Skip to main content

Main Area

Main

States with the fastest growing rent

1/
Canva

States with the fastest-growing rent

Since the start of the 21st century, the cost of rent has exploded across America. Every state and territory in the United States has seen a spike in the cost of rental units for their citizens. Places like D.C. and Hawaii have seen rent prices more than double over the past 17 years.

Rent in America has grown for a myriad of reasons. Rental prices are a natural function of the market and tend to increase regularly as the economy undergoes inflation. The recent skyrocketing cost of rental housing is mostly tied to a rapid increase in demand for rental units that outpaces the supply of available housing.

The major factor for the increase in demand for rental units is largely tied to the decline in homeownership across America. As owning a home becomes less and less affordable for middle- and low-income Americans—in large part because of growing income inequality—they turn to rental markets, which enable costs to be pushed up at a significantly higher rate than in previous years. Aside from the decline in home buying, demand has also risen because of population increases; as more people are born in America, immigrate here, or attend school here, the greater the need for rental units to be available.

The supply of available rental units is low due to a few common reasons: Across many states, the rising cost of constructing rental units and construction labor shortages are slowing down the pace of new housing. Some states like Oregon have regulations that cap how many and how much construction can be done at a given time. Other states such as Hawaii are geographically constricted and have hard limits on how much housing can be built.

The lack of housing regulations represents another factor for skyrocketing rent costs: Few states possess housing regulations on landlords raising rent. Rent control laws are only official in Oregon, the District of Columbia, and New York, while select cities in Maryland, California, and New Jersey possess such regulations as well. Federal and state governments have not kept up enough incentives or subsidiaries for development companies to build affordable or sustainable housing, which prevents cheaper housing from being built in many areas.

The increase in rental prices affects states differently. Some, such as Idaho, have seen median rent prices grow at the same rate as median income. Others, such as Michigan, have felt a much more painful housing crunch because the median rent prices have grown at twice the rate of wages.

Stacker compiled a list of states with the fastest-growing rent using the most recent data from the Census Bureau. The 50 states and D.C. are ranked by the percentage increase of their median rental prices from 2000 to 2017. The list also includes the percentage increase of the median household income in the same time frame. Read on to see how different states stack up with rent hikes.

You may also like: Best affordable place to live in every state

2/
Tim Kiser // Wikimedia Commons

#51. Ohio

- 2000 median rent: $515
- 2017 median rent: $772
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 49.9%

- 2000 median household income: $42,962
- 2017 median household income: $60,688
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 41.3%

Ohio is one of the states where the rent growth has almost evenly correlated with household income growth, though income growth lags behind rent growth. Ohio’s slow growth can be linked with the fact that the average person makes a smaller salary than what is needed to afford an apartment there. Ohio has no rent housing regulations.

3/
Canva

#50. Nevada

- 2000 median rent: $699
- 2017 median rent: $1,051
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 50.4%

- 2000 median household income: $45,758
- 2017 median household income: $58,041
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 26.8%

Nevada’s rent increase has outpaced income increase almost twofold. Much of the rent hikes have been tied to the fact that Nevada has a demand for apartments that outpaces its supply. Nevada currently has no rent control laws, so landlords have no cap on rent increases. Even though landlords are required to give residents notice of any price hikes 45 days before the end of a lease, no-cause evictions are permissible.

4/
Canva

#49. Wisconsin

- 2000 median rent: $540
- 2017 median rent: $819
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 51.7%

- 2000 median household income: $45,088
- 2017 median household income: $63,482
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 40.8%

In Wisconsin, increases in rent have exceeded increases in household income. Wisconsin rent is largely increasing because a construction labor shortage combined with expensive construction costs and land regulations have made rent increase rapidly.

5/
Yahala // Wikimedia Commons

#48. Indiana

- 2000 median rent: $521
- 2017 median rent: $793
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 52.2%

- 2000 median household income: $40,865
- 2017 median household income: $58,767
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 43.8%

In Indiana, rent has grown moderately higher than household incomes. One big factor for Indiana price hikes is the presence of large educational institutions full of students with a high demand for rental units. Because a good number of these students are from out of state and used to higher rents, landlords are able to price up. Many of the newer units being built skew toward being higher end for middle- and upper-income residents, which is also raising the cost of housing.

6/
Canva

#47. Michigan

- 2000 median rent: $546
- 2017 median rent: $835
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 52.9%

- 2000 median household income: $45,512
- 2017 median household income: $56,405
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 23.9%

Michigan’s median rent has increased at over double the pace of wages. One major factor accounting for rental growth is the higher cost of construction and construction labor shortages leading to higher costs of home-owning—which pushes a greater part of the population to seek more affordable rentals. The stagnancy of wages for lower-income Michigan residents who cannot afford homes—particularly those in urban areas like Detroit—coupled with an increase in millennial citizens who tend to prefer renting is also making the market for rental especially tight and expensive. Michigan has also seen slow economic growth over the years, with a minimum wage of just $9.45 an hour, which has meant many low-income residents are facing a serious housing-affordability crunch.

7/
Canva

#46. Georgia

- 2000 median rent: $613
- 2017 median rent: $958
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 56.3%

- 2000 median household income: $41,901
- 2017 median household income: $57,985
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 38.4%

In Georgia, housing rental costs are growing much faster than than that of household incomes. Georgia’s capital city, Atlanta, is experiencing a real-estate bubble that has made owning a home unaffordable for many individuals who have now turned to long-term renting as an alternative.

8/
Canva

#45. Arkansas

- 2000 median rent: $453
- 2017 median rent: $711
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 57.0%

- 2000 median household income: $29,697
- 2017 median household income: $49,751
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 67.5%

Arkansas is one of the two states on this list where the rent increases have been lower than the household income increases. A big factor for the rent increase is the decrease in homeownership, particularly with millennials. More and more individuals who can not afford to buy a home are turning to rental units, which is driving demand much higher than Arkansas’ current rental capacity, causing tight competition that leads to inflated prices. Arkansas has lax regulations for housing and is the only state that does not have minimum standards for rental spaces.

9/
brandon walker // Wikipedia

#44. North Carolina

- 2000 median rent: $548
- 2017 median rent: $861
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 57.1%

- 2000 median household income: $38,317
- 2017 median household income: $49,547
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 29.3%

In North Carolina, rents have increased at nearly double the rate of incomes. North Carolina has become a hub for education and economic development, and there are thousands of jobs added to the state each year. This increased migration to North Carolina has led to high demand and subsequently high rental costs in the region. While more jobs are created, the wages haven’t seen much growth for those on the lower end of the income spectrum, so for many North Carolinans, increased rent is burdensome.

10/
GoodFreePhotos

#43. Idaho

- 2000 median rent: $515
- 2017 median rent: $822
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 59.6%

- 2000 median household income: $37,611
- 2017 median household income: $59,497
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 58.2%

Idaho has seen housing rates rise at a relatively similar pace to income growth. Due to expensive development and construction costs in the area, many new developments are geared to residents on the higher end of the income spectrum. There is a dearth of cheap and affordable housing options, which has intensified the higher costs of renting. Idaho has loose regulations with landlords able to give as little as 15 days of notice before rent hikes at the end of a lease.

11/
Unsplash

#42. Illinois

- 2000 median rent: $605
- 2017 median rent: $974
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 61.0%

- 2000 median household income: $46,064
- 2017 median household income: $65,969
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 43.2%

In Illinois, rent has grown at a much higher pace than income. There are a shortage of rental units, particularly affordable rental units that have driven up the average cost of rentals and housing throughout Illinois. Many new developments are higher-end and geared toward young professionals, even though many families of lower incomes are looking for rentals as well.

12/
Pixabay

#41. New Mexico

- 2000 median rent: $503
- 2017 median rent: $813
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 61.6%

- 2000 median household income: $35,093
- 2017 median household income: $45,601
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 29.9%

New Mexico’s rent prices have grown at more than double the rate of incomes. Unlike many other states, New Mexico has had a slow economic growth since the turn of the century. Wages have moved little, despite the inflated costs of housing in the region. New Mexico has few housing regulations, although landlords must give residents 30 days’ notice before any rent hikes.

13/
GoodFreePhotos

#40. Iowa

- 2000 median rent: $470
- 2017 median rent: $760
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 61.7%

- 2000 median household income: $40,991
- 2017 median household income: $63,467
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 54.8%

In Iowa, rent has grown at a moderately faster pace than income. In Des Moines, for example, high rental prices stem from the lack of affordable housing in the state. Urban areas in Iowa are being underdeveloped with few housing options popping up, and they are attracting new citizens at an extremely high demand, which pushes up the rental costs. Iowa currently has no rent control.

14/
Phillip Capper // Flickr

#39. Maine

- 2000 median rent: $497
- 2017 median rent: $806
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 62.2%

- 2000 median household income: $37,266
- 2017 median household income: $53,316
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 43.1%

Maine rent has increased moderately more than incomes. Maine’s rental costs are impacted by the fact that more individuals are moving to Maine. Some of these individuals who come from states with higher wages and costs of living can outbid and pay top dollar for rentals, which has also increased rental costs. In Maine, landlords are required to give a minimum of 45 days of notice before rent can be increased.

15/
EEJCC // Wikimedia Commons

#38. Kentucky

- 2000 median rent: $445
- 2017 median rent: $724
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 62.7%

- 2000 median household income: $36,265
- 2017 median household income: $49,672
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 37%

In Kentucky, rent growth has outpaced income growth by about 75%. Kentucky’s growing urbanization and lack of creation of sustainable affordable housing have compounded to intensify rising costs of rental units. In Kentucky a landlord is regulated to give at least 30 days’ notice.

16/
Ron Reiring // Wikimedia Commons

#37. Nebraska

- 2000 median rent: $491
- 2017 median rent: $801
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 63.1%

- 2000 median household income: $41,750
- 2017 median household income: $59,583
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 42.7%

Rent in Nebraska is growing at a moderately faster pace than incomes. Much of the rent hikes are due to the tight housing market. Like many other areas across America, Nebraksa is seeing an increase in rental demande because homeownership is becoming a rarer possibility for individuals in the bottom half of the income spectrum. The supply of adequate housing has also been affected by a shortage of construction labor and high cost of building materials often imported from urban areas into more suburban and rural places. Nebraska has also had a relatively slow overall recent economic growth.

17/
GoodFreePhotos

#36. Kansas

- 2000 median rent: $498
- 2017 median rent: $815
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 63.7%

- 2000 median household income: $41,059
- 2017 median household income: $56,900
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 38.6%

In Kansas, the cost of rent has exceeded the cost of living by roughly 1.7 times the amount. While the rates of housing have steadily increased, wages have not. Kansas’ minimum wage salary is still $7.25, and economic growth in wages have been stagnant for individuals on the lower end of the socioeconomic spectrum.

18/
Pixabay

#35. Arizona

- 2000 median rent: $619
- 2017 median rent: $1,020
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 64.8%

- 2000 median household income: $39,783
- 2017 median household income: $59,700
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 50.1%

In Arizona, housing costs have exceeded income growth. Arizona’s housing-cost increase is in large part due to the high cost of building housing. Without many government subsidies or incentives, most developers are creating high-end housing.

19/
Unsplash

#34. Tennessee

- 2000 median rent: $505
- 2017 median rent: $833
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 65%

- 2000 median household income: $34,096
- 2017 median household income: $55,306
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 62.2%

In Tennessee, the growth in rent has been relatively equal to the growth in household incomes. The rent hikes can be attributed to the fact that there is a large increase in the number of rental units being created each year to counterbalance the influx of new residents into Tennessee.

20/
Brad.K // Flickr

#33. Utah

- 2000 median rent: $597
- 2017 median rent: $986
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 65.2%

- 2000 median household income: $47,550
- 2017 median household income: $69,789
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 46.8%

In Utah, rent prices have increased at a higher rate than wages. Utah’s escalating rent prices can be traced to the area’s rapid population growth over the years, which has increased the number of people seeking to rent. Utah also has struggled to build units to meet demands because of the high cost of construction coupled with construction labor shortages. Utah also is replete with natural resources and federal lands that limit the areas where new housing can be built.

21/
Ragesoss // Wikimedia Commons

#32. Connecticut

- 2000 median rent: $681
- 2017 median rent: $1,125
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 65.2%

- 2000 median household income: $50,172
- 2017 median household income: $74,304
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 48.1%

In Connecticut, wages have not increased at the same rate as housing costs. The demand for rentals in the state has increased, particularly in areas like Stamford due to its proximity to New York and ample educational institutions. Many of the new developments are higher end and targeting upper-income residents, which has driven up the costs of rent in the area. While wages have grown in Connecticut, the growth has been predominantly for middle- and upper-income residents.

22/
Stuart Seeger // Flickr

#31. Missouri

- 2000 median rent: $484
- 2017 median rent: $800
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 65.3%

- 2000 median household income: $45,097
- 2017 median household income: $56,530
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 25.4%

Rental rates in Missouri have grown at more than double the rate at which wages have grown. Missouri has suffered from economic stagnancy over the years, and its minimum wage is still $8.60 an hour. Missouri’s inability to raise wages to keep up with rising costs of housing has created an affordability issue for many low- and middle-income residents of Missouri.

23/
Unsplash

#30. Minnesota

- 2000 median rent: $566
- 2017 median rent: $939
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 65.9%

- 2000 median household income: $54,251
- 2017 median household income: $69,975
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 29%

Minnesota has recently seen the demand for renting units increase substantially as more millennials who cannot afford to buy homes turn to long-term renting as an alternative. Another factor affecting rent is that developers in the Minneapolis area are seeking to build high-end and luxury units that can bring them the most profit, which has rapidly increased housing costs.

24/
Canva

#29. New Hampshire

- 2000 median rent: $646
- 2017 median rent: $1,072
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 65.9%

- 2000 median household income: $50,926
- 2017 median household income: $75,630
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 48.5%

New Hampshire has had a rent increase at a higher rate than incomes. Much of the economic growth has been in lower- and middle-paying jobs. While the population has been relatively steady, the proportion of individuals looking for rental units versus buying homes has grown rapidly. Another factor compounding the lack of rental units is the construction labor shortage in the state that makes building new units a slower task than in many other states.

25/
Canva

#28. South Carolina

- 2000 median rent: $510
- 2017 median rent: $848
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 66.3%

- 2000 median household income: $37,570
- 2017 median household income: $54,537
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 45.2%

South Carolina’s rental values have outpaced wages in the area. A large factor is the boom of people moving into the area. A rapid increase in the population outweighs the current supply of housing. The lack of funding for affordable and subsidized housing is also driving a high median rent average. South Carolina also has to deal with construction limitations, particularly in areas where residents do not want an influx of new developments.

26/
Canva

#27. Alaska

- 2000 median rent: $720
- 2017 median rent: $1,201
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 66.8%

- 2000 median household income: $52,847
- 2017 median household income: $77,987
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 47.6%

In Alaska, rents have outpaced wage growth. The housing costs in Alaska have skyrocketed in large part due to the slow construction and creation of rental units in the area. Other factors such as the high energy costs needed in maintaining buildings have also compounded to create relatively expensive housing for Alaskans. Like many other states, Alaska’s main rent regulation is 30 days’ notice for rent to be increased.

27/
Canva

#26. Alabama

- 2000 median rent: $447
- 2017 median rent: $750
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 67.8%

- 2000 median household income: $35,424
- 2017 median household income: $50,865
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 43.6%

In Alabama, rent has grown at a higher rate than incomes. Over the past few years, Alabama has seen an influx of people into the state for educational and economic opportunities which have created a larger demand for rental properties. While economic opportunities have increased, salaries have remained relatively stagnant for lower-income individuals in particular. The increased demand has led to higher rental costs and less development of affordable or subsidized housing options.

28/
thejaan // Flickr

#25. Pennsylvania

- 2000 median rent: $531
- 2017 median rent: $893
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 68.2%

- 2000 median household income: $42,176
- 2017 median household income: $61,285
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 45.3%

Pennsylvania is a state where the increase in rent has superseded the increase in wages and salaries. The rising amount of people looking for rentals in lieu of homeownership has helped to drive up demand and costs for rent in the state. In Pennsylvania, landlords can only increase rent at the end of the lease with a 60-day notice.

29/
NatalieMaynor // Flickr

#24. Mississippi

- 2000 median rent: $439
- 2017 median rent: $742
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 69.0%

- 2000 median household income: $34,299
- 2017 median household income: $43,281
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 26.2%

Mississippi rental costs have grown at over two times the rate of wages. The state has had slow economic growth, lagging behind the majority of other states. Mississippi has relaxed regulations and landlords only need two weeks’ notice to increase rent.

30/
tochichi // Wikimedia Commons

#23. South Dakota

- 2000 median rent: $426
- 2017 median rent: $722
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 69.5%

- 2000 median household income: $36,475
- 2017 median household income: $56,914
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 56%

The rent in South Dakota has moderately outpaced income growth in the region. In Rapid City, the increase of younger individuals looking for apartments coupled with the increase of retirees looking to downsize into rental units are two factors pushing the high rents. South Dakota has relaxed income regulations, with landlords only needing 30 days’ notice to raise rent for individual leases.

31/
Prizrak // Wikimedia Commons

#22. Montana

- 2000 median rent: $447
- 2017 median rent: $759
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 69.8%

- 2000 median household income: $32,777
- 2017 median household income: $57,407
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 75.1%

Rental costs in Montana have grown at a slightly slower pace than income levels. The main reason for rental increases is demand. Montana’s mountainous geography and large swaths of federal land means there is a limit to land development for housing. Montana also has building regulations that make it costlier to develop housing which in turn means housing costs more. The state’s population has risen with out-of-state people who are used to higher wages and can afford to bid more for rentals than the locals.

32/
GPA Photo Archive // Flickr

#21. Delaware

- 2000 median rent: $639
- 2017 median rent: $1,086
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 70%

- 2000 median household income: $50,365
- 2017 median household income: $64,961
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 29%

In Delaware rent has grown at nearly 2.5 times the rate of income. The low increase in Delaware’s median household income can be tied to the stagnant wage growth. The stagnant economy has led to a labor shortage, which has negatively affected the construction industry, thus affecting the number of new rental units being built.

33/
Canva

#20. Rhode Island

- 2000 median rent: $553
- 2017 median rent: $941
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 70.2%

- 2000 median household income: $42,197
- 2017 median household income: $65,401
- 2000–017 median household income growth: 55.0%

Rhode Island rent has outpaced its wages and income growth. A large reason for the increased rent is that more people are turning from or delaying homeownership. This means a significant amount of people are looking for apartments—especially from middle and higher incomes, which rapidly drives up the price of the limited rental units in the area.

34/
Canva

#19. New Jersey

- 2000 median rent: $751
- 2017 median rent: $1,284
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 71%

- 2000 median household income: $50,405
- 2017 median household income: $71,240
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 41.3%

New Jersey has seen rent prices spike much more than household incomes. The factors are largely due to the overwhelming demand from renters. Those from New York and Pennsylvania represent an additional pool of people looking for New Jersey apartments. The state has also scaled back affordable housing incentives, which has also helped drive up rental prices.

35/
Canva

#18. Oklahoma

- 2000 median rent: $456
- 2017 median rent: $780
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 71.1%

- 2000 median household income: $32,432
- 2017 median household income: $51,882
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 60.0%

In Oklahoma, rents have grown at a moderately higher rate than incomes. A big factor accounting for the increase in rent in Oklahoma City is that the majority of new developers are creating high-end and luxury rental units. Oklahoma has lax housing regulations, and tenants have no state-defined notice for increase of rent.

36/
Canva

#17. Vermont

- 2000 median rent: $553
- 2017 median rent: $950
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 71.8%

- 2000 median household income: $39,594
- 2017 median household income: $63,682
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 60.8%

In Vermont, rents have grown at a moderately higher pace than incomes. Vermont’s expensive cost of developing housing has led to higher-cost rental units throughout the region. Vermont’s wage stagnancy for lower-income residents has prevented them from attaining the same economic growth as middle- and high-income peers, also compounding the burden of higher-cost rentals.

37/
Unsplash

#16. Texas

- 2000 median rent: $574
- 2017 median rent: $987
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 72%

- 2000 median household income: $38,609
- 2017 median household income: $60,092
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 55.6%

In Texas, rental costs have grown at a rate that outpaces the growth of incomes. One major cause for Texas’ increased renting costs is the mass influx of new residents, particularly those coming for higher-income jobs that have spurred the development of more expensive housing. Zoning regulations and a lack of state funding has limited affordable units for low-income individuals.

38/
Canva

#15. West Virginia

- 2000 median rent: $401
- 2017 median rent: $690
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 72.1%

- 2000 median household income: $29,411
- 2017 median household income: $46,957
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 59.7%

West Virginia’s growth in rents has outpaced its growth in median household income. One big factor for West Virginia’s growing rental costs is the surplus of workers who come into the state for temporary work, which has increased the demand for the limited supply of rentals and driven up the cost. West Virginia has no law regarding notice for rent increases.

39/
Canva

#14. Oregon

- 2000 median rent: $620
- 2017 median rent: $1,079
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 74.0%

- 2000 median household income: $42,499
- 2017 median household income: $62,498
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 47.1%

Oregon rent has grown at almost twice the pace of income. One unique factor affecting housing costs is anti-sprawl legislation. Even though Oregon has a lot of land, there are limits to where developments like urban rental units can be built in the state, which leads to a limited supply that drives up rent costs. Oregon has a statewide rent control law that prohibits the rent from increasing by more than 7% each year.

40/
Canva

#13. Florida

- 2000 median rent: $641
- 2017 median rent: $1,128
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 76.0%

- 2000 median household income: $38,856
- 2017 median household income: $53,086
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 36.6%

In Florida, rent has increased at twice the rate of income. Florida has high housing demand as it is popular, particularly for retirees, and many are willing to pay top dollar for the few available spots. Florida’s land-use regulations and permitting delays limit how much—and how fast—new housing can be built, which further intensifies the low supply. Florida has no rent control laws, and landlords can increase rent with as little as 15 days’ notice.

41/
GPA Photo Archive // Flickr

#12. Massachusetts

- 2000 median rent: $684
- 2017 median rent: $1,208
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 76.6%

- 2000 median household income: $46,753
- 2017 median household income: $76,243
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 63.1%

In Massachusetts, rent has increased at a higher rate than income. The state is home to education and economic power hubs, meaning an influx of individuals into the state wihtout enough units. The ever-present demand drives up rental costs. In Massachusetts, rent can only be increased after a lease is up.

42/
Canva

#11. Louisiana

- 2000 median rent: $466
- 2017 median rent: $836
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 79.4%

- 2000 median household income: $30,718
- 2017 median household income: $43,565
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 41.8%

In Louisiana, rent has increased at almost double the rate of incomes because of the lack of sufficient supply of housing units to meet the demand. In areas like New Orleans, the post-Katrina rebuilding of housing has not kept pace with housing needs. Louisiana has no rent control regulations.

43/
Ken Lund // Flickr

#10. Virginia

- 2000 median rent: $650
- 2017 median rent: $1,179
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 81.4%

- 2000 median household income: $47,163
- 2017 median household income: $70,811
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 50.1%

In Virginia, rent has grown much faster than incomes, and its proximity to D.C. has led to many job seekers eyeing residence there. The impending arrival of Amazon HQ2 to Crystal City is also playing a role in skyrocketing rent. Virginia has no regulations on capping rent increases; however, landlords are required to give 30 days of notice before increasing rent.

44/
Canva

#9. New York

- 2000 median rent: $672
- 2017 median rent: $1,226
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 82.4%

- 2000 median household income: $40,744
- 2017 median household income: $61,543
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 51%

New York’s rent has greatly outpaced the growth of income. It has always been home to some of the most expensive housing in the world. Due to its location as one of the nation’s foremost economic and educational epicenters, coupled with its limited available housing, New York’s apartments have a demand that surpasses supply. New York is one of the few states to have official rent stabilization laws. In New York City, landlords can only raise the rent of an apartment by a certain percentage each year.

45/
Unsplash

#8. Washington

- 2000 median rent: $663
- 2017 median rent: $1,216
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 83.4%

- 2000 median household income: $42,525
- 2017 median household income: $71,540
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 68.2%

In Washington, an increase in rent has exceeded the increase in median household incomes. The state is home to tech giants such as Amazon and Microsoft, and the relatively large number of high-income earners has helped to raise rents. Some areas of Washington have a vacancy rate—the number of unoccupied apartments—hovering between 1–2%, which can drive up demand and prices. Washington has some housing regulations, such as requiring 60 days’ notice before rent can be increased.

46/
Zenhaus // Wikimedia Commons

#7. Colorado

- 2000 median rent: $671
- 2017 median rent: $1,240
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 84.8%

- 2000 median household income: $48,240
- 2017 median household income: $74,984
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 55.4%

In Colorado, rent has grown at a significantly higher rate than household incomes. Its high rents are due to a rapid increase in population compounded by a shortage of available renting options. A shortage of construction workers in the state coupled with a lack of state interventions to create affordable housing has affected the high prices of rentals. Colorado renters are required to get a minimum 10 days of notice before any rent hikes.

47/
Mlewis2005 // Wikimedia Commons

#6. Wyoming

- 2000 median rent: $437
- 2017 median rent: $832
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 90.4%

- 2000 median household income: $39,629
- 2017 median household income: $59,536
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 50.2%

In Wyoming, rents have grown at nearly double the rate of incomes. While the economy has grown, the minimum wage has remained at $7.25, which makes rent increases especially difficult for low-income residents. Due to its unique geography full of valuable natural resources, Wyoming has a cap on where development can occur, limiting the ability to create new housing. Wyoming has also seen an influx of residents from higher-earning states with the ability to pay higher rents than the norm.

48/
formulanone // Wikimedia Commons

#5. North Dakota

- 2000 median rent: $412
- 2017 median rent: $785
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 90.5%

- 2000 median household income: $35,996
- 2017 median household income: $60,167
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 67.1%

North Dakota rent has grown at a significantly faster rate than wages. A boom in oil production in the 2000s had attracted an explosion of workers, which drove up demand for short-supply rental units, in turn driving up rental costs. North Dakota’s expensive construction costs also account for the lack of supply.

49/
Unsplash

#4. California

- 2000 median rent: $747
- 2017 median rent: $1,447
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 93.7%

- 2000 median household income: $46,816
- 2017 median household income: $70,038
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 49.6%

In California, wages have grown at nearly half the rate of rent. California is the most populous state in America and one of the most desirable places to live, so it faces continued population growth. The influx exceeds the state’s ability to create new housing, which in turn has caused extremely high rent across the state. Los Angeles and San Francisco are two cities well known for high costs of renting. California is one of the few states with rent control laws. Californian landlords cannot increase the rent by more than 5% in addition to the consumer price index percentage each year for tenants.

50/
Canva

#3. Maryland

- 2000 median rent: $689
- 2017 median rent: $1,337
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 94%

- 2000 median household income: $54,535
- 2017 median household income: $82,093
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 50.5%

Maryland’s rent costs have increased at nearly double the rate of incomes. Maryland’s proximity to D.C.—and its inclusion of some of the nation’s highest-earning counties—has created high-cost housing. The lack of sufficient affordable housing incentives for developers also means the newest housing is on the higher end of cost, which also raises the median rental costs. Maryland has no statewide rent control; however, cities such as Takoma Park and College Park have rent stabilization laws.

51/
Canva

#2. Hawaii

- 2000 median rent: $779
- 2017 median rent: $1,573
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 101.9%

- 2000 median household income: $51,546
- 2017 median household income: $73,599
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 42.8%

Rent in Hawaii has grown at more than double the rate of wages. A major reason for high rental costs is the demand outweighing the supply. Many people want to move to Hawaii, and the influx of retirees or those seeking vacation housing in the area has greatly increased demand. Because of Hawaii’s mountainous-island geography, there’s a hard limit on how much property can be developed. Supply is relatively fixed while rents remain extremely high.

52/
Canva

#1. District of Columbia

- 2000 median rent: $618
- 2017 median rent: $1,499
- 2000–2017 median rent growth: 142.6%

- 2000 median household income: $41,222
- 2017 median household income: $81,282
- 2000–2017 median household income growth: 97.2%

In D.C., rent prices have grown much faster than incomes. D.C. rental prices are spiking because job growth in the region has become explosive. The intense increase of D.C. residents has created a tight and competitive market that allows for higher prices to prevail. In D.C., certain building units are eligible for rent control and rent stabilization laws that put a cap of CPI-W (the percentage increase in the urban wage consumer price index) plus 2% for annual rent increases.

You may also like: Best affordable place to live in every state

2018 All rights reserved.