original version referred to Fayetteville, North Carolina.

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Stashabella // Flickr

#10. Wichita Falls, Texas

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -2.06 inches (-33.07%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 6.23 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 4.17 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.7 inches
--- Winter: -3 inches
--- Spring: 0.1 inches

Wichita Falls, Texas, is very near a large and economy-boosting military base, with a dry and warm climate ideal for the constant stream of air traffic from the Air Force trainees. Even so, the already low average snowfall has decreased from 6 inches to just over 4 inches, meaning a change of more than 33%.

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#9. Abilene-Sweetwater, Texas

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -1.99 inches (-34.13%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 5.83 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 3.84 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 0.3 inches
--- Winter: -2.5 inches
--- Spring: -1.1 inches

Abilene, Texas, is a city that’s thriving partly because of an associated Air Force base that is the city’s largest employer. Texas band and one-hit wonder Fastball has a song named after neighboring Sweetwater, Texas, located just 41 miles west of Abilene. The area receives just under 4 inches of annual snowfall today, down from 6 inches in the 1970s, for a drop of more than 34%.

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#8. Columbia, Missouri

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -10.35 inches (-35.07%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 29.51 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 19.16 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -3.8 inches
--- Winter: -8.3 inches
--- Spring: -3.9 inches

Columbia, Missouri, is home to the University of Missouri and has a climate that changes drastically with the seasons, from very hot summers to frigid winters. The local annual snowfall has dropped more than 35%, from 30 inches to 19 inches. This type of climate means more rain during the winter on days that used to be cold enough for snow.

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James Willamor // Flickr

#7. Charlotte, North Carolina

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -2.77 inches (-38.53%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 7.19 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 4.42 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 0 inches
--- Winter: -1.5 inches
--- Spring: -2.2 inches

The Charlotte Hornets has been majority owned by basketball legend Michael Jordan since 2010. The city is the largest in North Carolina and the 16th largest in the United States. Charlotte is warm and has very little snow—a number that started low and has only gotten lower. Beginning at 7 inches, the annual snowfall has decreased almost 39% to 4.5 inches per year.

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#6. Jackson, Tennessee

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -2.91 inches (-39.54%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 7.36 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 4.45 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 0.1 inches
--- Winter: -2 inches
--- Spring: -0.3 inches

Jackson, Tennessee, is a small city with a superstar-grade fiber-optic network, a handful of local colleges and universities, and the Rockabilly Hall of Fame. Jackson’s annual snowfall of just over 7 inches in the 1970s has fallen to 4.5 inches today, for a total drop of almost 40%.

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Michele Walls // Shutterstock

#5. Lubbock, Texas

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -4.76 inches (-41.57%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 11.45 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 6.69 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -3.6 inches
--- Winter: -3.8 inches
--- Spring: -1.5 inches

In the far north of Texas, Lubbock has that same slightly more temperate Oklahoma weather and a low annual snowfall as a result. The annual snow has dropped precipitously, from 11.5 inches in the 1970s to just under 7 inches, a decrease of nearly 42%.

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#4. Evansville, Indiana

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -8.13 inches (-41.99%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 19.36 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 11.23 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.9 inches
--- Winter: -4.2 inches
--- Spring: -4.2 inches

Evansville, Indiana, is a small city with very little snow relative to the rest of the surrounding Midwest. That number has fallen dramatically, however, from just under 20 inches in the 1970s to 11 inches today. The total decrease of annual average snowfall for the city is 42%, one of the largest declines on the list.

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M.Bucka // Wikimedia Commons

#3. Albuquerque-Santa Fe, New Mexico

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -6.93 inches (-50.29%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 13.78 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 6.85 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -0.3 inches
--- Winter: -3.3 inches
--- Spring: -4 inches

Much of New Mexico is covered by mountains and temperate forests. The reduction of annual snowfall by more than 50%—from nearly 14 inches of snow to just under 7 inches—could hit these landscapes hard, especially when the rest of the state is so dry. This could be a related phenomenon to the rise in drought conditions in the west, too.

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Dicklyon // Wikimedia Commons

#2. El Paso, Texas

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -2.97 inches (-51.83%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 5.73 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 2.76 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: -1 inches
--- Winter: -4.1 inches
--- Spring: -2.8 inches

In El Paso, Texas, winter has almost dried up completely for its residents— from nearly 6 inches of annual snow to just under 3 inches. This means rare snow days are even rarer, representing the same shift that’s dragging the climate up and increasing extreme weather around the world. The gentle snowfall will likely be replaced with more common local storms and tornadoes.

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Nathan Anderson // Wikimedia Commons

#1. Knoxville, Tennessee

- Annual average change in snowfall, 1970s–2010s: -6.78 inches (-52.07%)
- Annual average snowfall, 1970–1979: 13.02 inches
- Annual average snowfall, 2010–2019: 6.24 inches
- Seasonal changes:
--- Fall: 0.3 inches
--- Winter: -8.6 inches
--- Spring: -3.5 inches

Knoxville, Tennessee, has the dubious distinction of having the most dramatic reduction in snowfall on the ACIS list, with a drop of more than 52%, from 13 inches in the 1970s to 6 inches annually today. Day to day, having less snow might seem nice and certainly be convenient, but it represents a gradual decline in regional climate that will have a ripple effect on what grows and what survives.

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