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Fastest-growing county in every state

  • Fastest-growing county in every state

    The United States’ population has hit a plateau. The nation for the year ending July 2018 saw its lowest level of population growth since 1937, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Declining births, increasing deaths—largely due to the graying Baby Boomer population—and a crackdown on immigration left almost one-fifth of all states showing absolute population losses.

    While the Rocky Mountain states, Florida, and most of the Southeast have seen moderate to high levels of population growth, the Northeast, Midwest, Hawaii, Alaska, and California have seen no significant growth or negative growth. Projections show these states with little growth are likely to face larger elderly communities and a diminished work base.

    Population shifts, however, are not typically limited to just a state. People move from community to community, with some emerging as more desirable than others. This may be because of a plethora of job opportunities, high quality of life, easy commutability to job centers, low rents, or any combination of these or other factors.

    To better understand this, Stacker has created a slideshow of the fastest-growing counties in the United States, based on U.S. Census data from 2013 and 2017. For this list, we looked at counties and county equivalents, including parishes, boroughs, and independent cities, and ranked the counties by five-year percent change in population. This gallery is not sorted by percentage growth over the five-year period, but in alphabetical order by state.

    A county typically sees population growth as a “bedroom community” (a municipality with an atypically large commuting population) to a large city. These communities are typically quieter than their feeder cities, offer lower rents and a higher quality of living, and are remote enough to be immune to the feeder city’s crime, traffic, and crowds. In the case of cities with major housing crushes, such as the San Jose-San Francisco metropolitan area, bedroom communities may be 100 miles away, if not farther. Typically, however, these counties are close enough to be considered suburbs or exurbs.

    Keep reading to find out what quickly growing county was once home to Prince.

    You may also like: Counties in every state with the fastest-growing income

  • Alabama: Baldwin County

    - Total population in 2013: 195,540
    --- White: 83.1%; Black or African American: 10.3%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.6%; Asian: 0.7%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 1.0%
    - Total population in 2017: 212,628 (Five-year percent change: 8.74%)
    --- White: 83.0%; Black or African American: 9.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.6%; Asian: 1.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 1.0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 0.8%
    - Median age in 2017: 42.6 (up 1.7 years since 2013)

    Baldwin County is Alabama’s largest county by area. Adjacent to Mobile County, Baldwin is bordered by the Florida Panhandle and the Gulf of Mexico. Baldwin County was once a mostly rural county but is now fifth in population size in Alabama. It recently garnered national attention for refusing to lower its flags following the 2016 Orlando nightclub shooting, despite being ordered to do so by the governor.

  • Alaska: Matanuska-Susitna Borough

    - Total population in 2013: 95,192
    --- White: 80.9%; Black or African American: 1.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.5%; Asian: 1.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 4.6%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 7.3%
    - Total population in 2017: 106,532 (Five-year percent change: 11.91%)
    --- White: 79.2%; Black or African American: 1.3%; Hispanic or Latino: 4.9%; Asian: 1.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 6.0%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 7.0%
    - Median age in 2017: 35.2 (up 0.9 years since 2013)

    Immediately north of Anchorage, the Matanuska-Susitna Borough is home to the city of Wasilla, which came into the national attention for being the home of one-time vice-presidential nominee Sarah Palin. It also has another political claim to fame: Of the counties carried by third-party presidential nominee Ross Perot in 1992, Matanuska-Susitna Borough was the largest in both area and population.

     

  • Arizona: Pinal County

    - Total population in 2013: 389,350
    --- White: 58.2%; Black or African American: 4.5%; Hispanic or Latino: 29%; Asian: 1.5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 4.5%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.4%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 2.0%
    - Total population in 2017: 430,237 (Five-year percent change: 10.5%)
    --- White: 56.7%; Black or African American: 3.9%; Hispanic or Latino: 30.1%; Asian: 1.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 3.8%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.2%; Some other race: 0%; Two or more races: 3.6%
    - Median age in 2017: 39.6 (up 2.1 years since 2013)

    Pinal County is Arizona’s third-largest county. Between Phoenix and Tucson, the county has been the beneficiary of the two cities’ spreading growth. As such, Pinal County is largely a suburban development, with many of its towns and unincorporated areas serving as bedroom communities.

     

  • Arkansas: Benton County

    - Total population in 2013: 237,297
    --- White: 75.1%; Black or African American: 1.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 16.0%; Asian: 3.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 1.4%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 2.2%
    - Total population in 2017: 266,300 (Five-year percent change: 12.22%)
    --- White: 73.3%; Black or African American: 2.0%; Hispanic or Latino: 16.7%; Asian: 3.9%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 1.7%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.6%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 1.7%
    - Median age in 2017: 35.5 (up 0.4 years since 2013)

    Benton County is Arkansas’ northwestern-most county. The county’s seat is Bentonville, Ark., the home of Walmart. One of the few counties in Arkansas to have lax alcohol rules, Bentonville is slowly growing more cosmopolitan, due in part to investments from the Walton family and to the growing number of high-profile jobs in the area. Besides Walmart, Daisy Outdoor Products and J. B. Hunt also have corporate headquarters in the county.

     

  • California: Yolo County

    - Total population in 2013: 204,593
    --- White: 48.4%; Black or African American: 2%; Hispanic or Latino: 31.3%; Asian: 13.5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.4%; Two or more races: 4.0%
    - Total population in 2017: 219,116 (Five-year percent change: 7.1%)
    --- White: 46.5%; Black or African American: 2.5%; Hispanic or Latino: 31.8%; Asian: 13.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.5%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 5.2%
    - Median age in 2017: 31 (unchanged since 2013)

    Yolo County is a northern California county north of the state capital of Sacramento. Part of the San Francisco-San Jose commuting area, Yolo County has emerged as a bedroom community for Silicon Valley. It’s also the home of the University of California, Davis campus and is a key tomato-growing region.

     

  • Colorado: Weld County

    - Total population in 2013: 269,785
    --- White: 67.1%; Black or African American: 1.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 28.4%; Asian: 1.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.5%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 1.2%
    - Total population in 2017: 304,633 (Five-year percent change: 12.92%)
    --- White: 65.8%; Black or African American: 1.1%; Hispanic or Latino: 29.3%; Asian: 1.5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 1.7%
    - Median age in 2017: 34.1 (up 0.1 years since 2013)

    Weld County is located along Colorado's eastern Front Range, where most of the state’s population lives. A bedroom community for Denver, Weld County is also the home of nearly half of Colorado’s dairy cattle, a key area for oil and natural gas production, and the richest agricultural county east of the Rocky Mountains. Its county seat of Greeley is one of the fastest-growing municipalities in the United States.

     

  • Connecticut: Fairfield County

    - Total population in 2013: 939,904
    --- White: 64.3%; Black or African American: 10.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 18.2%; Asian: 4.7%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.4%; Two or more races: 1.8%
    - Total population in 2017: 949,921 (Five-year percent change: 1.07%)
    --- White: 61.3%; Black or African American: 10.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 19.9%; Asian: 5.4%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.7%; Two or more races: 2.1%
    - Median age in 2017: 40.4 (up 0.5 years since 2013)

    Fairfield County is the county nearest to New York City in Connecticut. The home of Bridgeport, Stamford, Norwalk, and Danbury, the county represents nearly half of the state’s population and contains both its richest and poorest communities. Connecticut’s counties have no independent government, so there is no county seat; Fairfield County only exists as a point of reference and for statistical purposes.

     

  • Delaware: Sussex County

    - Total population in 2013: 206,649
    --- White: 75.1%; Black or African American: 11.7%; Hispanic or Latino: 9.2%; Asian: 1.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.5%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 2.2%
    - Total population in 2017: 225,322 (Five-year percent change: 9.04%)
    --- White: 74.9%; Black or African American: 11.2%; Hispanic or Latino: 9.4%; Asian: 1.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.2%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 2.9%
    - Median age in 2017: 49.4 (up 2.2 years since 2013)

    Sussex County is the southernmost of Delaware’s three counties. Largely rural, the county is agricultural, producing the most poultry than any other county in the United States. Delaware’s beaches, most of which are located on the eastern shore of this county, are one of the county’s largest revenue producers, yielding over $700 million a year in tax revenue.

     

  • Florida: Osceola County

    - Total population in 2013: 298,504
    --- White: 37.0%; Black or African American: 9%; Hispanic or Latino: 48.6%; Asian: 2.5%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.6%; Two or more races: 2.2%
    - Total population in 2017: 352,180 (Five-year percent change: 17.98%)
    --- White: 32.1%; Black or African American: 9.4%; Hispanic or Latino: 53.7%; Asian: 2.3%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.2%; Some other race: 0.8%; Two or more races: 1.4%
    - Median age in 2017: 36.3 (up 0.7 years since 2013)

    Osceola County is a central Florida county that is part of the Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford Metropolitan Statistical Area. Next to Orlando’s Orange County, Osceola County is not only the recipient of investments from the Walt Disney Company—such as its involvement in the Reedy Creek Improvement District—but is also the home of several bedroom communities for Orlando workers.

     

  • Georgia: Forsyth County

    - Total population in 2013: 195,405
    --- White: 77.6%; Black or African American: 2.8%; Hispanic or Latino: 9.6%; Asian: 8.2%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.1%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.1%; Two or more races: 1.6%
    - Total population in 2017: 227,967 (Five-year percent change: 16.66%)
    --- White: 71.6%; Black or African American: 2.9%; Hispanic or Latino: 9.6%; Asian: 12.6%; American Indian or Alaska Native: 0.3%; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0%; Some other race: 0.2%; Two or more races: 2.7%
    - Median age in 2017: 38.5 (up 0.3 years since 2013)

    Another suburban county in north-central Georgia, Forsyth hosts many bedroom communities for Atlanta. Its recent growth as a home for Atlanta’s wealthy commuters comes after an extensive campaign to overcome the county’s reputation as a sundown town that forced out its Black populace with the threat of violence in 1912. The Forsyth County Model was repeated in many counties in northern Georgia in the early 20th century, representing one of the worst collective incidents of racism in the United States post-Civil War.

     

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