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States receiving the most federal housing funding

  • States receiving the most federal housing funding

    Housing assistance is a big topic for Democrats on the 2020 presidential campaign trail. While they all state that they want to fix issues with affordable housing, they take different approaches. Some have taken the stance to loosen zoning laws in cities and towns, and some want to tackle the lack of housing supply. Elizabeth Warren, Cory Booker, and Julián Castro have all proposed plans to tackle the lack of housing and reform zoning.

    Taking a different approach, Bernie Sanders proposed a housing plan that views housing as a right for all citizens. At the forefront, his $2.5 trillion plan includes national rent control, ending homelessness, and makes federal housing assistance an entitlement for citizens. He hopes to encourage homeownership through boosting affordable housing stock as well as prioritizing funding to rehabilitate existing affordable housing.

    While there are many ideas on how to fix the nation’s affordable housing crisis on the table, the current state of affordable housing is largely dependent on grants from the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The amounts and allocations of the grants from HUD depend on the results of each state’s census. Once the census is conducted, states’ needs are assessed and money is allocated toward specific and general needs.

    In Maryland, there is a large need for funding for rat extermination to keep living standards up to par for residents. In Hawaii, there was a need for relief funding for repairs to homes and roads after the Kilauea eruption last year. Some states need funding to revitalize neglected existing housing to make it livable for residents. While some states have very specific needs, almost all of the states are deficient in funding for affordable housing development and lead abatement. Both of these issues are urgent and solving them essential to creating secure and safe housing for this country’s residents. But how is the federal funding for housing allocated?

    Stacker used the most recent data from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, to assess which states received the most federal funding for housing/rental assistance. The 50 states and Washington D.C. are then ranked by the federal housing funding they received per capita in 2018. 2018 state populations from the U.S. Census Bureau are also included, as well as the number of people on rental assistance, the percentage of people who are children, seniors, or have a disability who get this assistance, the median rent in the state, and how many low-income earners spend over half of their income on housing. Further methodology and release dates for specific data collected on May 9, 2019, are available in CBPP’s 2019 Federal Rental Assistance Factsheets Sources and Methodology.

    Click through the slideshow to see the hurdles that public housing faces in each state.

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  • #51. Utah

    Federal funding received by state: $148,000,000 ($46.82 per capita)
    - State population: 3,161,105
    - People on rental assistance: 41,500 (13.1 out of every 1,000 residents)
    --- Assisted people who are children, seniors, or have a disability: 75%
    - Median rent: $990 (15% increase in rent since 2001)
    - Low-income earners paying over 50% of income on housing: 142,500 (45.1 out of every 1,000 residents)

    While Utah is relatively affordable to live in, there has been a rise in demand for inexpensive apartments. In many areas of the state, rents continue to climb, and one of the major sources of loans for Utah’s Affordable Housing projects—the Olene Walker Housing Loan Fund—is starting to run low on cash. This jeopardizes the 41,500 residents who rely on rental assistance.

  • #50. Arizona

    Federal funding received by state: $357,000,000 ($49.78 per capita)
    - State population: 7,171,646
    - People on rental assistance: 107,100 (14.9 out of every 1,000 residents)
    --- Assisted people who are children, seniors, or have a disability: 70%
    - Median rent: $1,020 (13% increase in rent since 2001)
    - Low-income earners paying over 50% of income on housing: 491,000 (68.5 out of every 1,000 residents)

    As rents continue to rise in Arizona, residents’ wages are only just now starting to catch up, but there’s a lot to be made up for. Most of the federal subsidies are currently being allocated to homeownership subsidies, which exclude most low-income earners. Most recently, Arizona allocated $15 million to its Housing Trust Fund. It is one of the largest investments ever made in housing and homelessness that it’s seen in more than a decade.

  • #49. Idaho

    Federal funding received by state: $94,000,000 ($53.59 per capita)
    - State population: 1,754,208
    - People on rental assistance: 31,200 (17.8 out of every 1,000 residents)
    --- Assisted people who are children, seniors, or have a disability: 76%
    - Median rent: $820 (9% increase in rent since 2001)
    - Low-income earners paying over 50% of income on housing: 71,400 (40.7 out of every 1,000 residents)

    Idaho has a severe shortage of homes that are affordable to extremely low-income households, whose incomes are at or below the poverty line. This group makes up 24% of residents across Idaho. Currently there is a shortage of 23,348 affordable housing homes that are available to extremely low-income households.

  • #48. Kansas

    Federal funding received by state: $199,000,000 ($68.35 per capita)
    - State population: 2,911,505
    - People on rental assistance: 62,800 (21.6 out of every 1,000 residents)
    --- Assisted people who are children, seniors, or have a disability: 74%
    - Median rent: $820 (5% increase in rent since 2001)
    - Low-income earners paying over 50% of income on housing: 157,800 (54.2 out of every 1,000 residents)

    While housing costs continue to rise in Kansas, state wages have yet to catch up. This leaves 30% of low-income households paying more than 50% of their wages toward rent. And with state funding limitations, many of these low-income households are still not receiving rental assistance.

  • #47. Texas

    Federal funding received by state: $2,074,000,000 ($72.26 per capita)
    - State population: 28,701,845
    - People on rental assistance: 631,000 (22.0 out of every 1,000 residents)
    --- Assisted people who are children, seniors, or have a disability: 70%
    - Median rent: $990 (13% increase in rent since 2001)
    - Low-income earners paying over 50% of income on housing: 1,924,600 (67.1 out of every 1,000 residents)

    While undocumented immigrants have never qualified for housing assistance, Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is changing its rules to state that if there is even one member of a household who is undocumented, that household may not apply for any assistance such as rent vouchers—or risk being evicted. Mixed-status families—who comprise 1% or less of those who get housing assistance in Austin, Dallas, Houston, and San Antonio—might include undocumented parents with children who were born in the U.S.

    While HUD’s analysis claimed the change means $179 million to $210 million more each year going to citizens instead of mixed-status families, critics say the money doesn’t come as actual benefits but rather as prorated rental rates based on the number of documented tenants.

  • #46. Wyoming

    Federal funding received by state: $42,000,000 ($72.70 per capita)
    - State population: 577,737
    - People on rental assistance: 9,800 (17.0 out of every 1,000 residents)
    --- Assisted people who are children, seniors, or have a disability: 74%
    - Median rent: $830 (29% increase in rent since 2001)
    - Low-income earners paying over 50% of income on housing: 25,400 (44.0 out of every 1,000 residents)

    As of 2016, Wyoming’s federal housing funding has been extended in the form of grants to the tribes of the Wind River Indian Reservation. They received $3.8 million to put toward creating more affordable housing for the low-income families of the Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho tribes. This was a boon for a critical population group in Wyoming that is often neglected.

  • #45. Iowa

    Federal funding received by state: $232,000,000 ($73.51 per capita)
    - State population: 3,156,145
    - People on rental assistance: 71,300 (22.6 out of every 1,000 residents)
    --- Assisted people who are children, seniors, or have a disability: 75%
    - Median rent: $760 (4% increase in rent since 2001)
    - Low-income earners paying over 50% of income on housing: 128,400 (40.7 out of every 1,000 residents)

    Iowans, facing many of the same issues that come with rising home costs as other states, are navigating a crisis of Section 8 voucher discrimination. For residents to keep their rent to less than 30% of their incomes, the government has a limited amount of vouchers to cover the remainder of the rent for low-income households. While residents are already facing a deficiency of these vouchers, those lucky enough to receive them are being discriminated against by landlords who are reluctant to accept rent applications with Section 8 vouchers.

  • #44. Wisconsin

    Federal funding received by state: $442,000,000 ($76.03 per capita)
    - State population: 5,813,568
    - People on rental assistance: 131,400 (22.6 out of every 1,000 residents)
    --- Assisted people who are children, seniors, or have a disability: 75%
    - Median rent: $820 (0% increase in rent since 2001)
    - Low-income earners paying over 50% of income on housing: 306,000 (52.6 out of every 1,000 residents)

    Housing discrimination isn’t an issue that’s restricted to the state of Iowa. Because of this rampant issue, this year HUD awarded an additional $15 million to many states, including $250,000 to Wisconsin, to promote fair housing. The grants will go toward the work of fair-housing organizations that will guard residents against discrimination.

  • #43. Nevada

    Federal funding received by state: $231,000,000 ($76.13 per capita)
    - State population: 3,034,392
    - People on rental assistance: 59,000 (19.4 out of every 1,000 residents)
    --- Assisted people who are children, seniors, or have a disability: 70%
    - Median rent: $1,050 (1% increase in rent since 2001)
    - Low-income earners paying over 50% of income on housing: 224,600 (74.0 out of every 1,000 residents)

    As this presidential administration has pushed through more housing funding cuts, the existing crop of public housing in states like Nevada have gone into disrepair. Because of this, HUD has turned to private companies to assist and fund renovations of public-housing complexes. In return, private companies receive a tax cut. While the actual results of this program are unclear, it is a creative solution to better public housing for the state’s residents.

  • #42. Nebraska

    Federal funding received by state: $152,000,000 ($78.79 per capita)
    - State population: 1,929,268
    - People on rental assistance: 53,800 (27.9 out of every 1,000 residents)
    --- Assisted people who are children, seniors, or have a disability: 72%
    - Median rent: $800 (7% increase in rent since 2001)
    - Low-income earners paying over 50% of income on housing: 92,500 (47.9 out of every 1,000 residents)

    Nebraska is facing the same issues as many states and federal funding for housing, including a shortage of low-income housing and public housing falling into disrepair. Recently the state received a grant for affordable public housing in tribal communities.

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