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Counties with the fastest-falling population in every state

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Pasteur // Wikimedia Commons

Counties with the fastest-falling population in every state

For decades, America has seen a decline in native-born births. Current population projections aren’t enough to compensate for the accelerated mortality curve that will occur with the passing of the Baby Boomers. In many communities throughout the United States, the number of deaths exceeds the number of births as the large Baby Boomer generation has moved past childbearing age and is coming into old age. The U.S. Census Bureau estimates that by 2035, the nation, like many other countries, will have more senior citizens than kids.

Foreign births have substituted for native-born births deficiencies for many years now with immigration helping to counter those statistics. But recent crackdowns on immigration and longer lifespans mean that for many communities, there will soon not be enough residents of childbearing age to replenish the workforce. These areas in the U.S. report either a stalled population growth rate or shrinking population and an overall increase in the average age of their residents. This leads to a reduced workforce which in turn drives down tax revenues that reduce local and state governments’ abilities to reinvest in communities and encourage migration. These factors further reduce the workforce.

Vulnerable communities—primarily in the Northeast and the Midwest—will face steep population declines unless corrective action can be taken.

To better understand this, Stacker looked at data from the U.S. Census’ American Community Survey for 2013 and 2017. Compiling the worst rates of population growth for the 50 states, we have prepared a list of the counties with the fasting-falling populations. For this list, we considered counties and county-equivalents. For each state, we will present the county with the worst percentage of growth from 2013 to 2017. We ordered the list alphabetically by state name.

As times change, a community’s appeal can change, too. While it can be the closing of an industry that drives workers away, other factors can make an area less attractive, as well. For example, a community that relies heavily on a single employer, like a military base, will offer few high paying private-sector jobs for those that have the education and experience. If an area is not drawing high-income workers, it may not have amenities that would be expected in more developed areas, like gyms, coffee shops, parks, quality schools, and conveniently placed stores. These factors may make the choice between staying local and moving to a bigger market a painful but necessary choice.

Keep reading to see how your state’s population stacks up against the rest of the nation.

You may also like:Most rural counties in America

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Carol M. Highsmith // Wikimedia Commons

Alabama: Walker County

- Total population in 2013: 65,998
--- Racial and ethnic breakdowns not available for this year
- Total population in 2017: 64,058 (Five-year percent change: -2.94%)
--- White: 88.9%; Black or African American: 5.9%; Hispanic or Latino: 2.6%; Asian: 0.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.9%
- Median age in 2017: 43.2 (up 1.6 years since 2013)

Walker County is a northwestern suburb county of Birmingham. The county seat is Jasper, which was once the world’s leading producer of coal. The collapse of the American coal industry has reversed the consistent trend of population growth the county has experienced since its founding.

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Jack Connaher // Wikimedia Commons

Alaska: Anchorage Municipality

- Total population in 2013: 300,950
--- White: 60.4%; Black or African American: 5.8%; Hispanic or Latino: 8.6%; Asian: 8.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 7.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 2.3%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 7.6%
- Total population in 2017: 294,356 (Five-year percent change: -2.19%)
--- White: 57.6%; Black or African American: 4.8%; Hispanic or Latino: 9.2%; Asian: 10.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 6.8%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 2.6%; Some other race: 0.3%; Two or more races: 8%
- Median age in 2017: 34 (up 1.6 years since 2013)

Like the largest growing counties, there are trends in the counties whose populations have shrunk the most. These are counties that are the population center of their states, have industrial or commercial bases that significantly shrunk in recent decades, or counties whose economy depends on a single factor – like a military installation. Anchorage Municipality, as the most populous borough in Alaska, fits this pattern. The city holds over 40% of the state’s population. With neighboring Matanuska-Susitna Borough the state’s fastest-growing county, Anchorage is amid a population transition to the suburbs.

 

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Clay Gilliland // Flickr

Arizona: Cochise County

- Total population in 2013: 129,473
--- White: 56.8%; Black or African American: 3.9%; Hispanic or Latino: 33.9%; Asian: 1.7%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.8%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.9%
- Total population in 2017: 124,756 (Five-year percent change: -3.64%)
--- White: 55%; Black or African American: 3.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 35.6%; Asian: 1.8%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 1.4%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.4%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 1.9%
- Median age in 2017: 41.6 (up 1.3 years since 2013)

Cochise County is Arizona’s southeastern-most county. Its county seat is Bisbee. A mining county, the county’s economy has been historically tied to its copper and gold extraction operations. Today, Cochise County is largely considered a picturesque tourist destination and exurb of Tucson.

 

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Roland Klose // Wikimedia Commons

Arkansas: Jefferson County

- Total population in 2013: 73,191
--- White: 40.5%; Black or African American: 56.8%; Hispanic or Latino: 1.8%; Asian: 0.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 0.6%
- Total population in 2017: 69,115 (Five-year percent change: -5.57%)
--- Racial and ethnic breakdowns not available for this year
- Median age in 2017: 38.8 (down 0.6 years since 2013)

Jefferson County is a centrally located county in Arkansas, on the Arkansas River. Its county seat is Pine Bluff. A suburb county to Little Rock, Jefferson County is largely agricultural, with limited manufacturing. Pine Bluff was named to USA Today’s 2018 list of America’s Poorest Cities as the seventh-poorest city in the nation.

 

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Stan Shebs // Wikimedia Commons

California: Napa County

- Total population in 2013: 140,326
--- White: 54.5%; Black or African American: 2.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 33.4%; Asian: 7.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.5%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.1%
- Total population in 2017: 140,973 (Five-year percent change: 0.46%)
--- White: 52.3%; Black or African American: 2.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 34.3%; Asian: 8%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.3%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 2.7%
- Median age in 2017: 41.4 (up 1.1 years since 2013)

Napa County is an interesting case. A largely agricultural region, the county has grown famous because of its wines, and as a result, Napa County has some of the most expensive and sought-after properties in the San Francisco Bay Area. Droughts, however, have affected Napa’s productivity. This, coupled with Napa’s high home costs, has made Napa County one of the few areas in the San Francisco area to see a population drop.

 

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Eleaf // Wikimedia Commons

Colorado: Mesa County

- Total population in 2013: 147,554
--- White: 82.0%; Black or African American: 0.9%; Hispanic or Latino: 13.8%; Asian: 0.5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.6%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.4%; Two or more races: 1.9%
- Total population in 2017: 151,616 (Five-year percent change: 2.75%)
--- White: 81.2%; Black or African American: 0.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 14.6%; Asian: 1.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.5%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.4%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 1.2%
- Median age in 2017: 39 (down 0.3 years since 2013)

Mesa County sits on Colorado’s western border with Utah. Its county seat is Grand Junction. Removed from Colorado’s eastern Front Range, the county is separated from the state’s population explosion by the Rocky Mountains. Grand Junction is the largest city in western Colorado. The draw of jobs and better opportunities in Denver, Boulder, and other Front Range cities, however, is causing a population bleed-off for communities in the state’s wings.

 

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Doug Kerr // Flickr

Connecticut: Litchfield County

- Total population in 2013: 186,924
--- White: 90.2%; Black or African American: 1.6%; Hispanic or Latino: 5.2%; Asian: 2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 1%
- Total population in 2017: 182,177 (Five-year percent change: -2.54%)
--- White: 88.2%; Black or African American: 2%; Hispanic or Latino: 6.3%; Asian: 1.9%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.3%; Two or more races: 1.1%
- Median age in 2017: 47.3 (up 1.6 years since 2013)

Litchfield County is Connecticut’s northeastern-most county, and the state’s largest county. As a non-administrative county division, there is no county seat. Like neighboring Berkshire County, Massachusetts’ fastest-shrinking county, Litchfield County has a largely older population that is dying off faster than it can be replaced. With many jobs being shuttled off to other locations, Litchfield can face the same fate Upstate New York, western Massachusetts, Vermont, and eastern New Hampshire are all enduring.

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Tim Kiser // Wikimedia Commons

Delaware: New Castle County

- Total population in 2013: 549,684
--- White: 59.9%; Black or African American: 23.5%; Hispanic or Latino: 9.2%; Asian: 4.9%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.3%; Two or more races: 2%
- Total population in 2017: 559,793 (Five-year percent change: 1.84%)
--- White: 57.2%; Black or African American: 24.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 10%; Asian: 5.8%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 2.2%
- Median age in 2017: 38.1 (up 0.8 years since 2013)

New Castle County is the northernmost of Delaware’s counties. It is the home of the state's largest city Wilmington and around 60% of the state’s population. Holding most of the state’s industry and commerce, the county—effectively, a suburb of Philadelphia—is the heart of the state. However, with the growth of Sussex County, New Castle County has seen some population migration.

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Cristo Vlahos // Wikimedia Commons

Florida: Monroe County

- Total population in 2013: 76,351
--- White: 69.0%; Black or African American: 5.3%; Hispanic or Latino: 21.7%; Asian: 1.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 2.4%
- Total population in 2017: 77,013 (Five-year percent change: 0.87%)
--- White: 66.1%; Black or African American: 6.5%; Hispanic or Latino: 24.5%; Asian: 1.5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 1%
- Median age in 2017: 47.1 (down 1.1 years since 2013)

Monroe County is the southernmost county in Florida. Comprising the Florida Keys and the Everglades, most of the county’s residents live on the islands dotting the tip of the state. This leads to a monolithic economy, where forestry makes up over half of the county’s jobs. The rise in hurricanes and a collapse in tourism have made this “paradise” less attractive for many people.

 

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PghPhxNfk // Wikimedia Commons

Georgia: Muscogee County

- Total population in 2013: 202,824
--- White: 42.3%; Black or African American: 44.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 7.3%; Asian: 2.1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.7%; Two or more races: 2.7%
- Total population in 2017: 194,058 (Five-year percent change: -4.32%)
--- White: 39.9%; Black or African American: 45.8%; Hispanic or Latino: 7.6%; Asian: 2.5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 3.9%
- Median age in 2017: 34.4 (up 1.0 years since 2013)

Muscogee County is a county on the Georgia-Alabama border. The county’s sole city is Columbus, whose government merged with the county government in 1971. Muscogee County is the host of U.S. Army installation Fort Benning, which takes up a quarter of the county’s physical space and is the area's largest employer.

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ErgoSum88 // Wikimedia Commons

Hawaii: Honolulu County

- Total population in 2013: 983,429
--- White: 19.6%; Black or African American: 2.6%; Hispanic or Latino: 9.2%; Asian: 41.7%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 8.4%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 18.3%
- Total population in 2017: 988,650 (Five-year percent change: 0.53%)
--- White: 18.2%; Black or African American: 2.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 9.9%; Asian: 42.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 8.9%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 18.5%
- Median age in 2017: 37.9 (up 0.9 years since 2013)

Honolulu County was formerly known as O’ahu County. Comprising the city of Honolulu, the island of O’ahu, and the northwestern Hawaiian Islands minus Midway Atoll, the county holds about 70% of the population. Only Nevada has a more lopsided city-state population share.

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Michlaovic // Wikimedia Commons

Idaho: Bannock County

- Total population in 2013: 83,249
--- White: 85.6%; Black or African American: 0.5%; Hispanic or Latino: 7.6%; Asian: 1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 2.6%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.6%
- Total population in 2017: 85,269 (Five-year percent change: 2.43%)
--- White: 83.8%; Black or African American: 0.5%; Hispanic or Latino: 8.7%; Asian: 1.8%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 2.1%
- Median age in 2017: 32.5 (down 0.7 years since 2013)

Bannock County is a southeastern county in Idaho. Its county seat is Pocatello. The county is partially contained in the Fort Hill Indian Reservation. While the county is host to high-tech firms like ON Semiconductor, the area lags behind other areas in the state in job growth. Bannock County has seen consistent population growth since 1985 but has failed to meet the population boom of the rest of the state.

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Gil Lebois // Wikimedia Commons

Illinois: Macon County

- Total population in 2013: 109,278
--- White: 77.3%; Black or African American: 13%; Hispanic or Latino: 2.1%; Asian: 1.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 6%
- Total population in 2017: 105,801 (Five-year percent change: -3.18%)
--- White: 76.3%; Black or African American: 14.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 2.3%; Asian: 1.0%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 5.4%
- Median age in 2017: 41.1 (up 1.4 years since 2013)

Macon County is a county in central Illinois. The county seat is Decatur. Heavily agricultural, Macon County hosts the North American headquarters of Archer Daniels Midland and major manufacturing plants for Caterpillar and Tate & Lyle’s. Macon County, however, has fallen victim to an aging population and to residents moving away at a faster rate.

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Derek Jensen // Wikimedia Commons

Indiana: Grant County

- Total population in 2013: 69,126
--- Racial and ethnic breakdowns not available for this year
- Total population in 2017: 66,491 (Five-year percent change: -3.81%)
--- White: 84.9%; Black or African American: 7.3%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.4%; Asian: 0.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 3.2%
- Median age in 2017: 41.1 (up 2.1 years since 2013)

Grant County is a central Indiana county. Its county seat is Marion. With the closing of the Thomas SA plant in Marion, the county fell into an economic downturn. While the area has attempted to make inroads towards rebuilding its infrastructure, many have escaped to the big city—namely, nearby Indianapolis.

 

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David Wilson // Wikimedia Commons

Iowa: Black Hawk County

- Total population in 2013: 132,546
--- White: 83.2%; Black or African American: 9.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.0%; Asian: 1.7%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.3%
- Total population in 2017: 132,648 (Five-year percent change: 0.08%)
--- White: 81.6%; Black or African American: 8.9%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.3%; Asian: 2.5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.4%
- Median age in 2017: 35.3 (up 0.7 years since 2013)

Black Hawk County is a county in northeastern Iowa. Its county seat is Waterloo. A former sundown community, Black Hawk County has struggled with racial equality, with Black residents of Waterloo experiencing extreme unemployment rates. HuffPost named the city one of the worst cities for black Americans in 2016. With the area subject to flooding from the Cedar River, the county has failed to find a way to attract new residents.

 

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Kzollma // Wikimedia Commons

Kansas: Riley County

- Total population in 2013: 75,394
--- White: 77.8%; Black or African American: 7.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 7.9%; Asian: 4.8%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.9%
- Total population in 2017: 74,172 (Five-year percent change: -1.62%)
--- White: 76.7%; Black or African American: 4.8%; Hispanic or Latino: 8.3%; Asian: 5.1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.6%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.4%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 4.1%
- Median age in 2017: 24.8 (up 0.1 years since 2013)

Riley County is a northeastern Kansas county. Its county seat is Manhattan. Home to U.S. Army installation Fort Riley and Kansas State University, the county has a limited industrial or commercial infrastructure. Besides the base and the university, the Kansas Department of Agriculture works largely out of Manhattan, and the county will be the site of the future National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility. Farm Bureau and the Steel & Pipe Supply Co. are among the few major private employers in the area.

 

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Brian Stansberry // Wikimedia Commons

Kentucky: Christian County

- Total population in 2013: 74,167
--- White: 67.2%; Black or African American: 19.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 7.3%; Asian: 1.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.4%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 4.4%
- Total population in 2017: 70,416 (Five-year percent change: -5.06%)
--- White: 65%; Black or African American: 21.9%; Hispanic or Latino: 7.8%; Asian: 1.9%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.2%; Some other race: 0.4%; Two or more races: 2.6%
- Median age in 2017: 27.8 (down 0.9 years since 2013)

Christian County is a southwestern county in Kentucky on the Tennessee border. Its county seat is Hopkinsville. While Christian County—as late as 2013—was one of the state’s fastest-growing counties, its heavy agricultural base and loss of jobs have turned the county around a full 180 degrees in just five years. The area’s population is also aging, with few new residents opting to live there.

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Shreveport-Bossier Convention and Tourist Bureau // Wikimedia Commons

Louisiana: Caddo Parish

- Total population in 2013: 254,887
--- White: 46.6%; Black or African American: 47.8%; Hispanic or Latino: 2.7%; Asian: 1.1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.5%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 1.1%
- Total population in 2017: 246,581 (Five-year percent change: -3.26%)
--- White: 44.8%; Black or African American: 47.6%; Hispanic or Latino: 2.9%; Asian: 1.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.4%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 2.8%
- Median age in 2017: 37.2 (up 0.6 years since 2013)

Caddo Parish is the northwestern-most parish in Louisiana. Its parish seat is Shreveport. The capital of the Ark-La-Tex three-state region, Shreveport is the home of major corporate operations of companies like Chase Bank, Regions Bank, Capital One, UPS, General Electric, and AT&T. While the county has more births than deaths, the area is in the midst of a bleed-out of residents to other areas.

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Pixabay

Maine: Aroostook County

- Total population in 2013: 70,055
--- White: 94.7%; Black or African American: 0.6%; Hispanic or Latino: 1.1%; Asian: 0.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 1.7%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.6%
- Total population in 2017: 67,653 (Five-year percent change: -3.43%)
--- White: 94.1%; Black or African American: 0.8%; Hispanic or Latino: 1.2%; Asian: 0.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 1.9%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.4%
- Median age in 2017: 47.3 (up 0.8 years since 2013)

Aroostook County is the northernmost county in Maine. The county is the largest county by landmass east of the Rocky Mountains. Part of the Maine North Woods, the county’s main industries are timber, potatoes, and wind power. Like much of New England and the Northeast, the average population age is increasing. Aroostook County had the oldest average resident in the state in 2018 at 45.3 years, compared to a state average of 44.9 years and a national average of 38.2 years.

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Bonnachoven // Wikimedia Commons

Maryland: Allegany County

- Total population in 2013: 73,521
--- White: 87.7%; Black or African American: 8.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 0.8%; Asian: 0.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.4%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.2%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.5%
- Total population in 2017: 71,615 (Five-year percent change: -2.59%)
--- White: 87.0%; Black or African American: 9.3%; Hispanic or Latino: 1.8%; Asian: 0.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.4%
- Median age in 2017: 41.5 (down 0.7 years since 2013)

Allegany County is a northwestern county in Maryland. Its county seat is Cumberland. Per the Census Bureau, Allegany is Maryland’s poorest county by median family income—despite the county having a higher median income of many states. As Maryland is a wealthy state, many residents have moved out, looking for better opportunities in the state and in the nearby Washington D.C. metro area.

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Protophobic // Wikimedia Commons

Massachusetts: Berkshire County

- Total population in 2013: 129,585
--- White: 89.8%; Black or African American: 2.6%; Hispanic or Latino: 3.8%; Asian: 1.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 2.2%
- Total population in 2017: 126,313 (Five-year percent change: -2.52%)
--- White: 87.3%; Black or African American: 2.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.6%; Asian: 1.7%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 1.3%; Two or more races: 2.4%
- Median age in 2017: 46.9 (up 1.3 years since 2013)

Largely a resort destination, Massachusetts’ westernmost county—commonly called the Berkshires for the Berkshires Hills—was known for decades for its picturesque villages, laid-back attitude, and high quality of life. However, like much of New England, Berkshire County’s residents are aging without a significant influx of births or transplanted residents to replace them. This is slowly forcing the economy into a decline.

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Andrew Jameson // Wikimedia Commons

Michigan: Bay County

- Total population in 2013: 106,832
--- White: 90.6%; Black or African American: 1.3%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.9%; Asian: 0.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 2.1%
- Total population in 2017: 104,239 (Five-year percent change: -2.43%)
--- White: 90.1%; Black or African American: 2.3%; Hispanic or Latino: 5.4%; Asian: 0.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.6%
- Median age in 2017: 44.2 (up 2.1 years since 2013)

Bay County is a county in the central region of the Michigan Lower Peninsula. On the shore of Saginaw Bay, the county’s seat is Bay City. Bay City is one of the few Michigan communities—along with Flint and Detroit—to lose population between 2016 and 2017. While Detroit and Flint can blame political influences for their declines, Bay City has been beset by a lack of investment in its job infrastructure and an aging populace.

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Joey1niner // Wikimedia Commons

Minnesota: St. Louis County

- Total population in 2013: 200,540
--- White: 91.7%; Black or African American: 1.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 1.4%; Asian: 1.1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 1.9%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 2.2%
- Total population in 2017: 200,000 (Five-year percent change: -0.27%)
--- White: 91.1%; Black or African American: 1.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 1.7%; Asian: 1.1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 1.7%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.7%
- Median age in 2017: 40.9 (down 0 years since 2013)

St. Louis County is a Canadian border county in Minnesota on the shore of Lake Superior. It’s the largest county east of the Rocky Mountains by total area, and it is larger than Delaware, Rhode Island, and the District of Columbia combined. Its county seat is Duluth. A blue-collar community, the county’s chief industries are pulpwood and tourism. The county has seen a spike in its homeless levels that exceeded other areas of the state, such as the Twin Cities. This may be because of a weaker job market in the Duluth area.

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Dudemanfellabra // Wikimedia Commons

Mississippi: Lauderdale County

- Total population in 2013: 80,254
--- Racial and ethnic breakdowns not available for this year
- Total population in 2017: 76,155 (Five-year percent change: -5.11%)
--- Racial and ethnic breakdowns not available for this year
- Median age in 2017: 38.0 (up 0.6 years since 2013)

Lauderdale County is a county on the Alabama state border. Its county seat is Meridian. Home to Naval Air Station Meridian and Air National Guard/Army National Guard installation Key Field, much of the county’s employees work for the military. A former rail community, the county has not developed a significant industrial infrastructure, although the county has emerged as a leader in the healthcare field.

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Daniel Schwen // Wikimedia Commons

Missouri: St. Louis city

- Total population in 2013: 318,416
--- White: 43.4%; Black or African American: 47.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 3.7%; Asian: 2.9%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 2%
- Total population in 2017: 308,626 (Five-year percent change: -3.07%)
--- White: 43.6%; Black or African American: 46.6%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.0%; Asian: 3.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.5%; Two or more races: 1.7%
- Median age in 2017: 35.6 (up 0.9 years since 2013)

St. Louis is Missouri’s second-largest city and biggest port on the Mississippi River. The 20th largest city in the United States, St. Louis has played host to the Olympics, World Fairs, and the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. Called the “Gateway to the West,” St. Louis has been key to this country’s growth. Many of the largest corporations in the United States—including Anheuser-Busch, Enterprise, Peabody Energy, Purina, and Monsanto—call St. Louis home. However, concerns about police brutality and institutionalized racism have given the city a black eye in recent years.

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Montanabw // Wikimedia Commons

Montana: Cascade County

- Total population in 2013: 82,384
--- White: 86.2%; Black or African American: 1.6%; Hispanic or Latino: 3.9%; Asian: 1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 4.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 3.2%
- Total population in 2017: 81,654 (Five-year percent change: -0.89%)
--- White: 84.6%; Black or African American: 1.3%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.5%; Asian: 0.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 4.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 4.5%
- Median age in 2017: 39.5 (up 2.1 years since 2013)

Cascade County is a central Montana county. Its county seat in Great Falls. Like many other shrinking counties, the county’s economy is driven by the military—in this case, Malmstrom Air Force Base.

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Tony Webster // Flickr

Nebraska: Douglas County

- Total population in 2013: 537,256
--- White: 71.2%; Black or African American: 10.8%; Hispanic or Latino: 11.7%; Asian: 2.9%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.4%; Two or more races: 2.7%
- Total population in 2017: 561,620 (Five-year percent change: 4.53%)
--- White: 69.5%; Black or African American: 10.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 12.7%; Asian: 3.8%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 2.8%
- Median age in 2017: 34.7 (up 0.7 years since 2013)

Douglas County is an eastern county on the state’s Iowa border. It is the home of Omaha, the state’s largest city. The county houses one-fourth of the state’s population within its borders. While Douglas County is the home of four Fortune 500 companies – Berkshire Hathaway, Kiewit Corporation, Mutual of Omaha, and Union Pacific – the area’s high percentage of aging residents is fueling the population loss.

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Kc0616 // Wikimedia Commons

Nevada: Washoe County

- Total population in 2013: 433,731
--- White: 64.7%; Black or African American: 2.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 23.3%; Asian: 5.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 1.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.5%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.9%
- Total population in 2017: 460,587 (Five-year percent change: 6.19%)
--- White: 62.6%; Black or African American: 2.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 24.6%; Asian: 5.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 1.4%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.6%; Some other race: 0.5%; Two or more races: 2.8%
- Median age in 2017: 38.4 (down 0 years since 2013)

Washoe County is Nevada’s northwestern-most county. Its county seat is Reno. Even though the area is experiencing a tech renaissance, the highly lopsided relationship between the population of Las Vegas’ Clark County and the rest of the state reflects an equally lopsided allocation of resources and investments. This has led many to look at other places to settle.

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Jon Platek // Wikimedia Commons

New Hampshire: Cheshire County

- Total population in 2013: 76,610
--- White: 94.6%; Black or African American: 0.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 1.7%; Asian: 1.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 1.3%
- Total population in 2017: 75,960 (Five-year percent change: -0.85%)
--- White: 94.3%; Black or African American: 1.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 1.9%; Asian: 1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.5%
- Median age in 2017: 42.8 (up 0.7 years since 2013)

Cheshire County is New Hampshire’s southwestern-most county. Its county seat is Keene. Bordering southern Vermont, Cheshire County has inherited some population declines of its neighbors. This is mainly because of weak population migration into the area.

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Tim Kiser // Wikimedia Commons

New Jersey: Salem County

- Total population in 2013: 65,166
--- White: 75.7%; Black or African American: 14.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 7.7%; Asian: 0.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 1.5%
- Total population in 2017: 62,792 (Five-year percent change: -3.64%)
--- White: 74.2%; Black or African American: 13.9%; Hispanic or Latino: 9.0%; Asian: 0.7%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.3%; Two or more races: 1.6%
- Median age in 2017: 42.1 (up 1.3 years since 2013)

New Jersey’s least populous county. Salem County occupies the state’s southwest corner on the Delaware River. Its county seat is Salem. Located south of Philadelphia and in the Wilmington, Del. metro area, the county has more in common with Delaware culturally than with New Jersey. The county’s officials have blamed the population loss on a lack of investment from the state.

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J Dykstra // Wikimedia Commons

New Mexico: Chaves County

- Total population in 2013: 65,823
--- White: 41.6%; Black or African American: 2.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 54.2%; Asian: 0.5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.2%
- Total population in 2017: 64,866 (Five-year percent change: -1.45%)
--- Racial and ethnic breakdowns not available for this year
- Median age in 2017: 34.6 (down 0.4 years since 2013)

Chaves County is a county in the southeastern corner of New Mexico. Its county seat is Roswell, which has been the center of the UFO-alien controversy community for decades, although the alleged crash occurred near Corona 75 miles away. The county is a petroleum producer. However, as the county is farther upfield from the state’s oil fields, its population growth has shrunk compared to its neighbors’.

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Jondude11 // Wikimedia Commons

New York: Jefferson County

- Total population in 2013: 119,504
--- White: 82.7%; Black or African American: 4.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 7.0%; Asian: 0.8%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.8%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 4.2%
- Total population in 2017: 114,187 (Five-year percent change: -4.45%)
--- White: 81.4%; Black or African American: 6.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 7.6%; Asian: 1.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.6%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.2%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 3%
- Median age in 2017: 32.4 (up 1 year since 2013)

Upstate New York has been a foil to New York City’s growth. Two of Upstate’s largest cities—Syracuse and Rochester—for example, both have poverty levels north of 30%. With power in Albany traditionally skewed toward New York City, Upstate—until recently—has failed to receive needed investments to recover from the collapse of its manufacturing core.

Jefferson County, a St. Lawrence River-bordering county west of the Adirondack Park, has been a victim to this political philosophy. The home of U.S. Army installation Fort Drum, the county is largely dependent on the federal government for local jobs.

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Tradewinds // Wikimedia Commons

North Carolina: Craven County

- Total population in 2013: 104,489
--- White: 66.7%; Black or African American: 21.3%; Hispanic or Latino: 6.9%; Asian: 2.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.7%
- Total population in 2017: 102,578 (Five-year percent change: -1.83%)
--- White: 65.6%; Black or African American: 22.6%; Hispanic or Latino: 7.2%; Asian: 3.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.3%
- Median age in 2017: 37.3 (up 1.2 years since 2013)

Craven County is a county on the Atlantic Seaboard in North Carolina. Its county seat is New Bern. Forbes reported in 2017, Craven County had zero job growth and a net migration of -120. A hot spot for retirees, the area is in danger of population collapse as its residents age.

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MINOT AIR FORCE BASE

North Dakota: Ward County

- Total population in 2013: 67,990
--- White: 85.9%; Black or African American: 2.8%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.8%; Asian: 1.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 2.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.3%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.8%
- Total population in 2017: 68,946 (Five-year percent change: 1.41%)
--- White: 82.8%; Black or African American: 4.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 6.3%; Asian: 1.7%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 2.5%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.5%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.1%
- Median age in 2017: 32.0 (down 0 years since 2013)

A northwestern county in North Dakota, Ward County sits on the Des Lacs River. The county seat is Minot. The county’s largest employer is the Minot Air Force Base.

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Jack Pearce // Wikimedia Commons

Ohio: Trumbull County

- Total population in 2013: 206,442
--- White: 87.6%; Black or African American: 8.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 1.6%; Asian: 0.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 1.3%
- Total population in 2017: 200,380 (Five-year percent change: -2.94%)
--- White: 87.0%; Black or African American: 8%; Hispanic or Latino: 1.8%; Asian: 0.5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 2.3%
- Median age in 2017: 44.8 (up 1.1 years since 2013)

Trumbull County is in the northeastern corner of Ohio. Its county seat is Warren. A neighboring county to Youngstown, the county has inherited the economy of a collapsed manufacturing base, much like most communities in the Rust Belt. The county’s top employers are hospitals, the Thomas Steel Strip, and Delphi Packard Electrical.

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Jud McCranie // Wikimedia Commons

Oklahoma: Comanche County

- Total population in 2013: 124,937
--- White: 57.7%; Black or African American: 16.3%; Hispanic or Latino: 12.5%; Asian: 1.8%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 5.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.6%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 5.8%
- Total population in 2017: 121,526 (Five-year percent change: -2.73%)
--- White: 55.9%; Black or African American: 14.8%; Hispanic or Latino: 13.1%; Asian: 2.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 3.9%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.5%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 9.3%
- Median age in 2017: 33.5 (up 2.1 years since 2013)

Comanche County is a county in the southwestern corner of Oklahoma. Its county seat is Lawton. More than half of the county’s gross domestic product comes from government services. The county is the home of U.S. Army installation Fort Sill and the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge.

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MIM1765 // Wikimedia Commons

Oregon: Umatilla County

- Total population in 2013: 76,720
--- White: 68.0%; Black or African American: 0.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 25.2%; Asian: 0.7%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 2.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 3.5%
- Total population in 2017: 76,985 (Five-year percent change: 0.35%)
--- White: 66.0%; Black or African American: 1.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 26.8%; Asian: 0.1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 3.9%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.3%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.7%
- Median age in 2017: 36.1 (up 0.2 years since 2013)

Umatilla County is a northeastern Oregon county on the Washington State border. The county seat is Pendleton, but the county’s largest city is Hermiston. The county’s largest industries are agriculture, agricultural processing, and retail. Umatilla County is growing; however, the lack of infrastructure has led to a slower rate of growth than other counties in the state.

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Greg Hume // Wikimedia Commons

Pennsylvania: Cambria County

- Total population in 2013: 140,499
--- White: 92.8%; Black or African American: 3.5%; Hispanic or Latino: 1.6%; Asian: 0.5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.5%
- Total population in 2017: 133,054 (Five-year percent change: -5.30%)
--- White: 92.7%; Black or African American: 3.5%; Hispanic or Latino: 1.6%; Asian: 0.7%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 1.2%
- Median age in 2017: 45.5 (up 1.1 years since 2013)

Cambria County is a county in southwest Pennsylvania. A traditional part of Pennsylvania’s steel country, the county’s economy has fallen into decline because of the collapse of the national manufacturing core. The county seat is Ebensburg.

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Pi.1415926535 // Wikimedia Commons

Rhode Island: Kent County

- Total population in 2013: 165,035
--- White: 90.3%; Black or African American: 1.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 4%; Asian: 2.9%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 1.2%
- Total population in 2017: 163,760 (Five-year percent change: -0.77%)
--- White: 88.5%; Black or African American: 1.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 5%; Asian: 3.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 1.9%
- Median age in 2017: 43.8 (up 0.1 years since 2013)

Kent County is Rhode Island’s middle county, sandwiched by Providence County to the north and Washington County to the south. The county’s largest city is Warwick. With much of Rhode Island’s population and industry in Providence County, Kent County’s population growth has been largely flat with a median age of 43.8 years.

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Akhenaton06 // Wikimedia Commons

South Carolina: Orangeburg County

- Total population in 2013: 90,942
--- White: 33.5%; Black or African American: 62.9%; Hispanic or Latino: 2.1%; Asian: 0.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 0.7%
- Total population in 2017: 87,476 (Five-year percent change: -3.81%)
--- White: 33.2%; Black or African American: 61.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 2.2%; Asian: 1.1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.7%
- Median age in 2017: 40.6 (up 2 years since 2013)

Orangeburg County is a county in South Carolina’s central Midlands region. Its county seat is Orangeburg. One of South Carolina’s largest agricultural producers, Orangeburg County has little in non-agricultural industry jobs to offer. On the plus side, the county hosts two Historically Black Colleges or Universities (HBCUs).

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Mr. Satterly // Wikimedia Commons

South Dakota: Pennington County

- Total population in 2013: 105,761
--- White: 80.4%; Black or African American: 1.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.6%; Asian: 0.9%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 8%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 4.7%
- Total population in 2017: 110,141 (Five-year percent change: 4.14%)
--- White: 79.9%; Black or African American: 1.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 5%; Asian: 1.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 8.6%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.4%; Some other race: 0.5%; Two or more races: 3.1%
- Median age in 2017: 37.4 (down 0 years since 2013)

Pennington County is a Wyoming-bordering South Dakota county. The county is the home of Rapid City, the state’s second-largest city and Mount Rushmore. The county is largely mountainous. Like much of the Prairies states, South Dakota’s population is on the rise, and so is Pennington County’s. The area, however, is not seeing the growth of other areas of the state, in part due to a lack of job infrastructure.

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sporst // Flickr

Tennessee: Madison County

- Total population in 2013: 98,733
--- White: 57.0%; Black or African American: 40.3%; Hispanic or Latino: 0.6%; Asian: 1.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 0.8%
- Total population in 2017: 97,643 (Five-year percent change: -1.10%)
--- Racial and ethnic breakdowns not available for this year
- Median age in 2017: 38.3 (up 0.7 years since 2013)

Madison County is a western Tennessee county. Its county seat is Jackson. A former rail community, the reduction of rail service through the county caused a bleed-off of jobs and residents. While new businesses have come in to fill the void, the one-time largest city in western Tennessee has yet to fully recover.

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Larry D. Moore // Wikimedia Commons

Texas: Coryell County

- Total population in 2013: 76,192
--- White: 60.1%; Black or African American: 15.6%; Hispanic or Latino: 17.2%; Asian: 1.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.6%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 4.8%
- Total population in 2017: 74,913 (Five-year percent change: -1.68%)
--- White: 58.5%; Black or African American: 13.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 18.3%; Asian: 2.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 1.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.8%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 5.1%
- Median age in 2017: 33.2 (up 2.0 years since 2013)

Coryell County is a central Texas county on the Edwards Plateau. The county seat is Gatesville. The county is a partial host to U.S. Army installation Fort Hood. Gatesville also hosts five of the eight incarceration facilities for women run by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, including the only death row in the state for women.

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Pasteur // Wikimedia Commons

Utah: Salt Lake County

- Total population in 2013: 1,079,721
--- White: 72.9%; Black or African American: 1.6%; Hispanic or Latino: 17.6%; Asian: 3.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.7%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 1.6%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 1.8%
- Total population in 2017: 1,135,649 (Five-year percent change: 5.18%)
--- White: 70.9%; Black or African American: 1.9%; Hispanic or Latino: 18.3%; Asian: 4.1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.8%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 1.4%; Some other race: 0.4%; Two or more races: 2.4%
- Median age in 2017: 32.9 (up 1.1 years since 2013)

Another example of the largest city in the state being the largest population loser, Salt Lake County is a northern Utah county that hosts the state’s largest city and capital, Salt Lake City. Salt Lake City sits on the Wasatch Front, which is the concentrated center of urban development for the state.

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Pixabay

Vermont: Bennington County

- Total population in 2013: 36.871
--- White: 96.3%; Black or African American: 0.5%; Hispanic or Latino: 1.5%; Asian: 0.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.3%; Two or more races: 2.4%
- Total population in 2017: 36,054 (Five-year percent change: -2.22%)
--- White: 96.2%; Black or African American: 1%; Hispanic or Latino: 1.8%; Asian: 0.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 2.1%
- Median age in 2017: 46.4 (up 1.0 years since 2013)

Bennington County is the southwestern-most county in Vermont. Next to Berkshire County, Mass., Bennington County shares the Berkshires’ lack of fresh blood. Bennington County has two shire towns or county seats: Bennington and Manchester.

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U.S. Navy // Wikimedia Commons

Virginia: Portsmouth city

- Total population in 2013: 96,205
--- White: 39.7%; Black or African American: 51.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 3.6%; Asian: 1.0%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.5%; Two or more races: 3.5%
- Total population in 2017: 94,572 (Five-year percent change: -1.70%)
--- White: 37.2%; Black or African American: 52.8%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.4%; Asian: 1.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.4%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 3.6%
- Median age in 2017: 36 (up 1 year since 2013)

Portsmouth is an independent city in Virginia, situated in Hampton Roads Harbor. The city’s largest employer is the Norfolk Naval Shipyard—the name reflects the former Norfolk County. The shipyard is one of the few facilities that can service an aircraft carrier in dry dock.

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Michael S. Shannon // Wikimedia Commons

Washington: Yakima County

- Total population in 2013: 247,044
--- White: 45.7%; Black or African American: 1%; Hispanic or Latino: 47%; Asian: 1.1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 3.5%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.7%
- Total population in 2017: 250,193 (Five-year percent change: 1.27%)
--- White: 43.1%; Black or African American: 0.6%; Hispanic or Latino: 49.4%; Asian: 0.8%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 3.8%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.1%
- Median age in 2017: 32.7 (down 0 years since 2013)

Yakima County is a county in southwestern Washington State. Its county seat is Yakima. The Yakima Indian Reservation makes up more than a third of the county’s area. Largely agricultural, the county is responsible for over three-quarters of the nation’s hops production.

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Tim Kiser // Wikimedia Commons

West Virginia: Raleigh County

- Total population in 2013: 78,833
--- Racial and ethnic breakdowns not available for this year
- Total population in 2017: 75,022 (Five-year percent change: -4.83%)
--- Racial and ethnic breakdowns not available for this year
- Median age in 2017: 42.7 (up 1.9 years since 2013)

Raleigh County is a county in southern West Virginia. A coal mining county, the area has been hit hard by the collapse of the coal industry in the country. The county seat is Beckley. Raleigh was one of the counties in West Virginia that recently announced the addition of new jobs.

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Jonathunder // Wikimedia Commons

Wisconsin: Manitowoc County

- Total population in 2013: 80,654
--- White: 91.8%; Black or African American: 0.8%; Hispanic or Latino: 3.5%; Asian: 2.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1%
- Total population in 2017: 79,175 (Five-year percent change: -1.83%)
--- White: 90.7%; Black or African American: 0.8%; Hispanic or Latino: 4%; Asian: 3.5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 0.8%
- Median age in 2017: 44.6 (down 0.2 years since 2013)

Manitowoc County is a Lake Michigan-facing county in eastern Wisconsin. The county seat is Manitowoc. The county has come to national attention due to the Netflix documentary “Making a Murderer,” which highlighted the trials of the convicted murderer Steven Avery and the questionable police misconduct surrounding the case. Manitowoc County is rural.

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Adbay // Wikimedia Commons

Wyoming: Natrona County

- Total population in 2013: 80,973
--- Racial and ethnic breakdowns not available for this year
- Total population in 2017: 79,547 (Five-year percent change: -1.76%)
--- Racial and ethnic breakdowns not available for this year
- Median age in 2017: 36.7 (up 0.9 years since 2013)

Natrona County is a central county in Wyoming. Its county seat is Casper, the second-largest city in the state. A banking hub for the state, the county has engaged in coal and uranium mining as a replacement for petroleum refinement, which has slowly been shut down in the county.

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