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Fastest-growing cities of the decade

  • Fastest-growing cities of the decade

    The United States is growing. Since 2010, the national population has increased 5.96%, or 18,409,429 residents. The states that led in population growth were Texas, Florida, Utah, Colorado, and the District of Columbia.

    While the population growth is largely due to increases in birth rates and immigration, the states also have experienced state-to-state migration. The ones suffering the most from out-migration were West Virginia, Illinois, Connecticut, Vermont, and Rhode Island.

    There are many reasons why someone would choose to move and settle in another area. While access to jobs is important, lifestyle, educational opportunities, amenities, and cost of living are also considerations. The Sun Belt—the strip of states that include much of the South and the Southwest—for example, has seen significant population growth since the 1960s due to the influx of retirees and the availability of air conditioning. This area has not only seen the rise of resort areas, but new manufacturing and educational opportunities due to the increased population.

    To best illustrate how the nation has changed, Stacker compiled data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey for the years of 2010 and 2018 (the most recent year) to rank which 50 cities grew the most this decade. The cities are ranked by the nine-year change in population, and ties are broken by the total population in 2018.

    It should be noted that 16 of the cities profiled are in Texas, with only seven cities located outside the Sun Belt. The combination of warm weather, significant manufacturing and industrial investment, and access to jobs have encouraged significant influxes of new residents. Areas that have seen new development or have recently expanded saw large population increases.

    Other communities, such as those that are both conveniently commutable to large industrial centers and have low property prices, may have also seen population increases. These communities—called sleeper towns or bedroom communities—may not have an industrial base of their own, but are close enough to a major municipality to accommodate for this. Some bedroom communities are fully developed cities in their own right, with a well-established commercial and industrial base.

    Keep reading to see if your city made our list.

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  • #50. Concord, North Carolina

    - Total population in 2010: 79,330
    - Total population in 2018: 94,134 (+18.7% nine-year change)
    --- Population under age 5: 5.6% (0.6% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 5-19: 21.3% (1.8% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 20-44: 31.9% (34.7% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 45-64: 27.4% (-1.7% lower than 2010)
    --- Population ages 65-84: 12.1% (-2.5% lower than 2010)
    --- Population over age 85: 1.7% (-1.0% lower than 2010)

    Concord is the county seat of Cabarrus County and the second-largest city in the Charlotte Metropolitan Area. Growth in jobs creation in Charlotte is a major factor in Concord’s spike. The home of NASCAR’s Charlotte Motor Speedway, a NASCAR Research and Development office, and several racing teams, the city is a major one in the car racing community. Concord is also home to the shopping mall Concord Mills.

     

  • #49. Menifee, California

    - Total population in 2010: 78,018
    - Total population in 2018: 92,602 (+18.7% nine-year change)
    --- Population under age 5: 6.2% (0.8% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 5-19: 20.8% (-0.1% lower than 2010)
    --- Population ages 20-44: 32.1% (28.3% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 45-64: 22.5% (-0.4% lower than 2010)
    --- Population ages 65-84: 15.6% (2.4% higher than 2010)
    --- Population over age 85: 2.6% (1.2% higher than 2010)

    A city 15 miles north of Temecula, Menifee is a city located geographically in the center of the Southern California region. Bordered by Canyon Lake, Lake Elsinore and Murrieta, Menifee is a highly affluent part of the Los Angeles Statistical Area. Growth can be attributed to its job market increase and planned community construction.

     

  • #48. Gilbert, Arizona

    - Total population in 2010: 209,007
    - Total population in 2018: 248,269 (+18.8% nine-year change)
    --- Population under age 5: 7.0% (1.1% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 5-19: 26.0% (-2.1% lower than 2010)
    --- Population ages 20-44: 32.6% (37.5% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 45-64: 24.2% (0.5% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 65-84: 9.1% (-3.5% lower than 2010)
    --- Population over age 85: 1.3% (-1.1% lower than 2010)

    The fifth-largest city in the Phoenix metropolitan area, Gilbert has grown due to its highly diverse economic base. Formerly the “Hay Shipping Capital of the World,” the city had an agricultural base until the 1980s.

     

  • #47. Charlotte, North Carolina

    - Total population in 2010: 734,418
    - Total population in 2018: 872,506 (+18.8% nine-year change)
    --- Population under age 5: 6.3% (1.4% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 5-19: 19.2% (1.2% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 20-44: 39.5% (40.3% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 45-64: 24.1% (-1.1% lower than 2010)
    --- Population ages 65-84: 9.8% (-2.4% lower than 2010)
    --- Population over age 85: 1.0% (0.3% higher than 2010)

    Charlotte is the most populous city in North Carolina and the 17th largest city by population in the nation. The major city and its surrounding communities host two NASCAR Cup Series races, the NASCAR Hall of Fame, and several NASCAR teams. Charlotte is also the home of the Carolina Panthers, Charlotte Hornets, and the PGA Tour’s Wells Fargo Championship.

     

  • #46. Santa Clarita, California

    - Total population in 2010: 176,535
    - Total population in 2018: 210,085 (+19.0% nine-year change)
    --- Population under age 5: 7.5% (-1.5% lower than 2010)
    --- Population ages 5-19: 20.1% (3.1% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 20-44: 31.2% (33.5% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 45-64: 28.6% (-0.9% lower than 2010)
    --- Population ages 65-84: 11.2% (-2.8% lower than 2010)
    --- Population over age 85: 1.4% (-0.2% lower than 2010)

    Robert E. Lang of the Metropolitan Institute at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University came up with the notion of a “boomburg,” which is a suburb with more than 100,000 residents that grew more than 10% in consecutive censuses and is not considered a core component of its metropolitan areas. While most of the entries on this list are “boomburgs,” Santa Clarita is the definitive one—a suburb of Los Angeles, the city can attribute its population growth to annexation.

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  • #45. Spring Valley, Nevada

    - Total population in 2010: 179,830
    - Total population in 2018: 214,161 (+19.1% nine-year change)
    --- Population under age 5: 6.3% (0.2% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 5-19: 15.9% (1.2% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 20-44: 38.6% (40.2% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 45-64: 25.2% (-0.1% lower than 2010)
    --- Population ages 65-84: 12.4% (-2.2% lower than 2010)
    --- Population over age 85: 1.6% (-0.6% lower than 2010)

    An unincorporated town in the Las Vegas Township, Spring Valley is located only two miles west of the Strip. Originally a planned community that lies on the former site of the Stardust International Raceway, the town has grown to occupy most of the southwestern quarter of the Las Vegas Valley. The recent growth is due in large part to migration—particularly from California—and its late development relative to the rest of the region.

     

  • #44. Indio, California

    - Total population in 2010: 76,512
    - Total population in 2018: 91,235 (+19.2% nine-year change)
    --- Population under age 5: 5.0% (2.1% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 5-19: 11.2% (16.0% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 20-44: 34.4% (30.0% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 45-64: 28.2% (-6.9% lower than 2010)
    --- Population ages 65-84: 20.3% (-7.7% lower than 2010)
    --- Population over age 85: 1.0% (0.9% higher than 2010)

    The home of the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, Indio has been nicknamed the City of Festivals. Located 23 miles east of Palm Springs and 127 miles east of Los Angeles, Indio got its post-railroad start as a winter retreat for the elderly. The city started to grow with the burning of nearby Thermal. After years of losing population to Palm Desert, the trend has reversed recently.

     

  • #43. St. George, Utah

    - Total population in 2010: 73,078
    - Total population in 2018: 87,178 (+19.3% nine-year change)
    --- Population under age 5: 6.8% (1.4% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 5-19: 19.7% (4.4% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 20-44: 30.5% (31.7% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 45-64: 19.0% (-1.3% lower than 2010)
    --- Population ages 65-84: 20.6% (-5.5% lower than 2010)
    --- Population over age 85: 3.6% (-0.3% lower than 2010)

    The county seat of Washington County, St. George sits on Utah’s southern border with Arizona. The state’s largest city by population outside the Wasatch Front, St. George is the fastest-growing city in the nation, as of 2018. The city’s growth is bolstered by SkyWest Airlines headquarters located in the city, as well as distribution centers for WalMart and Family Dollar. A large part of the area’s business comes from tourism; the Grand Canyon, Zion National Park, and Bryce Canyon are all nearby.

     

  • #42. Orlando, Florida

    - Total population in 2010: 239,037
    - Total population in 2018: 285,705 (+19.5% nine-year change)
    --- Population under age 5: 6.8% (0.8% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 5-19: 14.4% (2.5% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 20-44: 45.1% (44.3% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 45-64: 22.7% (-0.3% lower than 2010)
    --- Population ages 65-84: 9.5% (-1.6% lower than 2010)
    --- Population over age 85: 1.4% (-0.5% lower than 2010)

    One of the largest amusement park destination cities, Orlando has seen a recent resurgence. While the city proper has a population of 285,713 in 2018, the Orlando Metropolitan Area—which serves host to Walt Disney World, Universal Orlando Resort, SeaWorld Orlando, and ICON Park—has a population of 2,509,831. The city is the home of the University of Central Florida, which has the largest university campus in the nation in terms of enrollment.

     

  • #41. Durham, North Carolina

    - Total population in 2010: 229,029
    - Total population in 2018: 274,497 (+19.9% nine-year change)
    --- Population under age 5: 6.7% (1.0% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 5-19: 17.5% (1.1% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 20-44: 40.6% (42.3% higher than 2010)
    --- Population ages 45-64: 22.9% (-1.0% lower than 2010)
    --- Population ages 65-84: 11.1% (-3.4% lower than 2010)
    --- Population over age 85: 1.2% (0.5% higher than 2010)

    One corner of North Carolina’s “Research Triangle,” Durham has emerged as a leading research and innovation center, accounting for its recent growth. The home of Duke University, the city has become a national leader in health and health research.

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