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Fastest-growing county in every state

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Fastest-growing county in every state

The United States’ population has hit a plateau. The nation for the year ending July 2018 saw its lowest level of population growth since 1937, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Declining births, increasing deaths—largely due to the graying Baby Boomer population—and a crackdown on immigration left almost one-fifth of all states showing absolute population losses.

While the Rocky Mountain states, Florida, and most of the Southeast have seen moderate to high levels of population growth, the Northeast, Midwest, Hawaii, Alaska, and California have seen no significant growth or negative growth. Projections show these states with little growth are likely to face larger elderly communities and a diminished work base.

Population shifts, however, are not typically limited to just a state. People move from community to community, with some emerging as more desirable than others. This may be because of a plethora of job opportunities, high quality of life, easy commutability to job centers, low rents, or any combination of these or other factors.

To better understand this, Stacker has created a slideshow of the fastest-growing counties in the United States, based on U.S. Census data from 2013 and 2017. For this list, we looked at counties and county equivalents, including parishes, boroughs, and independent cities, and ranked the counties by five-year percent change in population. This gallery is not sorted by percentage growth over the five-year period, but in alphabetical order by state.

A county typically sees population growth as a “bedroom community” (a municipality with an atypically large commuting population) to a large city. These communities are typically quieter than their feeder cities, offer lower rents and a higher quality of living, and are remote enough to be immune to the feeder city’s crime, traffic, and crowds. In the case of cities with major housing crushes, such as the San Jose-San Francisco metropolitan area, bedroom communities may be 100 miles away, if not farther. Typically, however, these counties are close enough to be considered suburbs or exurbs.

Keep reading to find out what quickly growing county was once home to Prince.

You may also like: Counties in every state with the fastest-growing income

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JodyB // Wikimedia Commons

Alabama: Baldwin County

- Total population in 2013: 195,540
--- White: 83.1%; Black or African American: 10.3%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.6%; Asian: 0.7%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.0%
- Total population in 2017: 212,628 (Five-year percent change: 8.74%)
--- White: 83.0%; Black or African American: 9.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.6%; Asian: 1.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 1.0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 0.8%
- Median age in 2017: 42.6 (up 1.7 years since 2013)

Baldwin County is Alabama’s largest county by area. Adjacent to Mobile County, Baldwin is bordered by the Florida Panhandle and the Gulf of Mexico. Baldwin County was once a mostly rural county but is now fifth in population size in Alabama. It recently garnered national attention for refusing to lower its flags following the 2016 Orlando nightclub shooting, despite being ordered to do so by the governor.

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Michael Boyter // Wikimedia Commons

Alaska: Matanuska-Susitna Borough

- Total population in 2013: 95,192
--- White: 80.9%; Black or African American: 1.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.5%; Asian: 1.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 4.6%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 7.3%
- Total population in 2017: 106,532 (Five-year percent change: 11.91%)
--- White: 79.2%; Black or African American: 1.3%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.9%; Asian: 1.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 6.0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 7.0%
- Median age in 2017: 35.2 (up 0.9 years since 2013)

Immediately north of Anchorage, the Matanuska-Susitna Borough is home to the city of Wasilla, which came into the national attention for being the home of one-time vice-presidential nominee Sarah Palin. It also has another political claim to fame: Of the counties carried by third-party presidential nominee Ross Perot in 1992, Matanuska-Susitna Borough was the largest in both area and population.

 

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Ammodramus // WIkimedia Commons

Arizona: Pinal County

- Total population in 2013: 389,350
--- White: 58.2%; Black or African American: 4.5%; Hispanic or Latino: 29%; Asian: 1.5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 4.5%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.4%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.0%
- Total population in 2017: 430,237 (Five-year percent change: 10.5%)
--- White: 56.7%; Black or African American: 3.9%; Hispanic or Latino: 30.1%; Asian: 1.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 3.8%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.2%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 3.6%
- Median age in 2017: 39.6 (up 2.1 years since 2013)

Pinal County is Arizona’s third-largest county. Between Phoenix and Tucson, the county has been the beneficiary of the two cities’ spreading growth. As such, Pinal County is largely a suburban development, with many of its towns and unincorporated areas serving as bedroom communities.

 

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Law7833 // WIkimedia Commons

Arkansas: Benton County

- Total population in 2013: 237,297
--- White: 75.1%; Black or African American: 1.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 16.0%; Asian: 3.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 1.4%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 2.2%
- Total population in 2017: 266,300 (Five-year percent change: 12.22%)
--- White: 73.3%; Black or African American: 2.0%; Hispanic or Latino: 16.7%; Asian: 3.9%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 1.7%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.6%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 1.7%
- Median age in 2017: 35.5 (up 0.4 years since 2013)

Benton County is Arkansas’ northwestern-most county. The county’s seat is Bentonville, Ark., the home of Walmart. One of the few counties in Arkansas to have lax alcohol rules, Bentonville is slowly growing more cosmopolitan, due in part to investments from the Walton family and to the growing number of high-profile jobs in the area. Besides Walmart, Daisy Outdoor Products and J. B. Hunt also have corporate headquarters in the county.

 

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Miles530 // Wikimedia Commons

California: Yolo County

- Total population in 2013: 204,593
--- White: 48.4%; Black or African American: 2%; Hispanic or Latino: 31.3%; Asian: 13.5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.4%; Two or more races: 4.0%
- Total population in 2017: 219,116 (Five-year percent change: 7.1%)
--- White: 46.5%; Black or African American: 2.5%; Hispanic or Latino: 31.8%; Asian: 13.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.5%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 5.2%
- Median age in 2017: 31 (unchanged since 2013)

Yolo County is a northern California county north of the state capital of Sacramento. Part of the San Francisco-San Jose commuting area, Yolo County has emerged as a bedroom community for Silicon Valley. It’s also the home of the University of California, Davis campus and is a key tomato-growing region.

 

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Max Pixel

Colorado: Weld County

- Total population in 2013: 269,785
--- White: 67.1%; Black or African American: 1.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 28.4%; Asian: 1.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.5%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 1.2%
- Total population in 2017: 304,633 (Five-year percent change: 12.92%)
--- White: 65.8%; Black or African American: 1.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 29.3%; Asian: 1.5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 1.7%
- Median age in 2017: 34.1 (up 0.1 years since 2013)

Weld County is located along Colorado's eastern Front Range, where most of the state’s population lives. A bedroom community for Denver, Weld County is also the home of nearly half of Colorado’s dairy cattle, a key area for oil and natural gas production, and the richest agricultural county east of the Rocky Mountains. Its county seat of Greeley is one of the fastest-growing municipalities in the United States.

 

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Matthewsteiger

Connecticut: Fairfield County

- Total population in 2013: 939,904
--- White: 64.3%; Black or African American: 10.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 18.2%; Asian: 4.7%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.4%; Two or more races: 1.8%
- Total population in 2017: 949,921 (Five-year percent change: 1.07%)
--- White: 61.3%; Black or African American: 10.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 19.9%; Asian: 5.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.7%; Two or more races: 2.1%
- Median age in 2017: 40.4 (up 0.5 years since 2013)

Fairfield County is the county nearest to New York City in Connecticut. The home of Bridgeport, Stamford, Norwalk, and Danbury, the county represents nearly half of the state’s population and contains both its richest and poorest communities. Connecticut’s counties have no independent government, so there is no county seat; Fairfield County only exists as a point of reference and for statistical purposes.

 

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Lee Cannon // Flickr

Delaware: Sussex County

- Total population in 2013: 206,649
--- White: 75.1%; Black or African American: 11.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 9.2%; Asian: 1.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.5%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 2.2%
- Total population in 2017: 225,322 (Five-year percent change: 9.04%)
--- White: 74.9%; Black or African American: 11.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 9.4%; Asian: 1.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 2.9%
- Median age in 2017: 49.4 (up 2.2 years since 2013)

Sussex County is the southernmost of Delaware’s three counties. Largely rural, the county is agricultural, producing the most poultry than any other county in the United States. Delaware’s beaches, most of which are located on the eastern shore of this county, are one of the county’s largest revenue producers, yielding over $700 million a year in tax revenue.

 

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Florida: Osceola County

- Total population in 2013: 298,504
--- White: 37.0%; Black or African American: 9%; Hispanic or Latino: 48.6%; Asian: 2.5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.6%; Two or more races: 2.2%
- Total population in 2017: 352,180 (Five-year percent change: 17.98%)
--- White: 32.1%; Black or African American: 9.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 53.7%; Asian: 2.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.2%; Some other race: 0.8%; Two or more races: 1.4%
- Median age in 2017: 36.3 (up 0.7 years since 2013)

Osceola County is a central Florida county that is part of the Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford Metropolitan Statistical Area. Next to Orlando’s Orange County, Osceola County is not only the recipient of investments from the Walt Disney Company—such as its involvement in the Reedy Creek Improvement District—but is also the home of several bedroom communities for Orlando workers.

 

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Thomson200 // Wikimedia Commons

Georgia: Forsyth County

- Total population in 2013: 195,405
--- White: 77.6%; Black or African American: 2.8%; Hispanic or Latino: 9.6%; Asian: 8.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 1.6%
- Total population in 2017: 227,967 (Five-year percent change: 16.66%)
--- White: 71.6%; Black or African American: 2.9%; Hispanic or Latino: 9.6%; Asian: 12.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 2.7%
- Median age in 2017: 38.5 (up 0.3 years since 2013)

Another suburban county in north-central Georgia, Forsyth hosts many bedroom communities for Atlanta. Its recent growth as a home for Atlanta’s wealthy commuters comes after an extensive campaign to overcome the county’s reputation as a sundown town that forced out its Black populace with the threat of violence in 1912. The Forsyth County Model was repeated in many counties in northern Georgia in the early 20th century, representing one of the worst collective incidents of racism in the United States post-Civil War.

 

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AlaskaDave // Wikimedia Commons

Hawaii: Hawai’I County

- Total population in 2013: 190,821
--- White: 30.7%; Black or African American: 0.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 12.2%; Asian: 20.9%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 11.7%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 23.8%
- Total population in 2017: 200,381 (Five-year percent change: 5.01%)
--- White: 29.9%; Black or African American: 0.5%; Hispanic or Latino: 12.7%; Asian: 21.7%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 10.8%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 24.1%
- Median age in 2017: 42.5 (up 1.5 years since 2013)

Hawai’I County is coterminous with the island of Hawai’I, the largest island in the state. With no incorporated cities, Hawai’I County is one of the few counties in the United States to have a mayor without being specifically defined as a city. As the state’s largest county by population and size, the county’s growth is reflective of the state’s role as a military base and international vacation hotspot.

 

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Idaho: Ada County

- Total population in 2013: 416,464
--- White: 85.7%; Black or African American: 0.9%; Hispanic or Latino: 7.5%; Asian: 2.8%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.7%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.2%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.1%
- Total population in 2017: 456,849 (Five-year percent change: 9.7%)
--- White: 84.5%; Black or African American: 1.3%; Hispanic or Latino: 8.2%; Asian: 2.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.4%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 3%
- Median age in 2017: 37.0 (up 0.8 years since 2013)

Ada County is the home of Boise, Idaho, the state’s capital. About a quarter of the state’s populace lives in the county, the second-largest in the Northwest region east of the Cascade Range. As one of the largest population centers in the region, Ada County is a primary economic engine and an incubator for local jobs.

 

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Cbradshaw // Wikimedia Commons

Illinois: Kendall County

- Total population in 2013: 119,348
--- Racial data not available
- Total population in 2017: 126,218 (Five-year percent change: 5.76%)
--- White: 69.4%; Black or African American: 6.9%; Hispanic or Latino: 18.9%; Asian: 3.5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.3%
- Median age in 2017: 35.5 (up 2.8 years since 2013)

Another bedroom community. Kendall County is a suburban county west of Chicago in the Chicagoland area. The fastest-growing county in the United States from 2000 to 2010, Kendall County is largely agricultural and defined by glacier-carved terrain. The county was recently declared a disaster area by the state for extreme levels of rainfall and excessive heat destroying much of the county’s crops.

 

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Carmel Central // Flickr

Indiana: Hamilton County

- Total population in 2013: 296,693
--- White: 84.7%; Black or African American: 3.6%; Hispanic or Latino: 3.7%; Asian: 5.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.6%; Two or more races: 1.6%
- Total population in 2017: 323,747 (Five-year percent change: 9.12%)
--- White: 83.6%; Black or African American: 4.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.1%; Asian: 5.9%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 1.9%
- Median age in 2017: 37.3 (up 1.3 years since 2013)

Hamilton County is the beneficiary of Indianapolis’s urban sprawl. Southern Hamilton County has emerged as suburbs for the state capital, with several of the county’s cities—Carmel, Fishers, and Noblesville—ranking among the state’s largest communities. The northern part of the county is agricultural.

 

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Stephen Matthew Milligan // Wikimedia Commons

Iowa: Dallas County

- Total population in 2013: 74,641
--- White: 87.3%; Black or African American: 1.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 6.3%; Asian: 3.1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 1.7%
- Total population in 2017: 87,235 (Five-year percent change: 16.87%)
--- White: 85.3%; Black or African American: 1.9%; Hispanic or Latino: 6.1%; Asian: 4.7%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 1.8%
- Median age in 2017: 35.8 (up 1.2 years since 2013)

Another bedroom community, Dallas County is the home of West Des Moines. Primarily a suburban county, Dallas County has borne witness to Des Moines’ industrial and commercial growth, with Dallas County emerging as a commuting hotspot for the region.

 

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shannonpatrick17 // Wikimedia Commons

Kansas: Douglas County

- Total population in 2013: 114,322
--- White: 84.2%; Black or African American: 0.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 8.1%; Asian: 4.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 2.6%
- Total population in 2017: 120,793 (Five-year percent change: 5.66%)
--- White: 82.1%; Black or African American: 1.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 8.7%; Asian: 5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.5%; Two or more races: 2.1%
- Median age in 2017: 29.9 (down 0.7 years since 2013)

Douglas County is near the eastern border of Kansas and is the fifth-smallest county in the state. In the Kansas City, MO-Kansas City, KS Metropolitan Statistical Area, the county is a bedroom community. The low median age is thanks to the University of Kansas in the county seat of Lawrence.

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OPMaster // Wikimedia Commons

Kentucky: Warren County

- Total population in 2013: 118,370
--- White: 80.8%; Black or African American: 9.3%; Hispanic or Latino: 5%; Asian: 2.7%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.4%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.7%
- Total population in 2017: 128,845 (Five-year percent change: 8.85%)
--- White: 78.5%; Black or African American: 8.6%; Hispanic or Latino: 5.4%; Asian: 3.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 1.4%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 2.8%
- Median age in 2017: 32.5 (down 0.3 years since 2013)

Warren County is situated near the Tennessee border in the center-west portion of Kentucky. With Bowling Green as its county seat, Warren County is within the West Kentucky Coal Field and the Pennsylvania Plateau, making it an unofficial capital of coal country. The expansion of manufacturing in the area, with Fruit of the Loom headquartered in the area, has encouraged regional growth.

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Ken Lund // Flickr

Louisiana: Ascension Parish

- Total population in 2013: 114,393
--- Racial data not available
- Total population in 2017: 122,948 (Five-year percent change: 7.48%)
--- White: 68.7%; Black or African American: 22.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 5.6%; Asian: 1.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.3%
- Median age in 2017: 35.4 (up 0.7 years since 2013)

One of the smallest parishes in Louisiana, Ascension Parish is a suburban parish for Baton Rouge. With many New Orleans and bayou residents still feeling uncomfortable returning to the region—New Orleans, for example, has yet to recover to its pre-Hurricane Katrina population—adjacent “mainland” cities like Baton Rouge have seen population spikes. Baton Rouge’s population spike is also fueled by the growth of its commercial base, which has seen new projects in filmmaking, research, and petrochemicals.

 

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Ken Lund // Flickr

Maine: Cumberland County

- Total population in 2013: 285,456
--- White: 91%; Black or African American: 2.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 1.9%; Asian: 2.1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.3%; Two or more races: 1.8%
- Total population in 2017: 292,500 (Five-year percent change: 2.47%)
--- White: 90.4%; Black or African American: 3.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 2.1%; Asian: 2.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.8%
- Median age in 2017: 41.6 (down 0.4 years since 2013)

Typically, the fastest-growing county in a state is not the most populous county. Cumberland County, Maine, is an exception. A bedroom community to Boston and Manchester, New Hampshire, Cumberland County is also home to Portland, Maine’s largest city, and the corporate headquarters of TD Bank.

 

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Marylandstater // Wikimedia Commons

Maryland: Howard County

- Total population in 2013: 304,580
--- White: 86.2%; Black or African American: 7.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 2.9%; Asian: 1.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.5%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.8%
- Total population in 2017: 321,113 (Five-year percent change: 5.43%)
--- White: 84.6%; Black or African American: 8.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 3.4%; Asian: 0.9%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.9%; Two or more races: 2.1%
- Median age in 2017: 38.6 (unchanged since 2013)

Howard County is a county in the center of Maryland. A highly affluent county, Howard County is a bedroom community for Washington D.C., Arlington, Va., and Baltimore. In 2013, the county had the third-highest median household income in the United States, and the region has received acclaim for its quality of life and schools.

 

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Bert Kaufmann // Wikimedia Commons

Massachusetts: Suffolk County

- Total population in 2013: 755,503
--- White: 46.8%; Black or African American: 19.6%; Hispanic or Latino: 21.3%; Asian: 8.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 1.2%; Two or more races: 2.5%
- Total population in 2017: 797,939 (Five-year percent change: 5.62%)
--- White: 44.9%; Black or African American: 20.6%; Hispanic or Latino: 22.9%; Asian: 8.8%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.7%; Two or more races: 1.8%
- Median age in 2017: 32.9 (up 0.7 years since 2013)

Suffolk County technically does not exist. With the county government abolished in 1999, the county distinction only exists as a subdivision for state administration and statistical analysis. It’s still the home of Boston, which is the heart of New England’s commercial, research, and education spheres.

 

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James Colby Hook III // WIkimedia Commons

Michigan: Ottawa County

- Total population in 2013: 272,701
--- White: 84.7%; Black or African American: 1.3%; Hispanic or Latino: 9.3%; Asian: 3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 1.5%
- Total population in 2017: 286,383 (Five-year percent change: 5.02%)
--- White: 83.8%; Black or African American: 1.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 9.7%; Asian: 2.7%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.5%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 1.8%
- Median age in 2017: 35.2 (up 0.5 years since 2013)

Ottawa County is a southwestern Michigan county located on the shores of Lake Michigan. A bedroom community for Milwaukee, Racine, Wis., and Grand Rapids, Mich., the county is largely rural and agricultural.

 

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John Polo // WIkimedia Commons

Minnesota: Carver County

- Total population in 2013: 95,562
--- White: 90%; Black or African American: 0.9%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.1%; Asian: 2.8%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.9%
- Total population in 2017: 102,119 (Five-year percent change: 6.86%)
--- White: 89%; Black or African American: 1.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.2%; Asian: 2.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.5%
- Median age in 2017: 37.5 (up 0.8 years since 2013)

Carver County is a suburban county of Minneapolis, located immediately southwest of Minneapolis’ Hennepin County. The home of Chanhassen, where the late musician Prince’s home and studio Paisley Park is located, is also a beneficiary of Minneapolis’ booming job market, which has driven many to the region and created a housing crush.

 

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Thomas R Machnitzki // WIkimedia Commons

Mississippi: DeSoto County

- Total population in 2013: 168,240
--- White: 68.3%; Black or African American: 24.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.9%; Asian: 1.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 1.0%
- Total population in 2017: 178,751 (Five-year percent change: 6.25%)
--- White: 64.2%; Black or African American: 26.5%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.8%; Asian: 1.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.3%; Two or more races: 2.7%
- Median age in 2017: 36.9 (up 0.5 years since 2013)

Bordering Memphis, DeSoto County is the northwestern-most county in Mississippi. DeSoto County benefited from middle-class and wealthy black Memphis residents looking for newer housing opportunities. DeSoto’s growth reflects a phenomenon nicknamed “black flight,” which, like white flight, saw the collapse of traditional inner-city neighborhoods when more affluent residents moved to the suburbs in search of better schools and opportunities.

 

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Pixabay

Missouri: Platte County

- Total population in 2013: 93,310
--- White: 82.8%; Black or African American: 6.8%; Hispanic or Latino: 5.6%; Asian: 2.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 2.0%
- Total population in 2017: 101,187 (Five-year percent change: 8.44%)
--- White: 81.1%; Black or African American: 5.5%; Hispanic or Latino: 6.2%; Asian: 3.1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.3%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 3.5%
- Median age in 2017: 38.1 (up 1.2 years since 2013)

Platte County is the home of Kansas City’s northwestern suburbs, as well as the Kansas City International Airport. It has been argued that it is the airport that has driven growth for the county which has absorbed some of Kansas City’s growth as well.

 

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Tim Evanson // WIkimedia Commons

Montana: Gallatin County

- Total population in 2013: 94,720
--- White: 92.7%; Black or African American: 0.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 3.1%; Asian: 1.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 1.4%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.5%
- Total population in 2017: 107,810 (Five-year percent change: 13.82%)
--- White: 91.9%; Black or African American: 0.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 3.6%; Asian: 1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.4%
- Median age in 2017: 33.4 (up 0.5 years since 2013)

Gallatin County is the home of Bozeman and the Bridger Mountains. The county hosts an entrance to Yellowstone National Park and the second-largest ski resort in the nation, Big Sky. It’s also a bedroom community to Butte, Mont., and the home of many high-tech, research, and software companies.

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Ammodramus // WIkimedia Commons

Nebraska: Sarpy County

- Total population in 2013: 169,331
--- White: 82.7%; Black or African American: 4%; Hispanic or Latino: 8.1%; Asian: 2.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 2.7%
- Total population in 2017: 181,439 (Five-year percent change: 7.15%)
--- White: 80.8%; Black or African American: 3.3%; Hispanic or Latino: 9.4%; Asian: 2.9%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.4%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.2%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 2.9%
- Median age in 2017: 34.5 (up 0.7 years since 2013)

Sarpy County is a county on Nebraska’s eastern border with Iowa. In the Omaha-Council Bluffs Metropolitan Statistical Area, the county is largely suburban and is the state’s third-largest county by population.

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Pixabay

Nevada: Clark County

- Total population in 2013: 2,027,868
--- Racial data not available
- Total population in 2017: 2,204,079 (Five-year percent change: 8.69%)
--- White: 83.1%; Black or African American: 6.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 5.4%; Asian: 1.1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 3.5%
- Median age in 2017: 37.3 (up 0.8 years since 2013)

Clark County is the largest county by population in Nevada. Over three-quarters of the state’s population lives in the county, making for one of the most lopsided city-state dichotomies in the nation. The county is the home of cities including Las Vegas, Boulder City, and Mesquite. Las Vegas is one of the fastest-growing cities in the United States, and much of Clark County is colloquially considered part of Las Vegas. For example, the Las Vegas Strip is technically in the cities of Paradise and Winchester, four miles from the official city borders.

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Ken Gallager // Wikimedia Commons

New Hampshire: Strafford County

- Total population in 2013: 124,593
--- White: 91.9%; Black or African American: 0.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 2.1%; Asian: 2.1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 3.0%
- Total population in 2017: 128,613 (Five-year percent change: 3.23%)
--- White: 91%; Black or African American: 1.0%; Hispanic or Latino: 2.4%; Asian: 3.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.2%
- Median age in 2017: 36.4 (down 1.5 years since 2013)

Much of southeastern New Hampshire is a suburb of Boston, and Strafford County is no exception. The home of Dover, New Hampshire, the county is a bedroom community for not only Boston but also for Manchester, New Hampshire, and Newton, Massachusetts.

 

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James Willamor // Wikimedia Commons

New Jersey: Hudson County

- Total population in 2013: 660,282
--- White: 29.3%; Black or African American: 11.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 42.9%; Asian: 14.5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.5%; Two or more races: 1.4%
- Total population in 2017: 691,643 (Five-year percent change: 4.75%)
--- White: 28.4%; Black or African American: 10.5%; Hispanic or Latino: 43.1%; Asian: 15.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.3%; Two or more races: 1.9%
- Median age in 2017: 35.2 (up 0.6 years since 2013)

Located across the Hudson River from New York City, Hudson County is New Jersey’s fourth-most populous county. Many of New Jersey’s largest cities—such as Jersey City and Bayonne—are in the county. The county is also located next to Essex County, home to the state’s largest city, Newark.

 

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Aaron Zhu // Wkimiedia Commons

New Mexico: Sandoval County

- Total population in 2013: 136,575
--- White: 45.8%; Black or African American: 1.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 36.9%; Asian: 1.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 12.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 1.9%
- Total population in 2017: 142,507 (Five-year percent change: 4.34%)
--- White: 43.4%; Black or African American: 1.5%; Hispanic or Latino: 39.0%; Asian: 1.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 12.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 2.2%
- Median age in 2017: 40 (up 0.5 years since 2013)

Sandoval County is located immediately to the north of Albuquerque. The fourth-largest county in the state by population, the region is known for its winemaking. Sandoval County is a bedroom community for Santa Fe, Albuquerque, and the nearby Los Alamos National Laboratory.

 

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Leonard J. DeFrancisci // Wikimedia Commons

New York: Bronx County

- Total population in 2013: 1,418,733
--- White: 10.3%; Black or African American: 29.5%; Hispanic or Latino: 54.6%; Asian: 3.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.6%; Two or more races: 1.1%
- Total population in 2017: 1,471,160 (Five-year percent change: 3.7%)
--- White: 9.1%; Black or African American: 29%; Hispanic or Latino: 56.2%; Asian: 3.8%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.7%; Two or more races: 1.0%
- Median age in 2017: 34 (up 0.7 years since 2013)

It isn’t a tremendous surprise that a New York City county is the fastest-growing county in New York state. The rapid growth of the Bronx, however, reflects that some of New York City’s historic Hispanic and black neighborhoods are now at risk of urban gentrification, as new residents move in looking for the most affordable rent in the city. This is leading some to believe that the identity of the Bronx is in danger of being changed forever, as other neighborhoods in New York City have experienced in recent years.

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AgnosticPreachersKid // Wikimedia Commons

North Carolina: Brunswick County

- Total population in 2013: 115,301
--- White: 81.2%; Black or African American: 10.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.8%; Asian: 0.8%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 1%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 1.7%
- Total population in 2017: 130,897 (Five-year percent change: 13.53%)
--- White: 81.9%; Black or African American: 9.8%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.8%; Asian: 0.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.5%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.7%
- Median age in 2017: 53.4 (up 3.5 years since 2013)

The southernmost county in North Carolina, Brunswick County is the home of Cape Fear and its beaches, making the county a major tourism and retirement draw. A bedroom community for Wilmington, N.C., the area has also drawn attention as a filming location for EUE/Screen Gems Studios, which has a facility in Wilmington.

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Ethan Kan // Flickr

North Dakota: Cass County

- Total population in 2013: 162,829
--- White: 88.9%; Black or African American: 3.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.2%; Asian: 1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.1%
- Total population in 2017: 177,787 (Five-year percent change: 9.19%)
--- White: 87.9%; Black or African American: 4%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.5%; Asian: 0.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.8%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.3%; Two or more races: 1.7%
- Median age in 2017: 32.9 (up 1.4 years since 2013)

Cass County is the home of Fargo, N.D.’s capital. The most populous county in the state, Cass County has seen growth in its industrial base and is the economic center of a region that includes northwestern Minnesota and eastern North Dakota.

 

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Ron Reiring // Wikimedia Commons

Ohio: Delaware County

- Total population in 2013: 184,979
--- White: 87.6%; Black or African American: 6.8%; Hispanic or Latino: 2%; Asian: 1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 2.4%
- Total population in 2017: 200,464 (Five-year percent change: 8.37%)
--- White: 86.6%; Black or African American: 7.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 2.5%; Asian: 0.7%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 2.8%
- Median age in 2017: 38.6 (up 0.8 years since 2013)

Delaware County is in the center of Ohio, near Columbus. The county is the home of the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium. With part of the city of Columbus in the county, the county has benefited greatly from Columbus’ high rate of growth.

 

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Urbanative // Wikimedia Commons

Oklahoma: Canadian County

- Total population in 2013: 126,123
--- White: 78.3%; Black or African American: 2.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 7.8%; Asian: 3.1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 4%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 4.6%
- Total population in 2017: 139,926 (Five-year percent change: 10.94%)
--- White: 76.4%; Black or African American: 2.5%; Hispanic or Latino: 8.8%; Asian: 3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 3.4%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 6%
- Median age in 2017: 35.9 (up 0.2 years since 2013)

Named for the Canadian River, not the country, Canadian County contains parts of Oklahoma City—largely because of annexation. With Oklahoma City being one of the world’s largest livestock markets and a major petroleum products provider, Canadian County has enjoyed the large number of available jobs.

 

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Brian Godfrey // flickr

Oregon: Deschutes County

- Total population in 2013: 165,954
--- White: 88.1%; Black or African American: 0.3%; Hispanic or Latino: 7.7%; Asian: 1.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.6%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.3%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.7%
- Total population in 2017: 186,875 (Five-year percent change: 12.61%)
--- White: 87.2%; Black or African American: 0.6%; Hispanic or Latino: 8%; Asian: 1.5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.2%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 2.1%
- Median age in 2017: 43 (up 0.7 years since 2013)

Deschutes County is a central Oregon county containing the city of Redmond, Ore. The hub of Central Oregon, Deschutes County oversees an economy that is largely based on fishing, logging, and tourism. Deschutes’ county seat is Bend.

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Justkillingtime // WIkimedia Commons

Pennsylvania: Centre County

- Total population in 2013: 155,403
--- White: 87.2%; Black or African American: 3.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 2.7%; Asian: 5.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.2%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.4%
- Total population in 2017: 162,660 (Five-year percent change: 4.67%)
--- White: 85.2%; Black or African American: 3.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 3%; Asian: 6.8%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.2%
- Median age in 2017: 32.1 (up 1.9 years since 2013)

Centre County, true to its name, is in the center of Pennsylvania. The home of State College, Pa. and Pennsylvania State University, the county has a strong job base in research and education.

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Kenneth C. Zirkel // Wikimedia Commons

Rhode Island: Providence County

- Total population in 2013: 628,600
--- White: 64%; Black or African American: 7.9%; Hispanic or Latino: 20.3%; Asian: 3.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.4%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 1.5%; Two or more races: 2.3%
- Total population in 2017: 637,357 (Five-year percent change: 1.39%)
--- White: 60.8%; Black or African American: 7.9%; Hispanic or Latino: 22.8%; Asian: 4.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.2%; Some other race: 1.1%; Two or more races: 2.8%
- Median age in 2017: 37.3 (unchanged since 2013)

The largest county in Rhode Island, Providence County holds more than half of the state’s population. The home of state capital Providence, the county is home to most of the state’s largest communities, including Warwick and Cranston. Despite this, Providence County is largely a bedroom community for Boston, Worcester, Mass., and Springfield, Mass.

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The ed17 // Wikimedia Commons

South Carolina: Horry County

- Total population in 2013: 289,650
--- White: 77.1%; Black or African American: 13.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 6.1%; Asian: 1.1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.5%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.2%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 1.5%
- Total population in 2017: 333,268 (Five-year percent change: 15.06%)
--- White: 77.3%; Black or African American: 13.3%; Hispanic or Latino: 6%; Asian: 1.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 1.5%
- Median age in 2017: 45.8 (up 3.2 years since 2013)

The easternmost county in South Carolina, Horry County is adjacent to Brunswick County, the fastest-growing county in North Carolina. It’s also the home of Myrtle Beach, S.C.. Because of the city’s attractiveness as a retirement and resort destination, the county has seen explosive population growth.

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Seabear70 // WIkimedia Commons

South Dakota: Minnehaha County

- Total population in 2013: 179,640
--- White: 84.7%; Black or African American: 3.8%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.7%; Asian: 1.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 2.6%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.2%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.5%
- Total population in 2017: 188,616 (Five-year percent change: 5%)
--- White: 82.8%; Black or African American: 5.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.8%; Asian: 2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 1.7%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 3.5%
- Median age in 2017: 35.1 (up 0.3 years since 2013)

Minnehaha County is the home of Sioux Falls, the largest city in South Dakota. The largest population center in the region, Minnehaha County is an essential regional communication and commercial hub. Sioux City has emerged as a leading city in the area for finance and health care, aiding in the number of jobs.

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rvsrvs // WIkimedia Commons

Tennessee: Williamson County

- Total population in 2013: 198,901
--- White: 90.9%; Black or African American: 4%; Hispanic or Latino: 2.2%; Asian: 0.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 2.3%
- Total population in 2017: 226,257 (Five-year percent change: 13.75%)
--- White: 89.6%; Black or African American: 3.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 2.6%; Asian: 1.1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 3.4%
- Median age in 2017: 38.6 (up 0.5 years since 2013)

One of the wealthiest counties in the United States, Williamson County is located south of Nashville, Tennessee. The county seat of Franklin has experienced one of the greatest population growths in Tennessee, fueled in part by the proximity of major manufacturers like Nissan and Ford and in part because of Nashville’s high population growth.

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25or6to4 // WIkimedia Commons

Texas: Hays County

- Total population in 2013: 176,026
--- White: 56.8%; Black or African American: 4.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 36.7%; Asian: 1.1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 1.0%
- Total population in 2017: 214,485 (Five-year percent change: 21.85%)
--- White: 53.8%; Black or African American: 3.8%; Hispanic or Latino: 39%; Asian: 1.5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.4%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 1.4%
- Median age in 2017: 32 (up 0.8 years since 2013)

As the home of many growing cities, such as Austin, San Marcos, and Uhland, Hays County is a direct beneficiary of the Texas state capital’s population growth. A low-income county, Hays County offers an alternative to the high property costs that plague Austin.

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Ken Lund // Flickr

Utah: Washington County

- Total population in 2013: 147,800
--- White: 72.2%; Black or African American: 5.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 16.1%; Asian: 2.5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.8%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.5%; Two or more races: 2.6%
- Total population in 2017: 165,662 (Five-year percent change: 12.09%)
--- White: 71.1%; Black or African American: 3.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 16.8%; Asian: 2.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.7%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 1.9%; Some other race: 0.9%; Two or more races: 2.6%
- Median age in 2017: 37.0 (up 2.7 years since 2013)

Washington County is the most southwestern county in Utah. Next to Nevada’s Clark County and Arizona’s Mohave County—the home of popular vacation destination Lake Havasu—Washington County has emerged as a bedroom community. The county seat St. George is one of the fastest-growing municipalities.

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Michelle Maria // WIkimedia Commons

Vermont: Chittenden County

- Total population in 2013: 159,515
--- White: 90.4%; Black or African American: 2.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 2%; Asian: 2.8%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 2%
- Total population in 2017: 162,372 (Five-year percent change: 1.79%)
--- White: 88.5%; Black or African American: 2.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 2.3%; Asian: 4.7%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 1.4%
- Median age in 2017: 36.3 (down 0.1 years since 2013)

Chittenden County is the host of Vermont’s most populous city, Burlington, Vt. The county is the home of the state’s fastest-growing communities and the state’s largest employer, the University of Vermont.

 

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Mr.TinDC // Flickr

Virginia: Loudoun County

- Total population in 2013: 349,679
--- White: 59.7%; Black or African American: 7.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 13.1%; Asian: 15.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.4%; Two or more races: 4.2%
- Total population in 2017: 398,080 (Five-year percent change: 13.84%)
--- White: 55.9%; Black or African American: 7.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 13.9%; Asian: 18.8%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 3.5%
- Median age in 2017: 36.4 (up 1.2 years since 2013)

Loudoun County has the highest median household income of any county with a population of 65,000 or more. In the Washington D.C. metropolitan area, the county is a bedroom community for Arlington and Washington D.C. in its spot next to Maryland and West Virginia.

 

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Joe Mabel // WIkimedia Commons

Washington: Snohomish County

- Total population in 2013: 745,913
--- White: 72.7%; Black or African American: 2.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 9.5%; Asian: 9.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.9%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.5%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 4%
- Total population in 2017: 801,633 (Five-year percent change: 7.47%)
--- White: 69.5%; Black or African American: 2.9%; Hispanic or Latino: 10.2%; Asian: 10.8%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.7%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.4%; Some other race: 0.3%; Two or more races: 5.3%
- Median age in 2017: 38.1 (up 0.6 years since 2013)

A suburban county to Seattle’s King County, Snohomish County forms the northern extent of the Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue Metropolitan Statistical Area. The county is bordered by Puget Sound, with almost all the county’s cities and towns located in the west. Boeing was formerly headquartered in Snohomish County and maintains a significant manufacturing presence there.

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JB Stran // Flickr

West Virginia: Berkeley County

- Total population in 2013: 108,706
--- White: 64.2%; Black or African American: 24.8%; Hispanic or Latino: 6.1%; Asian: 2.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.5%
- Total population in 2017: 114,920 (Five-year percent change: 5.72%)
--- White: 63.8%; Black or African American: 23.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 6.6%; Asian: 2.1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.4%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.4%; Two or more races: 3%
- Median age in 2017: 39.1 (up 0.4 years since 2013)

Berkeley County is a northeastern county in West Virginia. The county seat is Martinsburg, W.V. which hosts major manufacturing facilities from companies like Procter & Gamble. Martinsburg’s Internal Revenue Service office is responsible for processing most of the IRS’ e-filed business tax returns, while the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives and the U.S. Coast Guard have major offices in the county.

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Pixabay

Wisconsin: Dane County

- Total population in 2013: 509,939
--- White: 81%; Black or African American: 5.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 6.2%; Asian: 5.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 2.2%
- Total population in 2017: 536,416 (Five-year percent change: 5.19%)
--- White: 79.3%; Black or African American: 4.9%; Hispanic or Latino: 6.5%; Asian: 6.1%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.3%; Two or more races: 2.6%
- Median age in 2017: 35.1 (up 0.5 years since 2013)

Dane County is the home of Madison, the capital of Wisconsin. Madison has emerged as a technology hub, in part due to the city containing the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dane County is the home of the corporate headquarters of American Family Insurance, Lands’ End, American Girl, and Epic Systems.

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Clark // Wikimedia Commons

Wyoming: Laramie County

- Total population in 2013: 95,809
--- White: 78.8%; Black or African American: 3.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 14.1%; Asian: 1.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2%
- Total population in 2017: 98,327 (Five-year percent change: 2.63%)
--- White: 78.6%; Black or African American: 2.3%; Hispanic or Latino: 14.8%; Asian: 0.9%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.4%
- Median age in 2017: 37.4 (up 1 year since 2013)

Laramie County is the home of Wyoming’s capital Cheyenne. It is the most populous county in Wyoming, and the least-populous county in the United States to be the most-populous county of a state. In the southeastern corner of the state, Laramie County is adjacent to Colorado’s Weld County, whose county seat Greeley is among the fastest-growing municipalities in the nation.

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