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Most Oscar-nominated movies of all time

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Summit Entertainment

Most Oscar-nominated movies of all time

Since the first Academy Award ceremony in 1929, only 29 films have received 12 nominations or more—it’s not an easy feat. An additional 23 films have received 11 nominations. Stacker looked at the Oscars awards database to compile this list of films with 11 nominations or more—the latest nominations were announced on Jan. 13, 2020. The number of categories a motion picture is eligible to be nominated for has changed throughout the years, with the current number set at 17 possible categories. The films in a three-way tie with the highest number of nominations, 14, are “All About Eve” (16 possible categories), “Titanic,” and “La La Land” (each with 17 possible). “Titanic” also holds a three-way tie for most Oscar wins, 11, shared with “Ben-Hur” and “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King.”

Throughout the years, the coveted Best Picture award has had a number of different titles. The award was called Outstanding Picture, Outstanding Production, and then Outstanding Motion Picture through the 16th Academy Awards in 1944. The title switched to Best Motion Picture in 1962; since then, the top honor has been known as Best Picture.

While all of the top nominated films have secured nods in the most elite category, Best Picture, more than a third don’t win that prize even with 12 nominations or more, and with 11 nominations, around half lose out. Nominations don’t guarantee wins. Two films with 12 nominations garnered only one Oscar, and two films with 11 nominations went home empty-handed, completely shut out.

The number of different categories and types of awards across the over 90 years of ceremonies reflect the technical and cultural changes in the film industry. Awards for achievements in sound changed in scope and number as the film industry shifted from the silent era to talkies with consistent technological advancements along the way. The Academy also divided awards in categories like Cinematography, Art Direction, and Costume Design into two segments, Color and Black-and-White, as the industry transferred dominance from one medium to the next between the late 1930s and late 1960s. “The Apartment,” in 1961, was the last black-and-white film to win Best Picture, until “Schindler’s List” (with partial colorization) in 1994, and subsequently, “The Artist” in 2012.

Read on to discover the most Oscar-nominated movies of all time.

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Warner Bros.

#51. Joker (2019)

- Nominations: 11
- Wins: currently nominated 
- Best picture: currently nominated 
- Oscars Ceremony: 96th

Writer-director Todd Phillips (of “Old School” and “The Hangover” series fame) and Joaquin Phoenix sent the nation into a frenzy of controversy this Fall when “Joker” hit theaters. Its dark and vile R-rated tone marked a major turn in comic book movie culture. Unlike previous iterations of Gotham’s infamous Joker, this one has a devastating origin story as well as a name: Arthur Fleck (Phoenix). The film has been widely accused of casting a sympathetic lens on a violent, self-pitying man, but not as much as it’s been accused of copying early Scorsese-De Niro films, most prominently “Taxi Driver” and “The King of Comedy.” Neither claim has curbed the movie's success; if anything, the perceived scandals seem to have boosted it. “Joker” shocked audiences and critics alike when it took home the Golden Lion at the Venice International Film Festival, became the highest-grossing October release of all-time, and collected more Oscar nominations than any other film in 2019.

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Hera Productions

#50. The Turning Point (1977) (tie)

- Nominations: 11
- Wins: 0
- Best picture: nominated
- Oscars Ceremony: 50th

“The Turning Point” tied with “Julia” with 11 nominations but didn’t win any. Notably, “Star Wars” scored 10 nominations, and won six the same year. The romantic comedy “Annie Hall” was the surprise Best Picture Winner. “The Turning Point,” a drama set in the world of ballet, was nominated twice in the Best Actress category (Anne Bancroft and Shirley MacLaine). Leslie Browne was nominated for Supporting Actress, and professional dancer star Mikhail Baryshnikov for Supporting Actor. The film also had nominations for Best Picture, Director, Art Direction, Cinematography, Sound, Editing, and Writing (Original Screenplay).

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Amblin Entertainment

#50. The Color Purple (1985) (tie)

- Nominations: 11
- Wins: 0
- Best picture: nominated
- Oscars Ceremony: 58th

“The Color Purple” is one of two films with a record 11 nominations (including Best Picture) that received zero Oscars at the Academy Awards. The film tied with “Out of Africa” in number of nominations, but that film won seven Oscars—the most that night, including Best Picture and Director wins. Notably, director Steven Spielberg was not nominated for directing “The Color Purple.” Akira Kurosawa for “Ran” took his slot, one that usually goes to the director of Best Picture nominees. Whoopi Goldberg was nominated for Best Actress and Oprah Winfrey and Margaret Avery for Supporting Actress. The film also received nominations for Art Direction, Cinematography, Costume Design, Makeup, Original Song, Musical Score, and Writing (Adapted Screenplay)—it was based on Alice Walker’s best-selling novel which has subsequently also been adapted into a hit Broadway musical.

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The Samuel Goldwyn Company

#47. The Pride of the Yankees (1942) (tie)

- Nominations: 11
- Wins: 1
- Best picture: nominated
- Oscars Ceremony: 15th

This popular sports biopic of Lou Gehrig was no match for the similarly sentimental “Mrs. Miniver” which scored 12 nominations and six wins. “The Pride of the Yankees” won just a single award for Editing. It was also nominated for Best Picture (then called Outstanding Motion Picture, Cinematography Black-and-White), Art Direction (Black-and-White), Musical Score, Sound, Special Effects, and Writing for both Screenplay and Story. Gary Cooper and Teresa Wright were also nominated in the lead acting categories.

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Columbia Pictures

#47. Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939) (tie)

- Nominations: 11
- Wins: 1
- Best picture: nominated
- Oscars Ceremony: 12th

1939 was a banner year for American cinema. “Gone With the Wind” had a whopping 13 nominations, with classics “Stagecoach” and “The Wizard of Oz” also nominated this year. “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington,” perhaps because it depicted government corruption and was released during the outbreak of World War II, only received one award, despite its box office popularity. It received a Writing Oscar for the story category. It was also nominated for Writing in the screenplay category (these awards were separated at the time) as well as, Sound, Musical Score, Editing, and Art Production. It received nominations for Best Picture (Outstanding Production, at the time), Directing (Frank Capra), Actor (James Stewart), and Supporting Actor (Harry Carey).

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Paramount Pictures

#47. Chinatown (1974) (tie)

- Nominations: 11
- Wins: 1
- Best picture: nominated
- Oscars Ceremony: 47th

“Chinatown” tied with “The Godfather Part II” with 11 nominations each. Roman Polanski’s neo-noir crime story featured a disturbing finale which may account for its single Oscar win—for Writing (Original Screenplay). It was also nominated for Best Picture, Director, Editing, Sound, Art Direction, Costume Design, Musical Score, and Cinematography. Both Faye Dunaway and Jack Nicholson were nominated in the lead acting category

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Warner Bros.

#44. Sergeant York (1941) (tie)

- Nominations: 11
- Wins: 2
- Best picture: nominated
- Oscars Ceremony: 14th

“Sergeant York” was up against “Citizen Kane” (widely regarded as the Best Film of all time), but the Best Picture (at the time Outstanding Motion Picture) went to the family drama “How Green Was My Valley.” “Citizen Kane” won a single award for Writing (Original Screenplay) while “Sergeant York” just two for Best Actor (Gary Cooper) and Editing. It was also nominated for Best Picture, Directing, Cinematography (Black-and-White), Art Direction (Black-and-White), Musical Score, Sound, Writing (Original Screenplay), and twice in Supporting acting categories.

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Selznick International Pictures

#44. Rebecca (1940) (tie)

- Nominations: 11
- Wins: 2
- Best picture: nominated
- Oscars Ceremony: 13th

“Rebecca” is rare in that it won Best Picture (then Outstanding Production) along with only one other award in Cinematography (Black-and-White). Alfred Hitchcock received the first of five nominations for Best Director; though he’d never secure a win. “Rebecca” also had three acting nominations for Joan Fontaine and Laurence Olivier in the Leads, and Judith Anderson as Supporting Actress. It was also nominated for Musical Score, Editing, Art Direction (Black-and-White), Special Effects, and Writing.

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Home Box Office (HBO)

#44. A Passage to India (1984) (tie)

- Nominations: 11
- Wins: 2
- Best picture: nominated
- Oscars Ceremony: 57th

Both “A Passage to India” and “Amadeus” received 11 nominations, this year with “Amadeus” winning a total of eight including Best Picture. An adaptation of an E.M. Forster novel set during the 1920s, the film only won two awards: Musical Score and Supporting Actress for Peggy Ashcroft. Judy Davis was nominated for Best Actress but didn’t win. The film was also nominated for Best Picture, Director, Art Direction, Editing, Cinematography, Sound, Costume Design, and Writing (Adapted Screenplay).

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Paramount Pictures

#42. Sunset Boulevard (1950) (tie)

- Nominations: 11
- Wins: 3
- Best picture: nominated
- Oscars Ceremony: 23rd

Billy Wilder’s quintessential classic of the film noir style and era was up against “All About Eve,” the most nominated film at that time in history. “Sunset Boulevard” won three Oscars, for Art Direction (Black-and-White), Musical Score, and Writing. It was nominated for Best Picture, Director, Editing, and Cinematography (Black-and-White). It also received four acting nominations—Best Actress for star Gloria Swanson, and in the supporting categories Nancy Olson, William Holden, and Erich von Stroheim.

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Twentieth Century Fox

#42. Julia (1977) (tie)

- Nominations: 11
- Wins: 3
- Best picture: nominated
- Oscars Ceremony: 50th

Set in part during World War II, this biopic of literary figure Lillian Hellman (Jane Fonda) dramatizes her friendship with her persecuted friend Julia—Vanessa Redgrave won Supporting Actress for her performance in the role. Jason Robards, as Hellman’s partner Dashiell Hammett, won Supporting Actor over also-nominated co-star Maximilian Schell. The film’s third Oscar was for Writing (Adapted Screenplay). It was also nominated for Best Picture, Director, Best Actress, Editing, Cinematography, Costume Design, and Musical Score.

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Paramount Pictures

#36. Terms of Endearment (1983) (tie)

- Nominations: 11
- Wins: 5
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 56th

It was a huge night for “Terms of Endearment” director James L. Brooks who won for both Directing and Writing the Best Picture winner about the fraught but loving relationship between a mother and her grown daughter. Shirley MacLaine and Debra Winger were both nominated for Best Actress, with MacLaine winning and famously stating “I deserve this” (after four prior losses in the same category). Jack Nicholson won Best Supporting Actor, beating co-star nominee John Lithgow. “Terms of Endearment” also received nominations for Art Direction, Sound, Musical Score, and Editing.

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Romulus Films

#36. Oliver! (1968) (tie)

- Nominations: 11
- Wins: 5
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 41st

The G-rated musical “Oliver” had the most nominations at the 41st Awards, 11, while its closest competitor, fellow musical “Funny Girl,” had eight. “Funny Girl” had just one win—Best Actress for Barbra Streisand who won in a rare tie with Katharine Hepburn for “The Lion in Winter.” Jack Wild as the Artful Dodger and Ron Moody as Fagin each received acting nominations for “Oliver.” The film won Best Picture and Director in addition to Musical Score, Art Direction, and Sound. It was also nominated for Cinematography, Costume Design, Editing, and Writing (Adapted Screenplay).

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Paramount Pictures

#36. Hugo (2011) (tie)

- Nominations: 11
- Wins: 5
- Best picture: nominated
- Oscars Ceremony: 84th

“Hugo” just edged out “The Artist” for most nominations this year, and while the films tied for wins, each with five, “The Artist” received Oscars in the top categories of Best Picture and Director—and also beat “Hugo” in Musical Score and Costume Design. “Hugo” won for Sound Editing, Sound Mixing, Visual Effects, and Art Direction and Cinematography—two categories where it beat “The Artist.” “Hugo” was also nominated for Writing (Adapted Screenplay) and Editing.

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Paramount Pictures

#35. The Godfather Part II (1974)

- Nominations: 11
- Wins: 6
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 47th

“The Godfather Part II” and “Chinatown” tied with 11 nominations each, though “Chinatown” had only one win for Writing (Original Screenplay). “The Godfather Part II” took Best Picture (as did “The Godfather” two years prior). It also won for Best Director, an honor not awarded to Francis Ford Coppola for the first “Godfather” film. Robert De Niro won Best Supporting Actor for his role as Vito Corleone—Marlon Brando previously won for playing the older version of the same character. De Niro won over co-stars Lee Strasberg and Michael V. Gazzo, all nominated in the same category. Al Pacino and Talia Shire were also passed over in the Best Actor and Best Supporting Actress categories. “The Godfather Part II” also won for Art Direction, Original Score, and Writing (Adapted Screenplay). It also received a nomination for Costume Design.

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Mirage Enterprises

#34. Out of Africa (1985)

- Nominations: 11
- Wins: 7
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 58th

“The Color Purple” tied with “Out of Africa” with 11 nominations. Famously, it became one of the few films with the most nominations to not win anything. “The Color Purple” was snubbed as the single Best Picture nominee without a Directing nomination. Director Akira Kurosawa took his slot with “Ran.” “Out of Africa” won Best Picture, as did Sydney Pollack for Directing. It also won for Writing (Adapted Screenplay), Musical Score, Cinematography, Sound, and Art Direction, with additional nominations for Editing, Costume Design, Best Actress (Meryl Streep), and Supporting Actor (Klaus Maria Brandauer).

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International Film Investors

#32. Gandhi (1982) (tie)

- Nominations: 11
- Wins: 8
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 55th

“Gandhi,” the three-plus hour historical biopic, swept the 55th Academy Awards. It won Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Actor for Ben Kingsley as the Indian leader known for nonviolent resistance. “Gandhi” had competition from fellow Best Picture nominees, but prevailed. “Tootsie” (now adapted for Broadway) received 10 nominations, while the watchable classic “E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial” received nine. “Gandhi” also won for Art Direction, Cinematography, Editing, Writing (Original Screenplay), and Costume Design. It received nominations for Musical Score, Sound, and Makeup.

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AMLF

#32. Amadeus (1984) (tie)

- Nominations: 11
- Wins: 8
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 57th

“Amadeus” won in each category it was nominated in, except Editing and Cinematography which both went to “The Killing Fields.” “Amadeus” had two nominees in the Best Actor category with F. Murray Abraham, as the haunted rival of the genius composer, winning over Tom Hulce as Mozart. The film also won Oscars for Art Direction, Costume Design, Makeup, Sound and Writing (Adapted Screenplay), in addition to winning Best Picture and Best Director.

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The Mirisch Corporation

#31. West Side Story (1961)

- Nominations: 11
- Wins: 10
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 34th

“West Side Story” is one of the winningest Oscar-nominated films of all time (it ranks #4), taking all but one of the awards it was nominated for. It lost Writing (Adapted Screenplay) to “Judgment at Nuremberg” which had two wins total though tied with “West Side Story” with 11 nominations. “West Side Story’s” innovative, pop-art style, infused with a social message, secured wins for both Best Picture and Director. It also won for Art Direction, Cinematography, and Costume Design in the Color categories, as well as for Musical Score, Editing, and Sound. Rita Moreno (as Anita) won for Best Supporting Actress, with co-star George Chakiris (as Bernardo) winning Supporting Actor.

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New Line Cinema

#30. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)

- Nominations: 11
- Wins: 11
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 76th

“The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King” has the distinction of achieving a clean sweep, being the only film that won every award for which it was nominated. The third film in “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy surpassed the first installments. “The Fellowship of the Ring” had 13 nominations, but only four wins, while the second film, “The Two Towers,” had six nominations and two wins. “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King” had no acting nominations amid its huge ensemble cast, but was recognized for its technical scope winning Oscars for Best Picture, Directing, Art Direction, Sound Mixing, Musical Score, Original Song, Editing, Visual Effects, Costume Design, Makeup, and Writing (Adapted Screenplay).

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Regency Enterprises

#25. The Revenant (2015) (tie)

- Nominations: 12
- Wins: 3
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 88th

Leonardo DiCaprio won his first Best Actor Oscar for “The Revenant.” It was his fifth nomination for acting, but fans considered his prior work Oscar-worthy in films such as “Titanic” and “The Departed.” Notably, Alejandro G. Iñárritu won Best Director, but in a surprise upset “Spotlight” took Best Picture. It had just six nominations, and only two wins for Best Picture and Writing (Original Screenplay). “The Revenant’s” third Oscar was for Cinematography, and its other nominations were for Editing, Visual Effects, Production Design, Sound Editing, Sound Mixing, Costume Design, and Makeup and Hairstyling—categories in which “Mad Max: Fury Road” would win five of its six Oscars that night. Tom Hardy was also nominated for Supporting Actor for “The Revenant,” but Mark Rylance won for “Bridge of Spies.”

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Barclays Mercantile Industrial Finance

#25. Reds (1981) (tie)

- Nominations: 12
- Wins: 3
- Best picture: nominated
- Oscars Ceremony: 54th

Warren Beatty was up for four awards for “Reds” (for producing, directing, writing, and acting), but took home just one for Best Director. The Best Picture Oscar went to “Chariots of Fire,” in a surprise win. “Reds” (with 12 nominations) and “On Golden Pond” (with 10 nominations) were the Oscar favorites. The crowd-pleasing “Raiders of the Lost Ark” was also in contention with eight nominations to “Chariot’s” seven. “Reds” won just two awards in addition to Director, Supporting Actress (Maureen Stapleton) and Cinematography. It also had nominations for Best Actor and Actress (Beatty and Diane Keaton), Supporting Actor (Jack Nicholson), Art Direction, Film Editing, Sound, Writing (Original Screenplay), and Costume Design.

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Charles K. Feldman Group

#22. A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) (tie)

- Nominations: 12
- Wins: 4
- Best picture: nominated
- Oscars Ceremony: 24th

Though Marlon Brando’s cry, “Stella!,” remains iconic, he didn’t win in the Best Actor category for his turn as Stanley in “A Streetcar Named Desire”—that award went to Humphrey Bogart in “The African Queen.” Brando’s loss was significant since his three nominated co-stars won: Vivien Leigh won Best Actress and both Kim Hunger and Karl Malden won in Supporting acting categories. Brando would win the Best Actor award the next year for “On the Waterfront.” Though “A Streetcar Named Desire” received 12 nominations, its only other win was for Art Direction (Black-and-White.) Its other nominations were for Best Picture, Directing, Cinematography (Black-and-White,) Costume Design (Black-and-White), Sound, and Musical Score. Tennessee Williams was nominated for Writing for adapting his stage play for the screen.

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Twentieth Century Fox

#22. The Song of Bernadette (1943) (tie)

- Nominations: 12
- Wins: 4
- Best picture: nominated
- Oscars Ceremony: 16th

“The Song of Bernadette” had the most nominations and the most wins (just four) at the 16th Academy Awards. “Casablanca” took Best Picture that year, with “The Song of Bernadette” taking Best Actress for Jennifer Jones as Bernadette, a woman who experiences visions of the Virgin Mary in this adaptation of a popular novel based on a true-life figure. The film also won for Art Direction and Cinematography in the Black-and-White categories, as well as for Musical Score. It received nominations for Best Picture (then Outstanding Motion Picture), Directing, Editing, Writing, Sound Recording, Supporting Actor and also had two nominations in the Supporting Actress category.

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See-Saw Films

#22. The King's Speech (2010) (tie)

- Nominations: 12
- Wins: 4
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 83rd

“The King’s Speech” received 12 nominations and won four, all in major categories: Best Picture, Director, Writing (Original Screenplay), and Best Actor for Colin Firth as a king who stammers. The film was also nominated for Musical Score, Cinematography, Costume Design, Sound Mixing, Film Editing, and Art Direction, with Supporting Actor and Actress nominations for Geoffrey Rush and Helena Bonham Carter, respectively.

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DreamWorks

#21. Gladiator (2000)

- Nominations: 12
- Wins: 5
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 73rd

“Gladiator” won two major awards, Best Picture, as well as Best Actor for Russell Crowe as the undaunted fighter. However, Ridley Scott, nominated for Best Director, lost to Steven Soderbergh for “Traffic.” “Gladiator” also won for Costume Design, Visual Effects, and Sound. It was nominated for Art Direction, Cinematography, Editing, Musical Score, and Writing (Original Screenplay). Joaquin Phoenix was also nominated for Supporting Actor, but lost to Benicio Del Toro in “Traffic.”

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Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

#20. Mrs. Miniver (1942)

- Nominations: 12
- Wins: 6
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 15th

Set during World War II and released during the conflict, “Mrs. Miniver” presents a sentimental view of patriotic sacrifice. Greer Garson, as a longsuffering housewife, won Best Actress. “Mrs. Miniver” won Best Picture (then called Outstanding Motion Picture), Directing, Writing and Cinematography (Black-and-White) in addition to Supporting Actress, where Teresa Wright won over co-star nominee Dame May Whitty. “Mrs. Miniver” also had nominations for Best Actor and Supporting Actor, as well as Film Editing, Special Effects, and Sound Recording.

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Universal Pictures

#18. Schindler's List (1993) (tie)

- Nominations: 12
- Wins: 7
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 66th

“Schindler’s List” was the most-nominated film at the 66th Academy Awards after critical acclaim for its notable visual design, thematic use of color within Black-and-White Cinematography, and subject of historical import. Steven Spielberg won his first Directing award (and notably directed mega-hit “Jurassic Park” released the same year). “Schindler’s List” won Best Picture, in addition to Cinematography, Art Direction, Editing, Adapted Screenplay, and Musical Score. It did not garner awards for Liam Neeson or Ralph Fiennes, nominated for Best Actor and Supporting Actor. It was also nominated for Sound, Costume Design, and Makeup.

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Tig Productions

#18. Dances With Wolves (1990) (tie)

- Nominations: 12
- Wins: 7
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 63rd

Kevin Costner won Best Director for his directorial debut, but lost Best Actor to Jeremy Irons in “Reversal of Fortune.” “Dances With Wolves” lost in Art Direction, Costume Design, and its three acting nominations, including Supporting Actor (Graham Greene) and Supporting Actress (Mary McDonnell). It won Best Picture over notable nominees “Ghost,” Goodfellas,” and “The Godfather Part III” (the two previous installments each won Best Picture in 1972 and 1974). “Dances With Wolves” also took home Oscars in Cinematography, Sound, Musical Score, Editing, and Adapted Screenplay.

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Horizon Pictures

#16. On the Waterfront (1954) (tie)

- Nominations: 12
- Wins: 8
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 27th

Marlon Brando was nominated for Best Actor four consecutive years in a row, finally winning for “On the Waterfront” as the troubled boxer with the iconic line “I coulda been a contender.” Eva Marie Saint won Best Supporting Actress—her scenes with Brando showing their naturalized, “method” acting style. Brando’s co-stars Karl Malden, Lee J. Cobb, and Rod Steiger filled the Supporting Actor category with three nominations, but that award went to Edmond O’Brien for “The Barefoot Contessa.” The only other loss was for Musical Score. “On the Waterfront” took Best Picture and Director (for Elia Kazan), as well as awards in Art Direction, Cinematography (Black-and-White), Editing, and Writing.

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Warner Bros.

#16. My Fair Lady (1964) (tie)

- Nominations: 12
- Wins: 8
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 37th

At the 37th Academy Awards two musicals competed for the top awards with “Mary Poppins” at 13 nominations up against “My Fair Lady” with 12. Julie Andrews won Best Actress for her turn as the perfectly polished nanny—notably Audrey Hepburn (whose singing was dubbed) was not nominated for her vibrant portrayal of Eliza Doolittle. Her co-star Rex Harrison, as the stuffy language prof, won Best Actor. “My Fair Lady” won Best Picture with a Directing Oscar for George Cukor, and it also won Oscars for Sound, Musical Score (Adapted), Costume Design (Color), Art Direction (Color), and Cinematography (Color). It received two supporting acting nominations for Gladys Cooper and Stanley Holloway. It was also nominated for Writing (Adapted Screenplay) and Editing.

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Miramax

#15. The English Patient (1996)

- Nominations: 12
- Wins: 9
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 69th

“The English Patient” nearly swept the 69th Academy Awards, losing in three categories, both leading acting and in Adapted Screenplay, an award that would’ve gone to Anthony Minghella who was not empty-handed that evening due to his Best Director Oscar. Geoffrey Rush won Best Actor for “Shine” won over Ralph Fiennes, while Kristin Scott Thomas lost Best Actress to Frances McDormand for her now-iconic portrayal of pregnant police chief Marge Gunderson in “Fargo.” Juliette Binoche won Supporting Actress. “The English Patient” beat “Fargo” for Best Picture, and also won Cinematography, Editing, Sound, Musical Score, Costume Design, and Art Direction.

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Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

#14. Ben-Hur (1959)

- Nominations: 12
- Wins: 11
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 32nd

“Ben-Hur” received 12 nominations, and holds a three-way tie with “Titanic” and “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King” for the most Oscar wins, 11 total. The big-budget biblical epic with a nearly four-hour running time was a box office hit and took the major awards that year for Best Picture, Director (William Wyler), and Best Actor (Charlton Heston). It also won Supporting Actor (Hugh Griffith), Art Direction (Color), Costume Design (Color), Cinematography (Color), Sound, Musical Score, Special Effects, and Editing. Its single loss was for Writing (Adapted Screenplay).

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Warner Bros.

#13. The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008)

- Nominations: 13
- Wins: 3
- Best picture: nominated
- Oscars Ceremony: 81st

“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” received a whopping 13 nominations—its closest competition that year was “Slumdog Millionaire” with 10. However, while “Slumdog Millionaire” would go on to win eight awards, including Best Picture, “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” won just three in categories recognizing its technical achievement creating a man who ages in reverse: Art Direction, Visual Effects, Makeup. In addition to Best Picture, it was nominated for Directing, Editing, Cinematography, Sound Mixing, Costume Design, Writing (Adapted Screenplay), and Musical Score. Taraji P. Henson received a Best Supporting Actress nomination and Brad Pitt received his second acting nomination, this time for Best Actor.

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Double Dare You (DDY)

#11. The Shape of Water (2017) (tie)

- Nominations: 13
- Wins: 4
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 90th

Oscars for fantasy films are still relatively rare, but the stylish creature romance “The Shape of Water” won Best Picture (and Best Director for Guillermo del Toro), in addition to Production Design and Musical Score. Sally Hawkins was nominated for Best Actress, Octavia Spencer for Supporting Actress, as well as Richard Jenkins for Supporting Actor. The film was also nominated for Cinematography, Costume Design, Editing, Sound Editing, Sound Mixing, and Original Screenplay.

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New Line Cinema

#11. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001) (tie)

- Nominations: 13
- Wins: 4
- Best picture: nominated
- Oscars Ceremony: 74th

The first installment of “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy received more nominations than the third, which still holds the record for sweeping every category in which it was nominated, all 11. “The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring” won only for Cinematography, Musical Score, Visual Effects, and Makeup—it had the same number of wins as Best Picture winner “A Beautiful Mind.” Its other nominations were for Best Picture, Directing, Adapted Screenplay, Costume Design, Editing, Original Song, Sound, and Art Direction. Ian McKellen was nominated for Supporting Actor for his role as the wizard Gandalf.

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Warner Bros.

#9. Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966) (tie)

- Nominations: 13
- Wins: 5
- Best picture: nominated
- Oscars Ceremony: 39th

“Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?,” a searing drama about two married couples, scored nominations in all four acting categories. Elizabeth Taylor (married to co-star Richard Burton at the time) and Sandy Dennis won Best Actress and Supporting Actress, respectively, but co-stars Burton and George Segal lost in the Actor and Supporting Actor categories. The film also won for Art Direction (Black-and-White), Cinematography (Black-and-White), and Costume Design (Black-and-White). “A Man for All Seasons” won Best Picture and Director that year. “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” received 13 nominations in every major category including Directing (Mike Nichols in his debut), Editing, Writing (Adapted Screenplay), Musical Score, and Sound.

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Walt Disney Productions

#9. Mary Poppins (1964) (tie)

- Nominations: 13
- Wins: 5
- Best picture: nominated
- Oscars Ceremony: 37th

Disney’s inspired hit “Mary Poppins” was up against “My Fair Lady,” edging it out in nominations with 13 to its 12, but won just five awards compared to “My Fair Lady’s” eight, which included Best Picture. Julie Andrews won Best Actress (she would not win the following year for “The Sound of Music”). The film also took home Oscars for Editing, Special Visual Effects (recognizing the integration of live-action with animation), Musical Score (Original), and Song (“Chim Chim Cher-ee”). It was also nominated for—but lost to “My Fair Lady”—Art Direction (Color), Cinematography (Color), Costume Design (Color), Sound, Musical Score (Adapted), Sound, and Directing. Both titan musicals lost in the Writing (Adapted Screenplay) category to “Becket.”

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Paramount Pictures

#7. Forrest Gump (1994) (tie)

- Nominations: 13
- Wins: 6
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 67th

“Forrest Gump” won Best Picture over both “Pulp Fiction” (which won just one award for Original Screenplay) and “The Shawshank Redemption” (which was shut out of all awards)—both films with enduring popularity in subsequent years. Tom Hanks won Best Actor for the second year in a row after his win for “Philadelphia” released in 1993. “Forrest Gump” also took awards for Directing, Visual Effects, Adapted Screenplay, and Editing. It was nominated for Musical Score, Art Direction, Makeup, Cinematography, Sound, and Sound Effects Editing. Gary Sinise was nominated for Supporting Actor for his role as Lieutenant Dan, but lost to Martin Landau in “Ed Wood.”

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Miramax

#7. Chicago (2002) (tie)

- Nominations: 13
- Wins: 6
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 75th

“Chicago” had 13 nominations, with its closest competition being “Gangs of New York” with 10—it didn’t win any. “Chicago” won Best Picture, but lost in the Directing category to Roman Polanski for “The Pianist.” Renée Zellweger lost in the Best Actress category to Nicole Kidman in “The Hours.” Both Queen Latifah and Catherine Zeta-Jones were nominated for Supporting Actress, with Zeta-Jones taking the Oscar. John C. Reilly was nominated for Supporting Actor, but didn’t win. The movie’s additional wins were for Costume Design, Art Direction, Editing, and Sound. “Chicago” also had nominations in Writing (Adapted Screenplay), Cinematography, and Original Song—instead the Eminem hit “Lose Yourself” won for “8 Mile.”

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Universal Pictures

#6. Shakespeare in Love (1998)

- Nominations: 13
- Wins: 7
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 71st

“Shakespeare in Love” (13 nominations) was a feel-good romance in comparison with the brutal “Saving Private Ryan,” which had 11 nominations that same year. Steven Spielberg won Best Director over John Madden, nominated for “Shakespeare in Love,” but the romance took Best Picture in what was a surprising split. Gwyneth Paltrow won Best Actress, while Judy Dench won Supporting Actress. Dench referenced her mere eight minutes of screen time during her acceptance speech. Geoffrey Rush was nominated in the Supporting Actor category, though he didn’t win. The period film also won for Costume Design, Art Direction, Musical Score, and Original Screenplay. It received nominations in Editing, Makeup, Cinematography, and Sound.

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Selznick International Pictures

#4. Gone With the Wind (1939) (tie)

- Nominations: 13
- Wins: 8
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 12th

Hattie McDaniel became the first black actor to win an Academy Award (for Supporting Actress) for her portrayal of the enslaved Mammy. She was not allowed to sit at the “Gone With the Wind” table at the ceremony, but instead was seated at a “small table set against a far wall,” since The Ambassador Hotel didn’t allow black people to enter. She won over Olivia de Havilland, her co-star nominated in the same category. Clark Gable was overlooked in the Best Actor category for what became an iconic performance as the rogue Rhett Butler. Vivien Leigh won Best Actress for her portrayal of Southern belle Scarlett O’Hara in the epic Best Picture winner (at the time titled Outstanding Production). The film was also recognized for its technical achievement with wins in Cinematography (Color), Editing, Art Direction, Writing, and Directing. It was nominated for Musical Score, Sound Recording, and Special Effects.

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Columbia Pictures

#4. From Here to Eternity (1953) (tie)

- Nominations: 13
- Wins: 8
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 26th

Neither Burt Lancaster nor Deborah Kerr won Oscars in the lead acting categories, despite sharing one of cinema’s most iconic kisses, as they entwine amid crashing waves in this story about the days just before the attack on Pearl Harbor. Montgomery Clift was also nominated for Best Actor, but the acting awards went to Supporting Actor and Actress nominees Frank Sinatra and Donna Reed. The film won Best Motion Picture, in addition to awards for Directing, Cinematography (Black-and-White), Writing, Sound Recording, and Editing. It was also nominated for Musical Score and Costume Design.

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Summit Entertainment

#2. La La Land (2016) (tie)

- Nominations: 14
- Wins: 6
- Best picture: nominated
- Oscars Ceremony: 89th

“La La Land” seemed a clear favorite to sweep the Oscars with nearly double the nominations of the sci-fi “Arrival” and artsy “Moonlight” with eight each. “Arrival” won just one award, while “Moonlight” took three, including Best Picture over the favored “La La Land,” which was given the award in error during the broadcast. “La La Land” won Best Director and Best Actress, as well as Original Score, Cinematography, Production Design, and Original Song where it was nominated twice—“City of Stars” won over “Audition (The Fools Who Dream).” It was also nominated for Sound Editing, Sound Mixing, Editing, Costume Design, Writing (Original Screenplay), and for Best Actor—Ryan Gosling lost to Casey Affleck in “Manchester by the Sea.”

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Twentieth Century Fox

#2. All About Eve (1950) (tie)

- Nominations: 14
- Wins: 6
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 23rd

“All About Eve” still holds the record as the film with the most Oscar nominations, although “Titanic” joined in a tie in 1997, as well as “La La Land” in 2016. The drama about scheming actresses was shut out of wins in both actress categories despite a total of four nominees. Bette Davis and Anne Baxter were nominated for Best Actress, and Thelma Ritter and Celeste Holm were nominated for Supporting Actress. George Sanders won for Best Supporting Actor, and “All About Eve” won five additional Academy Awards including Best Motion Picture, Director, Costume Design, Sound Recording, and Writing. It was also nominated for Cinematography (Black-and-White), Art Direction, Musical Score, and Editing.

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Twentieth Century Fox

#1. Titanic (1997)

- Nominations: 14
- Wins: 11
- Best picture: won
- Oscars Ceremony: 70th

“Titanic” has the distinction of having the most Oscar nominations, 14, tied with “All About Eve” and “La La Land” which each won six out of 14. “Titanic” won 11, tied for the most wins with “Ben-Hur” nominated for 12, and “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King” which won in all 11 nominated categories. “Titanic” lost in Makeup (to “Men in Black”), and in the two acting categories, Actress and Supporting Actress, for which it achieved nominations. At the time, Leonardo DiCaprio’s lack of recognition in the Best Actor category was considered a snub. “Titanic” won Best Picture and Director (for James Cameron), as well as awards for Musical Score, Original Song (the pop hit “My Heart Will Go On”), Visual Effects, Cinematography, Sound, Sound Effects Editing, Costume Design, Art Direction, and Editing.

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