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50 animals whose homes are threatened by climate change

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David Havel // Shutterstock

50 animals whose homes are threatened by climate change

As more people around the world face the immediate consequences of climate change in real-time, scientists continue to study and update the far-ranging impacts of a heating world not only on humans but also on thousands of other species in the days to come. The overwhelming majority of climate scientists agree that a warming climate threatens and is already impacting global biodiversity and support a push for real aid and legal protection for all species in peril.

A 2019 study published in February 2020 by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, one of the world’s most respected scientific journals, does just that. The researchers link data on species distributions around the world with carbon emissions scenarios.

The authors of the new research, Cristian Román-Palacios and John J. Wiens used data from past surveys of these 538 species to predict how climate change would impact the ranges of these species. They calculated how temperatures would change in each species’ native habitat under several emissions scenarios, then determined whether each species’ population would survive in its current state, be forced to change habitat and disperse, or go extinct.

In the case of extinction, the species is projected to disappear completely. In cases of dispersal, some species may survive by changing their habitats and moving to more favorable conditions and/or shifting their behaviors to navigate changes to their habitat.

In this story, Stacker highlights 50 animal species examined in this study, all of which will either face extinction or dispersal in the next 50 years under the moderate emissions scenario RCP 4.5, as calculated using the climate model HadGM2. Many of the species included in this story are from the same regions (for example, moths of Madagascar, and birds of South America), as data for these species come from the same source survey papers. You’ll also notice that in some regions, other human impacts besides climate are already affecting some species.

The study serves as a canary in a coal mine, with its remarkable and powerful new research providing a window into a possible future that is distinctly quieter than the world we live in today. There is still time to change some of these numbers and projections—and an increasing number of scientists, politicians, corporations, and everyday people is working to do just that.

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David Havel // Shutterstock

Speckled hummingbird

- Scientific name: Adelomyia melanogenys
- Geographic region: South America
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The speckled hummingbird lives only in a very narrow strip of forested areas of the Andes along the western coast of South America, from approximately Venezuela in the north to Bolivia in the south. Its “speckles” can be hard to see, but its black cheek patch with white stripe behind its eye makes it easier to identify. It lives in wet, humid forests and builds nests that hang from beneath fern leaves.

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Ondrej Prosicky // Shutterstock

Long-tailed sylph

- Scientific name: Aglaiocercus kingi
- Geographic region: South America
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The long-tailed sylph is a striking hummingbird found only the mountains of the Andes in South America, also in a very narrow strip on the western part of the continent, from approximately Venezuela to Bolivia. The male’s exceptionally long tail, short beak, and glittering green crown and throat help distinguish it from the violet-tailed sylph, found in parts of the same range. Females are less colorful and have much shorter tails. Long-tailed sylphs look for food throughout all elevations in the mountain forests and build nests of moss that hang like balls from the branches above.

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Ihor Hvozdetskyi // Shutterstock

Dor beetle

- Scientific name: Anoplotrupes stercorosus
- Geographic region: Europe
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The dor beetle is an earth-boring dung beetle found throughout Europe. The beetles live in broadleaf forests such as beech forests and humid, mixed-species forests, as well as evergreen forests. Adult beetles are a metallic bluish-black and are 12-20 millimeters, which is small relative to other common dung beetles. Dor beetles feed on animal feces, fungi, and tree sap; and they burrow into the earth to lay their eggs at the end of a small tunnel where they store feces to feed the larvae which will hatch from the eggs. Adults are active in summer, lay their eggs in fall to overwinter, then the pupae emerge in spring.

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Katja Schulz // iNaturalist

Ant (A. picea)

- Scientific name: Aphaenogaster picea
- Geographic region: North America
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

Aphaenogaster picea, also known as pitch-black collared ants, are found in higher elevation mountain or rocky areas of eastern North America. Workers have wider heads and distinct habitats compared to related species. These ants nest in rotting wood, in soil, and beneath bark. The genus Aphaenogaster is common in North America but in the PNAS study, A. picea, at least, is projected to go extinct in these habitats under a moderate emissions scenario.

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Elkin Restrepo // Shutterstock

Chestnut-tipped toucanet

- Scientific name: Aulacorhynchus derbianus
- Geographic region: South America
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The chestnut-tipped toucanet lives in a very narrow band of lower mountainous forests in the Andes and Guianan highlands, along a portion of western South America. It is green with a black bill and a red tail tip. Its call is similar but distinctive from other toucanets, with longer and softer notes. The chestnut-tipped toucanet feeds on fruits in the forest canopy, and is typically on its own or in pairs, and occasionally in small groups. So far, no nests have been observed so nesting behavior remains unknown.

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A.G.A // Shutterstock

Common carder-bee

- Scientific name: Bombus pascuorum
- Geographic region: Europe
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The common carder-bee is found across much of Europe with higher numbers in the United Kingdom. It’s a brown bumblebee, and two other species in its genus, Bombus, are in steep decline. It is hard to identify a carder-bee from the other Bombus species, unless the black patches on the side of its body are well developed. Carder-bees are common in gardens and in many other habitats. They make nests in grasslands, leaf litter, and beneath hedges, always above ground. Carder bees build their nests by gathering—or “carding”—materials, including moss and dry grass, to cover their nests. Nests are small for bumblebees and have fewer workers than other bumblebee species.

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Unknown // GBIF

Bumblebee (B. sichelii)

- Scientific name: Bombus sichelii
- Geographic region: Europe
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

Bumblebees of the species Bombus sichelli are uncommon and found only in a few parts of Europe. They are identified by their distinctive white-band.

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Jonathan Hicks // Shutterstock

Knapweed carder-bee

- Scientific name: Bombus sylvarum
- Geographic region: Europe
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The knapweed, or shrill, carder-bee is among the rarest bumblebees in the United Kingdom, though it can also be found across parts of Europe. It is a distinctive bumblebee with pale-grey yellowish coloring and a reddish-orange tail. It prefers particular types of flowers for their pollen and nectar. These bees build nests on or just beneath the ground in thick grass. The hives typically have a small number of workers relative to other species of bumblebees.

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blobhm // iNaturalist

Moth (C. subexpressa)

- Scientific name: Calletaera subexpressa
- Geographic region: Asia
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

Moths of the species Calletaera subespressa are found only in certain parts of Southeast Asia. These moths are small with a grey band on both wings. They are rare, and are mostly found in the lower elevation mountain forests, but may occasionally be seen at higher elevations.

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David Erterius // iNaturalist

Chameleon (C. guillaumeti)

- Scientific name: Calumma cf. guillaumeti
- Geographic region: Madagascar
- Status under RCP 4.5: Range shift and dispersal

The chameleon Calumma guillaumeti is found only in a small area in Madagascar. Besides climate change, it is vulnerable to logging and agricultural practices.

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T-I // Shutterstock

Chameleon (C. malthe)

- Scientific name: Calumma malthe
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Geographic region: Madagascar
- Status under RCP 4.5: Range shift and dispersal

The green-eared chameleon, Calumma malthe, is only found in a few isolated pockets on the island of Madagascar. Like the C. guillaumeti chameleon, C. malthe is vulnerable to logging and agricultural practices.

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David Erterius // iNaturalist

Chameleon (C. peltierorum)

- Scientific name: Calumma peltierorum
- Geographic region: Madagascar
- Status under RCP 4.5: Range shift and dispersal

The chameleon Calumma peltierorum is listed as near-threatened by the IUCN Red List. It is found only in Madagascar and, like the other chameleons there, is vulnerable to logging and agricultural practices.

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Ana Agred // Wikimedia Commons

Spotted nightingale-thrush

- Scientific name: Catharus dryas
- Geographic region: South America
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

Considered to be one of the showiest of the Catharusthrush species, Catharus dryas lives in humid and dense foothill slopes, including in the Andes mountains of South America. Its range stretches north from Mexico southward to Honduras, along the western Andean range. It is common where it lives, but so secretive that you’re more likely to hear it than see it. You can listen to its song at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Its plumage is striking and the bird has a black head with a red ring around its eye, while its bill is bright orange-red.

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Cephas // Wikimedia Commons

Brown-headed bush-tanager

- Scientific name: Chlorospingus ophtalmicus
- Geographic region: South America
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The brown-headed bush-tanager, Chlorospingus ophtalmicus, is very common with a large range from central Mexico, through South America to its southernmost habitat in Argentina. It is found in cloud forests of the upper mountainous elevations and tends to live in small flocks that forage in the forest’s undergrowth. You can listen to its call at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

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Unknown // GBIF

Moth (C. pseudobolima)

- Scientific name: Chorodna pseudobolima
- Geographic region: Asia
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

Moths of the species Chorodna pseudobolima are found throughout Southeast Asia, Borneo, and into Australia. These moths are found in mountainous lowlands and in some higher elevations.

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David Havel // Shutterstock

Bronzy Inca

- Scientific name: Coeligena coeligena
- Geographic region: South America
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The bronzy Inca, Coeligena coeligena, is an unusual hummingbird found in the humid forests of the Andes mountains in South America, from Venezuela in the north to Bolivia in the south. The bronzy Inca is remarkably dull in plumage compared to most of the other species in its genus. Some scientists who study evolution wonder what caused these particular hummingbirds to evolve a more drab set of feathers compared to their closest relatives. You can listen to the bronzy Inca’s call at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

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Cosmin Manci // Shutterstock

C. erraticus

- Scientific name: Colobopterus erraticus
- Geographic region: Europe
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The beetle Colobopterus erraticus is found throughout Europe and parts of North America. Beetles and ladybugs make up the order Coleoptera, which, with around 350,000 species, has the largest number of species of living beings on Earth.

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ELDIE AARON JUSTIM // Shutterstock

Moth (C.orestias)

- Scientific name: Comostola orestias
- Geographic region: Asia
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

This large green moth is the biggest species of butterfly in Borneo. It is not common, and lives in lowlands to mid-elevation mountain regions. The Comostola orestias is sporadically found in Borneo, the Malaysian peninsula, and Sumatra, New Guinea.

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Félix Uribe // Flickr

Bluish flower-piercer

- Scientific name: Diglossa caerulescens
- Geographic region: South America
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The bluish flower-piercer, Diglossa caerulescens, lives in the mountainous Andean forests of western South America, from Venezuela in the north to Bolivia in the south. Flower-piercers literally use their beaks like little swords, puncturing flowers to reach their nectar. They will also eat insects and small fruits. The bluish flower-piercer is often found in mixed flocks with another related bird, the masked flower-piercer. The masked has much more showy plumage than the bluish, which helps scientists tell them apart. You can listen to the Bluish flower-piercer at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

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Chrystopher Canaday // Wikimedia Commons

Deep-blue flower-piercer

- Scientific name: Diglossa glauca
- Geographic region: South America
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The deep-blue flower-piercer, Diglossa glauca, is found in the mountainous Andean forests of South America in pockets from Colombia to Bolivia. This species is typically only found alone or in pairs on eastern slopes below 8,200 feet and occasionally in mixed flocks. Like other flower-piercers, it uses its beak to pierce flowers than feeds on the flower’s nectar. This is the only flower-piercer with striking, yellow eyes. You can listen to the deep-blue flower-piercer at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

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SIMON SHIM // Shutterstock

Moth (D. alaopis)

- Scientific name: Dindica alaopis
- Geographic region: Asia
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

This yellowish moth is found only in Borneo. It lives in mid-elevation mountain forests from about 2,900 to 8,500 feet.

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yakovlev.alexey // Wikimedia Commons

Moth (D. plana)

- Scientific name: Dooabia plana
- Geographic region: Asia
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The moth, Dooabia plana, is found only in Borneo. It is one of a number of Dooabia species found there, and lives in the upper mountainous forests.

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Agami Photo Agency // Shutterstock

Green-fronted lancebill

- Scientific name: Doryfera ludovicae
- Geographic region: South America
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The green-fronted lancebill, Doryfera ludovicae, lives in the cloud forests of Costa Rica and Panama as well as along the western edge of South America in the Andes from Venezuela south to Bolivia. It sports a remarkably long bill, one nearly as long as its own body, which it uses to reach the nectar inside long, tubular flowers. Green-fronted lancebills return again and again to favorite flowers. These remarkable birds build dangling nests of moss and ferns under roots and ledges along streams.

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Matthew Moskwik // iNaturalist

East Betsileo Madagascar frog

- Scientific name: Gephyromantis asper
- Geographic region: Madagascar
- Status under RCP 4.5: Range shift and dispersal

The east Betsileo Madagascar frog is found only in Madagascar. These frogs usually live close to streams in the rainforest. Although the frogs are now fairly common in Madagascar rainforests, those forests are in decline as a result of agriculture, logging, and the introduction of invasive species.

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Christine Reinhardt // MNHN - Museum national d'Histoire naturelle

Tandroka Madagascar frog

- Scientific name: Gephyromantis tandroka
- Geographic region: Madagascar
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

Tandroka Madagascar frog, Gephyromantis tandroka, lives in Madagascar and has only been found in five locations. It lives in mid-elevation rainforest and is found near small streams or other rivulets of water. The IUCN lists the Tandroka frog as vulnerable because it is isolated, fairly uncommon, and at risk of human activities like logging, agriculture, development, and introduced species as well as declining rainforest area.

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Bernard DUPONT // Wikimedia Commons

Tree frog (G. liber)

- Scientific name: Guibemantis liber
- Geographic region: Madagascar
- Status under RCP 4.5: Range shift and dispersal

The tree frog Guibemantis liber is found only in Madagascar. It is arboreal, meaning it lives the trees. Its color varies, and the frogs are active at night. Males make calls to females on wet, rainy nights. These frogs make egg sacs that hang above water. Tadpoles fall into the water after developing in the egg sac hanging above.

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Allan Hopkins // iNaturalist

Guibemantis A

- Scientific name: Guibemantis sp. A
- Geographic region: Madagascar
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

Guibemantis is a frog genus containing 16 species, all of which are found only in Madagascar. This group of frog species depends on the ecosystems and rainforests found only in Madagascar, many of which are threatened by human development, agriculture, logging, and introduced species. At least one new species in this genus was just discovered and described as recently as 2015.

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Alejandro Bayer Tamayo // Wikimedia Commons

Greenish puffleg

- Scientific name: Haplophaedia aureliae
- Geographic region: South America
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

Greenish pufflegs, Haplophaedia aureliae, are found in a few corridors along the Andean rainforest, on the northwestern side of South America. Pufflegs are identified by their puffy leg feathers, though Greenish pufflegs are not as puffy as some other pufflegs. These birds forage on the nectar in small clusters of flowers, typically in the understory. They will sometimes visit the canopy to feed on certain tree blossoms. Greenish pufflegs will defend their flowers but they are less territorial than other puffleg species.

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Paolo Costa // Shutterstock

Violet-fronted brilliant

- Scientific name: Heliodoxa leadbeateri
- Geographic region: South America
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The violet-fronted brilliant hummingbird, Heliodoxa leadbeateri, lives in the cloud forests of the Andes in South America, from Venezuela in the north to Bolivia in the south. A fairly large hummingbird, males and females are dark green with only the male sporting a violet crown. Very little is known about this species’ breeding behavior.

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Paul Fenwick // iNaturalist

Yellow-throated tanager

- Scientific name: Iridisornis analis
- Geographic region: South America
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

Yellow-throated tanagers, Iridisornis analis, live on the eastern slopes of the Andes along the western coast of South America from Columbia to Peru. They are typically found in the dense understory of the mountain rainforest. The genus name Iridisornis, comes from combining the Latin words Iris (rainbow) and ornis (birds). These “rainbow birds” are colorful and can be mistaken for other species in this genius that are likewise very colorful, with subtle differences in shading and markings that help scientists tell them apart.

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Ryan M. Bolton // Shutterstock

Tree frog (M. opiparis)

- Scientific name: Mantidactylus cf. opiparis
- Geographic region: Madagascar
- Status under RCP 4.5: Range shift and dispersal

The tree frog Mantidactylus cf. opiparis is found only in the rainforest of Madagascar, though it is common there. These tree frogs live near rainforest streams and males typically call during the day from very concealed locations. Even though this particular species is fairly common, the Madagascar rainforests are under threat by human impacts like shrinking forest habitat, logging, development, introduced species, and agriculture.

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Bernard DUPONT // Wikimedia Commons

Frog (M. femoralis)

- Scientific name: Mantidactylus femoralis
- Geographic region: Madagascar
- Status under RCP 4.5: Range shift and dispersal

The frog Mantidactylus femoralis is very common across Madagascar and is found in a range of rainforests and similar habitats. It ranges from sea level to elevations as high as 8,200 feet. It’s usually found near water or streams and is quite common—although little is known about its calls.

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David Havel // Shutterstock

Pale-edge flycatcher

- Scientific name: Myiarchus cephalotes
- Geographic region: South America
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The pale-edge flycatcher, Myiarchus cephalotes, lives in the mountainous Andes rainforests on the western side of South America. It is one of the flycatcher species that is found only in the humid rainforest, and in no other types of habitat.

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KU // GBIF

Golden-browed chat-tyrant

- Scientific name: Ochthoecha pulchella
- Geographic region: South America
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The golden-browed chat-tyrant, Ochthoecha pulchella, is a small species of flycatcher that lives in the Andes of western South America. It ranges from forest edges to shrubby clearings at higher elevations from 6,500 to 9,200 feet. These birds typically forage alone or in pairs, do not have striking plumage, and tend to stay hidden in brushy vegetation along the ground while foraging.

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budak // iNaturalist

Moth (O. similaria)

- Scientific name: Orthocabera similaria
- Geographic region: Asia
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

Moths of the species Orthocabera similariaare found only in Java, Borneo, and Sumatra. These moths are typically found in upper elevation mountainous forests.

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Arnold Wijker // iNaturalist

Moth (P. posterecta)

- Scientific name: Paramaxates posterecta
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Geographic region: Asia
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The moths known as Paramaxates posterecta are found only in Taiwan, Himalaya, Java, Borneo, and Sumatra. The species is typically found in upper elevation mountainous forests.

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Brandon Shaw // iNaturalist

Lined day gecko

- Scientific name: Phelsuma lineata puctualata
- Geographic region: Madagascar
- Status under RCP 4.5: Range shift and dispersal

The lined day gecko, Phelsuma lineata puctualata, is common in its Madagascar habitat. There are a number of variants of lined day geckos, and it is possible they are separate species.

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Ben Tavener // Flickr

Mottle-cheeked tyrannulet

- Scientific name: Phylloscartes ventralis
- Geographic region: South America
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The mottle-cheeked tyrannulet, Phylloscartes ventralis, is wide-ranging across South America. They are found in a long stretch of the Andes mountain forest on the west side of the continent, from Brazil south to Argentina. They’re also found throughout the Atlantic forest area on the eastern side of South America which includes parts of Uruguay and eastern Paraguay. These birds typically forage with many other species of birds in mixed flocks. Mottle-cheeked tyrannulets primarily prey on insects and other invertebrates.

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Matee Nuserm // Shutterstock

Moth (P. ruginaria)

- Scientific name: Pingasa ruginaria
- Geographic region: Asia
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

Moths of the species Pingasa ruginariaare found in northern India, Southeast Asia, the Ryukyu Islands, and Sundaland. They are usually found in lowland forests throughout these areas, but sometimes live at higher, mountainous elevations. The species is found in both old-growth and secondary forests.

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Christopher Becerra // Shutterstock

Green-and-black fruiteater

- Scientific name: Pipreola riefferii
- Geographic region: South America
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The green-and-black fruiteater, Pipreola riefferii, is a fruit-eating bird found in a variety of forest types across the Andes mountain range in South America. Their range extends north from Venezuela and south to Peru, and they are usually found in mid- to higher-elevation forests. Their plumage is a vibrant green; males have black heads while females’ heads are green. The green-and-black fruiteater is a cotinga, a large family of fruit-eating birds.

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budak // iNaturalist

Tree frog (P. pollicaris)

- Scientific name: Platypelis pollicaris
- Geographic region: Madagascar
- Status under RCP 4.5: Range shift and dispersal

The tree frog Platypelis pollicaris is found in Madagascar. It is arboreal, meaning it spends its life in trees. This species of tree frog lives in a tree known as the screw pine, as well as inside bamboo stems. The Madagascar forests where these tree frogs live are under threat by human impacts such as shrinking forest habitat, logging, development, introduced species, and agriculture.

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sullivanribbit // iNaturalist

Tree frog (P. guntherpetersi)

- Scientific name: Plethodontohyla guntherpetersi
- Geographic region: Madagascar
- Status under RCP 4.5: Range shift and dispersal

Tree frogs of the species Plethodontohyla guntherpetersi are microhylids, or “narrow-mouthed” frogs, found only in Madagascar. The forests where these tree frogs live are under threat by human impacts like shrinking forest habitat, logging, development, introduced species, and agriculture.

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Nomdeploom // Wikimedia Commons

Spotted barbtail

- Scientific name: Premnoplex brunnescens
- Geographic region: South America
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The spotted barbtail, Premnoplex brunnescens, is a species that scientists still know little about. It is found in the humid mountainous rainforests of the Andes along the western edge of South America, up into Central America. They range from Venezuela and Costa Rica in the north to Bolivia in the south. These birds are very small and inconspicuous, foraging for insects by creeping quietly through undergrowth such as mosses, bark crevices, leaf litter, and along branches. The spotted barbtail sometimes uses its tail for balance, or hangs upside down while searching for bugs. You can listen to the spotted barbtail's song at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

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Dr. Alexey Yakovlev // Flickr

Moth (S. reductatus)

- Scientific name: Sarcinodes reductatus
- Geographic region: Asia
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The moth Sarcinodes reductatus is found in parts of eastern Asia including Borneo and Java. It is large with pink to mauve to brownish coloring, and is usually found in mid- to higher-elevation mountainous forests.

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Cláudio Dias Timm // Wikimedia Commons

Buff-browed foliage-gleaner

- Scientific name: Syndactyla rufosuperciliata
- Geographic region: South America
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

Buff-browed foliage-gleaner, Syndactyla rufosuperciliata, has two distinct ranges in South America. One range is along the west coast, where the birds are found in the humid mountain forests of the Andes; the other is a wide-ranging area of the Atlantic forested lowlands on the eastern side of the continent. This bird has a distinctive buff-colored brow stripe above its eye and forages in the dense, shrubby understory and among vines.

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GBIF

Moth (S. obscura)

- Scientific name: Synegia obscura
- Geographic region: Asia
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The moth Synegia obscura is found in areas of Asia including India, Borneo, the far east and other parts of southeast Asia. It is found in upper elevation mountainous forests.

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Matee Nuserm // Shutterstock

Moth (T. rafflesii)

- Scientific name: Tanaorhinus rafflesii
- Geographic region: Asia
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

The moth Tanaorhinus rafflesiiis found in areas of Southeast Asia including Burma and Sudanland. It is a large, striking green moth that is found in lowland forested areas, although it has also been found in higher elevations.

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Francesco Veronesi // Wikimedia Commons

Blue-and-black tanager

- Scientific name: Tangara vassorii
- Geographic region: South America
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

Blue-and-black tanager, Tangara vassorii, is a common bird species found throughout the western side of South America in the Andes mountains. The birds’ range extends from Venezuela south to Bolivia. Blue-and-black tanagers live at higher elevations than other tanager species and forage for fruit and insects in pairs or mixed flocks. They have striking, iridescent blue plumage.

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AfroBrazilian // Wikimedia Commons

Spring dor beetle

- Scientific name: Trypcopris vernalis
- Geographic region: Europe
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

Spring dor beetles, Trypcopris vernalis, are found throughout the United Kingdom, Europe, and into Asia. They are a common dung beetle and can range from a metallic blue-black to purple in color. Dung beetles feed on animal feces, and spring dor beetles tend to prefer sheep or fox dung.

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Paul Fenwick // iNaturalist

Olive-backed woodcreeper

- Scientific name: Xiphorhynchus triangularis
- Geographic region: South America
- Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

Olive-backed woodcreepers, Xiphorhynchus triangularis, are songbirds that live in the higher elevation forests of the Andes mountains on the northwestern edge of South America from Venezuela in the north to Bolivia in the south. It is the only songbird in its genus that lives exclusively in higher-elevation forests. Olive-backed woodcreepers forage on tree trunks and limbs, creeping and hopping quietly along as woodcreepers are known to do. These birds are hard to spot with their dull brown and olive plumage. You can listen to the Olive-backed woodcreeper at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

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