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Do you know the mayors of these major cities?

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trekandshoot // Shuttestock

Do you know the mayors of these major cities?

With local news making national headlines daily, all eyes turn to whichever mayor leads those cities. While mayors have fewer constituents than governors or, certainly, than the president, acting as the executive for a city is no small feat. Nowhere is that truer than in the 100 most populous cities in the country.

Different cities across the U.S. have different forms of city government. In a strong mayor government, the city council serves as the primary legislative body while the mayor serves as chief executive (or city manager) to oversee day-to-day operations while implementing the council's policy and legislative initiatives. In a council-managed city government, an elected city council includes the mayor and serves as the city's primary legislative body.

A city commission will have a city council, comprising an elected mayor and a board of elected commissioners, serving as the city's primary legislative and administrative body. Finally, a hybrid form of government will have the mayor acting as the executive while also appointing a city manager.

Using mayoral data from Ballotpedia and 2018 estimated population data from the U.S. Census Bureau, Stacker compiled a list of the 100 biggest cities in America and their mayors. The list is ranked by the cities’ populations as of 2018 and includes the government type as well as when the mayor took office and when their next term ends.

How well do you know the mayors of the biggest cities in the country?

You may also like:  Former jobs of the governor of every state

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Washington National Guard

#100. Spokane, WA: David Condon

- Population of city in 2018: 219,190
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2011
- Term ends: 2019

After defeating Democratic incumbent Mary Verner in a 2011 election, Mayor David Condon set a goal of reforming the Spokane Police Department. At the end of Condon’s first term, violent crime was down by 19.72%, while overall crime went down by 8.36%. Spokane has recently been undergoing multiple construction projects, with Condon emphasizing in his latest State of the City speech that these projects are meant to revitalize Spokane’s neighborhoods.

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Paras Griffin // Getty Images

#99. Baton Rouge, LA: Sharon Weston Broome

- Population of city in 2018: 221,599
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2017
- Term ends: 2021

Sharon Weston Broome was the first African-American to serve in the Louisiana State Senate and later became the first African-American woman to serve as mayor-president of Baton Rouge. Broome took office not long after the 2016 Louisiana floods, which heavily affected the metropolitan area of Baton Rouge. Baton Rouge is an industrial and business center in the South, and with bipartisan support, Broome was able to pass a half-cent sales tax in 2018.

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Cliff // Wikimedia Commons

#98. Richmond, VA: Levar Stoney

- Population of city in 2018: 228,783
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2016
- Term ends: 2020

Previously serving under Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe’s administration as the Secretary of the Commonwealth, Levar Stoney won a multi-candidate election to become the mayor of Richmond. At age 35, Stoney is the youngest-ever mayor of the city. Currently, Stoney’s administration is pushing a proposal to redevelop the area around the Richmond Coliseum.

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Chief Mass Communication Specialist Steve Carlson // U.S. Navy photo

#97. Boise, ID: David Bieter

- Population of city in 2018: 228,790
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2004
- Term ends: 2019

Inaugurated in 2004, David Bieter is currently the longest-serving mayor of Boise, Idaho. While the office of mayor is officially nonpartisan, Bieter is registered as a Democrat. Throughout his tenure, Bieter has emphasized the livability of Boise, attempting to make the city more welcoming and inviting by expanding the city’s parks system.

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Sanfranman59 // Wikimedia Commons

#96. Fremont, CA: Lily Mei

- Population of city in 2018: 237,807
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Nonpartisan
- Took office in: 2016
- Term ends: 2020

Previously a member of the Fremont City Council, Lily Mei’s election as mayor of Fremont, California, made her the chair of that governing body. Mei was elected on a nonpartisan platform, promising a “responsible approach to development.” Mei recently put out an open letter asking the community to show compassion towards the homeless people within the city.

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tome213 // Shutterstock

#95. Hialeah, FL: Carlos Hernández

- Population of city in 2018: 238,942
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2011
- Term ends: 2021

Carlos Hernández is a Cuban-born politician serving as the mayor of Hialeah, Fla., a city which has the highest percentage of Cuban and Cuban-American residents in the country. Hialeah has a large population and is considered the fourth-most-conservative city in the United States. Hernández has been cited for an ethics violation, incurring fines for lying in a 2011 press conference about high-interest loans of $180,000 to a Ponzi schemer.

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Trong Nguyen // Shutterstock

#94. Irving, TX: Rick Stopfer

- Population of city in 2018: 242,242
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2017
- Term ends: 2020

Prior to 2009, Irving had an entirely white and non-Hispanic city council, until a ruling from a federal judge led to a new electoral system that enabled racial minorities to be more easily voted into office. Current Mayor Rick Stopfer won on a campaign promising an improvement of water and sewer lines and the addition of new police beats and a new fire department building.

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Randy Colborn // Wikimedia Commons

#93. Garland, TX: Scott LeMay

- Population of city in 2018: 242,507
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2019
- Term ends: 2021

A former councilman for almost twelve years, Scott LeMay ran completely unopposed to secure the position of Mayor of Garland. The city of Garland was recently named as one of the best cities in the country for employment.

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JoMo333 // Shutterstock

#92. Chesapeake, VA: Richard West

- Population of city in 2018: 242,634
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2008
- Term ends: 2020

Chesapeake, Va., has diverse environments that range from farmland to forests and wetlands. Before becoming the mayor of the third-most populous city in Virginia, Rick West was elected for three terms to the city council. West cited a number of developments in transportation and road work in the city as an example of progress during his tenure.

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Mobilus In Mobili // Flickr

#91. Norfolk, VA: Kenneth Alexander

- Population of city in 2018: 244,076
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2016
- Term ends: 2020

Born and raised in Norfolk, Kenneth “Kenny” Alexander was a local business leader who served in both chambers of the Virginia General Assembly. In 2016, Alexander became the first African-American mayor of the city of Norfolk. When running for mayor, Alexander prioritized economic and workforce development while stating that he was proud of the city’s diversity.

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Airman 1st Class Dylan T. Murakami // U.S. Air Force photo

#90. North Las Vegas, NV: John Jay Lee

- Population of city in 2018: 245,949
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2013
- Term ends: 2021

The government of North Las Vegas operates with four council members and a mayor, the current one being John Jay Lee. Lee was elected in 2013 after serving on several city and county boards, and he balanced the budget in his first year as mayor. Lee started a plan to use state tax credits to jumpstart development in the area, leading to job creation.

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Unknown // Wikimedia Commons

#89. Winston-Salem, NC: Allen Joines

- Population of city in 2018: 246,328
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2001
- Term ends: 2020

Known as the “Twin City” and the “Dash,” Winston-Salem has an eight-person city council and a mayor, the current mayor being Allen Joines. A Democrat, Joines has held the office since 2001, making him the city’s longest-serving mayor; before taking the position, Joines was the deputy assistant city manager.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#88. Gilbert, AZ: Jenn Daniels

- Population of city in 2018: 248,279
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2016
- Term ends: 2020

Encompassing 76 square miles, the city of Gilbert, Arizona has seen a large increase in population in the last couple of decades. Gilbert is incorporated as a town and thus lacks some additional powers that its neighboring cities have. Current mayor Jenn Daniels served on the city council from 2009 to 2016 and as vice mayor from 2011 to 2012 before her election to mayoral office.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#87. Glendale, AZ: Jerry Weiers

- Population of city in 2018: 250,702
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2013
- Term ends: 2021

Jerry Weiers served four terms in the Arizona House of Representatives before his election as mayor of Glendale, Arizona. Glendale is known as “Arizona's Antique Capital,” with several famous historic buildings within the city limits. It is only nine miles away from downtown Phoenix and hosts the Arizona Cardinals NFL team in the State Farm Stadium.

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Lvtalon // Wikimedia Commons

#86. Reno, NV: Hillary Schieve

- Population of city in 2018: 250,998
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Nonpartisan
- Took office in: 2014
- Term ends: 2022

Reno is the third-largest city in Nevada, with a democratic municipal government that comprises seven city council members, including an elected mayor. Current Reno Mayor Hillary Schieve sought to have an amendment passed in the state senate that would grant her “Strong Mayor” executive powers, with the state assembly rejecting the bill. While Schieve is independent, she has often received support from Democratic voters.

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Joseph Plotz // Wikimedia Commons

#85. Scottsdale, AZ: Jim Lane

- Population of city in 2018: 255,310
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2009
- Term ends: 2021

Scottsdale is best known in Arizona for its high standard of living and its thriving nightlife. Republican Jim Lane is the current mayor, serving with five city council members who were also elected at-large. Lane himself served in the city council before his election as mayor, attempting to practice fiscal responsibility.

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Redraiderengineer // Wikimedia Commons

#84. Lubbock, TX: Dan Pope

- Population of city in 2018: 255,885
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2016
- Term ends: 2020

The mayor of Lubbock, Texas, Dan Pope, made public safety his focus after winning his second term, proposing a new police facility. The city is split into six districts, each with their own elected city council member and one member of the council acting as the mayor pro tempore. Lubbock has a large arts and music scene, with a cultural center named after Buddy Holly, who was local to the area.

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Naeemnixon // Wikimedia Commons

#83. Buffalo, NY: Byron Brown

- Population of city in 2018: 256,304
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2005
- Term ends: 2021

Buffalo is the second-largest city in New York state, and the largest in Western New York, with eleven council members and a mayor. Current mayor Byron Brown served in several political roles for Buffalo and Erie County before becoming mayor in 2005 and has been highly active on the statewide political front since then. As mayor, Brown has received criticism for the demolition of several vacant and potentially historical buildings as a part of his economic revitalization and development plans.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#82. Chandler, AZ: Kevin Hartke

- Population of city in 2018: 257,165
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Nonpartisan
- Took office in: 2019
- Term ends: 2023

Chandler, Ariz. has five council members, a vice mayor, and a mayor, all representing the city at-large. Current mayor Kevin Hartke was both a council member and vice mayor and became mayor after a nonpartisan election. In addition to his duties as mayor, Hartke continues to serve as a pastor at the Trinity Christian Fellowship in Chandler.

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Eugene Kim // Flickr

#81. Madison, WI: Satya Rhodes-Conway

- Population of city in 2018: 258,054
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2019
- Term ends: 2023

The Common Council in Madison, Wis., comprises 20 members, each representing a district of the city. Current mayor Satya Rhodes-Conway served in that council until 2013, and won the election to become mayor in 2019, becoming the first openly gay mayor of the city. On her first day on the job, Rhodes-Conway announced plans for maintenance and reconstruction for Buckeye Road.

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U.S. Customs and Border Protection // Flickr

#80. Laredo, TX: Pete Saenz

- Population of city in 2018: 261,639
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Independent
- Took office in: 2014
- Term ends: 2022

The city government of Laredo, Texas, a city with a 95.6% Hispanic and Latino population, has a “strong city council/weak mayor” system, with the mayor presiding over the eight-member city council but only voting to break ties. Elections are nonpartisan, but many officials, including current mayor Pete Saenz, are affiliated with the Democratic Party. Saenz has recently prioritized fighting political corruption in the city.

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CityofStPete // Wikimedia Commons

#79. St. Petersburg, FL: Rick Kriseman

- Population of city in 2018: 265,098
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2014
- Term ends: 2022

Also known as St. Pete for short, St. Petersburg has eight city council members and has used the strong mayor form of government only since 1993. Democrat Rick Kriseman was formerly a city council member before serving in the Florida House of Representatives from 2006 to 2012 and won election as mayor in 2013 in a hotly contested campaign with many endorsements from prominent Democrats. In 2015, Kriseman received media attention for tweeting about his intention of “barring” Donald Trump from the city after the president’s comments on potentially banning Muslims.

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May S. Young // Flickr

#78. Jersey City, NJ: Steven Fulop

- Population of city in 2018: 265,549
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2013
- Term ends: 2021

Six of the nine city council members of Jersey City represent wards, while they elect the other three at-large, all in nonpartisan elections. Current mayor Steven Fulop focused on ethics reform as a city councilman and touted his reputation as a reformer in his campaign for mayor. Fulop has focused on revitalizing the inner city and increasing transparency, using technology and social media to make the city government more accessible.

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Kevin Mullett // Flickr

#77. Fort Wayne, IN: Tom Henry

- Population of city in 2018: 267,633
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2008
- Term ends: 2020

Fort Wayne is the second-largest city in Indiana, with its city government composed of a mayor, a city clerk, and nine city council members. In recent years, Fort Wayne has experienced suburban growth, opening lifestyle centers and medical centers. Tom Henry represented the Third District of the city for five terms in the city council before losing re-election in 2003, but was elected to the office of mayor in 2007.

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Spongie555 // Wikimedia Commons

#76. Chula Vista, CA: Mary Salas

- Population of city in 2018: 271,651
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2014
- Term ends: 2022

Mary Salas served in the California State Assembly from 2006 to 2010 but lost an election for State Senate in 2010. In 2014, Salas was elected to the office of mayor, becoming the first Latina mayor of Chula Vista. The city is a California charter city and has four city council members. The police and fire departments in the city are understaffed, with ambulance services contracted out to American Medical Response.

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James Willamo // Flickr

#75. Durham, NC: Steve Schewel

- Population of city in 2018: 274,291
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2017
- Term ends: 2019

Durham is known for its activist community and for lively and contentious politics. The area is predominantly Democratic, with current mayor Steve Schewel being a member of the party despite nonpartisan elections. As a candidate for mayor in 2017, Schewel ran on a platform emphasizing immigrant rights, affordable housing, police reform, and support for the LGBTQ+ community.

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David Wilson // Flickr

#74. Toledo, OH: Wade Kapszukiewicz

- Population of city in 2018: 274,975
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2018
- Term ends: 2022

Known as “The Glass City” for being one of the first glass manufacturers in the 1880s, the city of Toledo found its first mayor from Generation X in Wade Kapszukiewicz. Kapszukiewicz was previously Lucas County Treasurer from 2005 until 2018, when he won the mayoral election for Toledo. During his tenure Kapszukiewicz created the first regional water system and increased the size and diversity of the police force, with additional goals of improving educational opportunities for the city’s youth and overall improving city services.

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Lorie Shaull // Wikimedia Commons

#73. Newark, NJ: Ras J. Baraka

- Population of city in 2018: 282,090
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2014
- Term ends: 2022

Ras J. Baraka, poet and former Municipal Council member, is the first elected Mayor of Newark since the resignation of now-Senator Cory Booker. Issues that Baraka has attempted to address include crime and gang violence and taking back local control of the school system. Baraka has earned praise for “improving Newark’s economic prospects,” but has been called a "hostile guy" by then-Governor Chris Christie and was once accused of campaign finance irregularities.

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Azusa Tarn // Wikimedia Commons

#72. Irvine, CA: Christina Shea

- Population of city in 2018: 282,572
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2019
- Term ends: 2020

Irvine, Calif., is a charter city with a mayor and four city council members. The mayor serves in two-year terms, with the current mayor being Republican Christina Shea after winning a nonpartisan election. Prior to being mayor, Shea was a city council member who focused on public safety, the parks system, and veterans affairs.

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City of Orlando // Wikimedia Commons

#71. Orlando, FL: Buddy Dyer

- Population of city in 2018: 285,713
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2003
- Term ends: 2020

Before becoming Mayor of Orlando in 2003, Buddy Dyer served on the Florida State Senate from 1992 to 2002. Shortly after his election as mayor, Dyer was accused of election fraud and was suspended by then-Governor Jeb Bush until his reinstatement in 2005. As mayor, Dyer unveiled his vision of making Orlando into a “world-class city” and advocated for new arts centers and a new arena for the Orlando Magic NBA team.

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Katherine Welles // Shutterstock

#70. Lincoln, NE: Leirion Gaylor Baird

- Population of city in 2018: 287,401
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2019
- Term ends: 2023

Lincoln, Neb. was designed as a refugee-friendly city in the 1970s, receiving many refugees from Middle Eastern countries. Current Mayor Leirion Gaylor Baird was both planning commissioner and city councilwoman of Lincoln, and campaigned on a platform for additional road funding for the city, environmental preservation, and community land trusts.

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Unknown // Wikimedia Commons

#69. Plano, TX: Harry LaRosiliere

- Population of city in 2018: 288,061
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2013
- Term ends: 2021

Born in Haiti and raised in Harlem, Harry LaRosiliere would later move to Plano, Texas, to become a financial advisor. LaRosiliere later won election as the Mayor of Plano, running on a platform of “economic prosperity for all.” He is the first African-American Mayor of Plano, a city that is a hub for several corporate headquarters.

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U.S. Department of State // Flickr

#68. Anchorage, AK: Ethan Berkowitz

- Population of city in 2018: 291,538
- Government type: Hybrid
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2015
- Term ends: 2021

Ethan Berkowitz served as a member of the Alaska House of Representatives from 1997 to 2007, but lost several statewide elections from 2006 onward. Finally, Berkowitz won the 2015 election for Mayor of Anchorage, which is the most populous city in Alaska. Anchorage generally leans Republican and has a hybrid government system with an eleven-member assembly and the mayor as the city’s chief executive.

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Kevin Ruck // Shutterstock

#67. Greensboro, NC: Nancy B. Vaughan

- Population of city in 2018: 294,722
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2013
- Term ends: 2021

After serving on the city council of Greensboro at large, Nancy B. Vaughan was elected as mayor of the city with 59% of the vote. Vaughan ran on a platform promising economic development, increased public safety, and an improvement in the city’s overall quality of life. Greensboro has nine city council seats, including the mayor; five are district representatives, while three represent the city at-large.

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Popscreenshot // Wikimedia Commons

#66. Pittsburgh, PA: Bill Peduto

- Population of city in 2018: 301,048
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2014
- Term ends: 2022

Known as the “Steel City” and the “City of Bridges,” Pittsburgh today generates billions of dollars thanks to major technology companies like Google, Apple, Microsoft, and IBM. Current Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto took office in 2014 after also serving as a city councilman. Since then, Peduto has advocated for ride-sharing operators in the city.

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Hayden Schiff // Wikimedia Commons

#65. Cincinnati, OH: John Cranley

- Population of city in 2018: 302,605
- Government type: Hybrid
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2013
- Term ends: 2021

Despite being a Democrat, John Cranley was voted by readers of the Cincinnati CityBeat as the “Best Conservative.” Cranley won re-election as Mayor of Cincinnati running on a platform that emphasized reducing poverty and supporting minority and women-owned businesses. Cincinnati has moved from a council-manager structure of government to more of a “strong mayor” format.

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Paul Sableman // Wikimedia Commons

#64. St. Louis, MO: Lyda Krewson

- Population of city in 2018: 302,838
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2017
- Term ends: 2021

From 1997 to 2017, Lyda Krewson was the alderman of St. Louis's 28th ward, leading the efforts for a successful smoking ban in 2011. Krewson won a competitive primary to be the Democratic nominee for the mayoral election for St. Louis, ultimately moving on to an easy win in the general election, as St. Louis has not elected a Republican to that office since 1949. She is the first female mayor of the city.

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Lorie Shaull // Flickr

#63. St. Paul, MN: Melvin Carter III

- Population of city in 2018: 307,695
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2018
- Term ends: 2022

Melvin Carter was elected as the Mayor of St. Paul in 2017, becoming the first African-American to hold that office. Carter campaigned on quality education, business development, and community policing. As mayor, Carter acts as chief executive to the city, while legislation comes from the seven-person city council.

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Khairil Azhar Junos // Shutterstock

#62. Henderson, NV: Debra March

- Population of city in 2018: 310,390
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2017
- Term ends: 2021

Before serving as Mayor of Henderson, Nev., Debra March spent eight years in the city council. During her tenure, March was found guilty of an ethics violation for failing to disclose her relationship with the Henderson Community Foundation while the city council was voting on legislation relating to that foundation. The city is divided into four wards, and while council members are voted citywide, no more than one can reside in the same ward.

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Michael Tubbs // Wikimedia Commons

#61. Stockton, CA: Michael Tubbs

- Population of city in 2018: 311,178
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2017
- Term ends: 2020

Michael Tubbs became the youngest city council member in 2013 at 22 and became the youngest mayor and first African-American mayor of Stockton, Calif., in 2017. Tubbs is an advocate for universal basic income and selected residents of Stockton to receive a “no strings attached” stipend of $500 every 18 months. Stockton was named an “All-American City” several times, most recently in 2017.

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Henryk Sadura // Shutterstock

#60. Lexington, KY: Linda Gorton

- Population of city in 2018: 323,780
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2019
- Term ends: 2022

Linda Gorton is the recently elected Mayor of Lexington, taking office after her stint as the longest-serving member of the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Council. Lexington has nonpartisan elections for its city council, with the member receiving the most votes also having the title of vice mayor. The city is home to several horse race tracks.

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Mglsndst1993 // Wikimedia Commons

#59. Corpus Christi, TX: Joe McComb

- Population of city in 2018: 326,554
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2017
- Term ends: 2020

In various periods from 1983 to 2014, Joe McComb served in the Corpus Christi City Council before taking office as the mayor of the city in 2017. Corpus Christi, meaning “body of Christ” in Latin, has a council-manager municipal government. McComb campaigned on a message of unity and promised clean water and careful management of the city’s financial resources.

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Mike's Birds // Flickr

#58. Riverside, CA: Rusty Bailey

- Population of city in 2018: 330,063
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Independent
- Took office in: 2012
- Term ends: 2020

Riverside, Calif., is east of downtown Los Angeles and located in the Inland Empire region. The current mayor is Rusty Bailey, who previously served on the Riverside City Council from 2007 to 2012. Bailey promoted transparency and job creation in his electoral campaign, ultimately winning the nonpartisan election.

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Steve Cukrov // Shutterstock

#57. Santa Ana, CA: Miguel Pulido

- Population of city in 2018: 332,725
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 1994
- Term ends: 2020

Santa Ana is the second largest metropolitan area in the United States, with its government comprising six city council members. Current Mayor of Santa Ana Miguel Pulido has held that position since 1994, but has been investigated for a number of corruption scandals. Most recently, Pulido has been accused of running a side business and personally renting out city-owned property.

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edmorita // Wikimedia Commons

#56. Honolulu, HI: Kirk Caldwell

- Population of city in 2018: 347,397
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2013
- Term ends: 2021

After the resignation of Honolulu Mayor Mufi Hannemann, then-City Council member Kirk Caldwell became the interim mayor for the Hawaiian city-county. After losing a special election in 2010, Caldwell won back the office in a 2013 general election. As mayor, Caldwell crafted several anti-homeless laws outlawing living in parks and sleeping on sidewalks.

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NAPA // Shutterstock

#55. Anaheim, CA: Harry Sidhu

- Population of city in 2018: 352,005
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2018
- Term ends: 2022

Formerly from the Anaheim City Council, Harry Sidhu became the first Sikh Mayor of Anaheim and the first person of color to serve as mayor of the city. Anaheim is the home of the Disneyland Resort, with disputes and controversies stemming from Disney’s relationship with the city government. A recent change from a public measure has council seats elected by district instead of at-large.

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Staff Sgt. Jessica Kind // U.S. Air Force photo

#54. Aurora, CO: Bob LeGare

- Population of city in 2018: 374,114
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2018
- Term ends: 2019

Aurora is part of the Denver metropolitan area, and the site of a 2012 shooting at a Century movie theater. Before becoming Mayor of Aurora, Bob LeGare worked in real estate, and then served on the Aurora City Council for 15 years. Elections are nonpartisan, with the city council having 10 members––not including the mayor who acts as manager to the council.

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ELW // Shutterstock

#53. Bakersfield, CA: Karen Goh

- Population of city in 2018: 383,579
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2017
- Term ends: 2020

The place of origin for the “Bakersfield sound” of country music, this charter city uses the council-manager form of government. Bakersfield is considered the most conservative city in California, with the current mayor being Republican Karen Goh. Bakersfield includes all of Kern County, which is the most productive oil-producing county in the United States.

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Cpl. Reagan Lodge // USMC

#52. Cleveland, OH: Frank Jackson

- Population of city in 2018: 383,793
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2006
- Term ends: 2021

Cleveland is the second-largest city in Ohio and historically has had a large population of immigrants and migrants. The Mayor of Cleveland acts as a chief executive, with a city council of 17. Current Mayor Frank Jackson has won four mayoral elections, first winning in 2005 after public dissatisfaction with the leadership at the time.

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Sean Pavone // Shutterstock

#51. Wichita, KS: Jeff Longwell

- Population of city in 2018: 389,255
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2015
- Term ends: 2019

Wichita is the largest city in the state of Kansas, and serves as a hub for several aircraft production companies as the unofficial “Air Capital of the World.” Wichita is also a central cultural hub, and an important location for industrial companies. The city government has a council-manager structure, with the current Mayor of Wichita being former City Councilman Jeff Longwell.

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Jonathan Bachman // Getty Images

#50. New Orleans, LA: LaToya Cantrell

- Population of city in 2018: 391,006
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2018
- Term ends: 2022

After her election in 2017, LaToya Cantrell became the first female Mayor of New Orleans in its entire 300-year long year history. While in office, Cantrell established a new Office of Youth and Families, as well as a Gun Violence Reduction Council. Cantrell’s "FairShare" initiative is focused on improving city infrastructure and public spaces, including several new lawsuits against opioid manufacturers.

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Clément Bardot // Wikimedia Commons

#49. Tampa, FL: Jane Castor

- Population of city in 2018: 392,890
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2019
- Term ends: 2023

Jane Castor acted as the first female police chief of the Tampa Police Department from 2009 to 2015 and became the first LGBTQ+ mayor of Tampa. When running for mayor in 2019, Castor touted a record of reducing crime in the city by 70%. The city council has seven elected members, four from specific numbered areas and three representing Tampa at-large.

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sk // Flickr

#48. Arlington, TX: Jeff Williams

- Population of city in 2018: 398,112
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2015
- Term ends: 2021

Mayor Jeff Williams of Arlington, Texas, was a volunteer for several organizations and most notably served in the City of Arlington's City Comprehensive Planning Committee. Citywide elections are nonpartisan, but most of the eight council members, as well as Williams, are Republican.

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Naval Surface Warriors // Flickr

#47. Tulsa, OK: G. T. Bynum

- Population of city in 2018: 400,669
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2016
- Term ends: 2020

Before returning to his hometown of Tulsa, G.T. Bynum worked as a staffer for United States Senators Don Nickles and Tom Coburn from 2000 to 2006. Upon returning home, Bynum served four terms as a city councilor for Tulsa’s ninth district. After his election as Mayor of Tulsa, Bynum became the third-youngest person to hold that office.

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Tony Webster // Wikimedia Commons

#46. Minneapolis, MN: Jacob Frey

- Population of city in 2018: 425,403
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2018
- Term ends: 2021

Jacob Frey is a member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party in Minnesota and represented the Third Ward of Minneapolis in the Minneapolis City Council. Frey ran for the mayor’s office in 2017 on a campaign supporting affordable housing and improving police-community relations. At the beginning of his tenure as mayor, Frey pushed for a plan that would allow for the building of four-plexes in every part of the city.

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Jim Ratliff // Wikimedia Commons

#45. Oakland, CA: Elizabeth "Libby" Schaaf

- Population of city in 2018: 429,082
- Government type: Hybrid
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2015
- Term ends: 2019

Libby Schaaf’s career in Oakland politics including acting as the chief of staff to former Oakland City Council President Ignacio De La Fuente and a stint as an aide to former Oakland Mayor Jerry Brown. Schaaf represented the 4th District of Oakland in the City Council from 2011 to 2015 and was elected Mayor in 2015. As Mayor of Oakland, Schaaf formed the city’s first Department of Transportation.

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Sherry V Smith // Shutterstock

#44. Virginia Beach, VA: Bobby Dyer

- Population of city in 2018: 450,189
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2018
- Term ends: 2020

Republican Robert “Bobby” Dyer defeated his Democratic opponent in a 2018 election for Mayor of Virginia Beach, despite being outspent 5 to 1. Prior to his election, Dyer was a member of the city council for 14 years. A municipal government building in Virginia Beach was the site of a mass shooting during Dyer’s mayoral tenure in May 2019.

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Dbrezenoff // Wikimedia Commons

#43. Long Beach, CA: Robert Garcia

- Population of city in 2018: 467,354
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2014
- Term ends: 2022

Born in Peru, Robert Garcia moved to the United States with his mother at age 5. Upon his election to the Long Beach City Council in 2009, Garcia became the youngest person, the first Latino male, and the first gay person of color to be elected to the council. As Mayor of Long Beach, Garcia has primarily focused on improving educational institutions.

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Matt Johnson // Wikimedia Commons

#42. Omaha, NE: Jean Stothert

- Population of city in 2018: 468,262
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2013
- Term ends: 2021

Before her career in politics, Jean Stothert was a head nurse and a member of the Millard Board of Education. Stothert represented District 5 on the Omaha City Council, and in 2012, was elected to become the first female Mayor of Omaha.

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AllThings Open // Flickr

#41. Raleigh, NC: Nancy McFarlane

- Population of city in 2018: 469,298
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Independent
- Took office in: 2011
- Term ends: 2019

While politically independent, Nancy McFarlane won election to be Mayor of Raleigh with the endorsement of the Democratic Party, running with the promise of environmental protection. McFarlane was previously a pharmacist and served in the city council. Historically, Raleigh has been ruled by conservative Democratic politicians.

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Eduardo J. Padrón Campus // Flickr

#40. Miami, FL: Francis Suarez

- Population of city in 2018: 470,914
- Government type: Hybrid
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2017
- Term ends: 2021

While Francis Suarez is the 43rd Mayor of Miami, he is also the first mayor to have actually been born in the city. Suarez was the City of Miami Commissioner for District 4 prior to his election. In the past couple of decades, Miami has seen a significant increase in high-rise skyscraper construction.

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Senior Airman Tiffany DeNault // U.S. Air Force photo

#39. Colorado Springs, CO: John W. Suthers

- Population of city in 2018: 472,688
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2015
- Term ends: 2019

Before taking an executive position as Mayor of Colorado Springs, John W. Suthers was a United States Attorney for Colorado, and later the Attorney General for the State of Colorado. Since the beginning of his tenure as mayor, Colorado Springs has added about 7,500 jobs per year. Suthers won reelection in 2019 in a landslide, with 74% of the vote in a four-way race.

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quintonlucas.org

#38. Kansas City, MO: Quinton Lucas

- Population of city in 2018: 491,918
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2019
- Term ends: 2023

Quinton Lucas is the newest Mayor of Kansas City, as of Aug. 1, 2019. Lucas previously held a city council seat representing the Third District where he was known for crafting a Five-Point Plan to combat crime in the city. While debating the development of a new airport, Lucas advocated for transparency in the process, disagreeing with his colleague, then-Mayor Sly James.

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Afdahe // Wikimedia Commons

#37. Atlanta, GA: Keisha Bottoms

- Population of city in 2018: 498,044
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2018
- Term ends: 2021

While serving in the Atlanta City Council, Keisha Lance Bottoms represented the southwest region of the city. When Bottoms was elected Mayor of Atlanta, she was under investigation for payments to her campaign staff that were not properly reported. Including Bottoms, every Mayor of Atlanta since 1973 has been African-American. The revitalization of Atlanta’s neighborhoods still continues after the 1996 Atlanta Summer Olympic Games.

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Tim Engle // Flickr

#36. Sacramento, CA: Darrell Steinberg

- Population of city in 2018: 508,529
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2016
- Term ends: 2020

Sacramento politician Darrell Steinberg was a member of the California State Assembly, and later the President pro tempore of the California State Senate. Steinberg won the election to become the Mayor of Sacramento in 2016, avoiding a runoff. For most of his political career, Steinberg has been an advocate for better mental health support and health care.

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Tim Roberts Photography // Shutterstock

#35. Mesa, AZ: John Giles

- Population of city in 2018: 508,958
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2014
- Term ends: 2020

Republican John Giles was a member of the Mesa City Council from 1996 to 2000, also serving as the vice mayor in his final two years in the council. Giles won a special election for mayor in 2014 and won his own full term in 2016. Mesa is the largest suburban city in the United States and the third-largest city in Arizona.

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James Kirkikis // Shutterstock

#34. Fresno, CA: Lee Brand

- Population of city in 2018: 530,093
- Government type: Hybrid
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2017
- Term ends: 2021

Lee Brand had been connected to the Fresno City Council for some time, managing the successful campaign of one member, when he lost an election to the council in 2000. Brand was finally elected to the council in 2004. Recently, Fresno was the site of back-to-back shootings by one assailant in April 2017.

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Bill Morrow // Flickr

#33. Tucson, AZ: Jonathan Rothschild

- Population of city in 2018: 545,975
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2011
- Term ends: 2019

A third-generation Tucsonian, Jonathan Rothschild is a lawyer and law professor in addition to his career in politics. As mayor, Rothschild pushed for initiatives including Help for Homebuyers, Steps to Success, and the Citizenship Campaign. Thanks to its burgeoning food scene, Tucson became the first American city to be designated a "City of Gastronomy" in 2017 by UNESCO.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#32. Albuquerque, NM: Tim Keller

- Population of city in 2018: 560,218
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2017
- Term ends: 2021

Current Albuquerque Mayor Tim Keller was a legislator in the New Mexico State Senate and held statewide office as the New Mexico State Auditor. In his term as mayor, Keller has gathered input from hundreds of community members and addressed several issues such as crime, sexual assault reports, and a city-wide effort to clean up the Animal Welfare Department.

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Tom Barrett // Wikimedia Commons

#31. Milwaukee, WI: Tom Barrett

- Population of city in 2018: 592,025
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2004
- Term ends: 2020

Tom Barrett has held positions in both the Wisconsin state government and the federal government, serving in both chambers of the Wisconsin legislature and in the United States House of Representatives. While serving as Mayor of Milwaukee, Barrett ran run for Governor of Wisconsin twice: once in 2010, losing to Scott Walker, and again in the 2012 recall election where he again lost to Walker.

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Sean Pavone // Shutterstock

#30. Baltimore, MD: Bernard C. "Jack" Young

- Population of city in 2018: 602,495
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2019
- Term ends: 2020

Previously the Baltimore City Council President, Jack Young became the Mayor of Baltimore after his scandal-embroiled predecessor Catherine Pugh vacated the office. In the past decade, Baltimore has undergone a slew of redevelopment projects, one being the construction of a new headquarters for Under Armour. The city has remained a Democratic stronghold for the past roughly 150 years.

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Festival of Faiths // Flickr

#29. Louisville, KY: Greg Fischer

- Population of city in 2018: 620,118
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2010
- Term ends: 2022

Current Mayor of Louisville Greg Fischer has had a long, extensive business career before entering politics. Fischer fell short of winning the nomination for a 2008 U.S. Senate primary race, with the winner of that primary eventually losing to Mitch McConnell. Fischer eventually found political success in his winning mayoral campaign, where he promised to make Louisville into a “more compassionate” city.

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Lawrence Crespo // U.S. Air Force photo

#28. Las Vegas, NV: Carolyn Goodman

- Population of city in 2018: 644,644
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Nonpartisan
- Took office in: 2011
- Term ends: 2019

Upon taking office in 2011, Carolyn Goodman succeeded her husband Oscar Goodman in the office of Mayor of Las Vegas. As mayor, Goodman has attempted to promote Las Vegas as a home for national sports teams. Las Vegas is yet another city struck by gun violence, with a mass shooting in October 2017.

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Sean Pavone // Shutterstock

#27. Oklahoma City, OK: David Holt

- Population of city in 2018: 649,021
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2018
- Term ends: 2022

Politician David Holt left his home state of Oklahoma for a time to serve as an aide to then-Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert and returned to Oklahoma to work for George W. Bush’s re-election campaign. Holt also served as the chief of staff to then-Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett until he was elected to the Oklahoma State Senate. Holt succeeded Cornett in 2018, becoming the first Native American mayor of the city.

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Sean Pavone // Shutterstock

#26. Memphis, TN: Jim Strickland

- Population of city in 2018: 650,618
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2016
- Term ends: 2020

Jim Strickland’s election as Mayor of Memphis marked the first time since 1991 in which the city had a Caucasian mayor. Before his election, Strickland was a member of the Memphis City Council, eventually becoming the Chairman of the Council. The city is the largest on the Mississippi River and is a cultural hub for arts and entertainment.

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US Department of Labor // Wikimedia Commons

#25. Portland, OR: Ted Wheeler

- Population of city in 2018: 653,115
- Government type: City commission
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2017
- Term ends: 2021

Upon his election as Mayor of Portland, Ted Wheeler stated that he saw himself as a “transitional mayor.” Prior to the election, Wheeler was the Oregon State Treasurer. Citizens have recently petitioned Wheeler to address the growth of homelessness, with half of the arrests in the city reported to be homeless people.

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U.S. Army Corp of Engineers // Flickr

#24. Nashville, TN: David Briley

- Population of city in 2018: 669,053
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2015
- Term ends: 2019

David Briley was the at-large metro councilman for Davidson County from 1999 to 2007, losing a mayoral election in 2006. Briley was elected Vice Mayor of Nashville in 2015 and ascended to mayor after Mayor Megan Barry resigned. Nashville has a consolidated city-county government that includes six smaller municipalities in a two-tier system.

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Barbara Barefield // Wikimedia Commons

#23. Detroit, MI: Mike Duggan

- Population of city in 2018: 672,662
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2014
- Term ends: 2022

Though Detroit is a majority-African American city, Mike Duggan became the city’s first Caucasian mayor since the early 1970s. Before his election in 2013, Duggan was deputy county executive from 1987 to 2001 and worked in the private sector afterwards. The past decade of Duggan’s mayoral service have been marked by initiatives to improve the cityscape.

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Sean Pavone // Shutterstock

#22. El Paso, TX: Dee Margo

- Population of city in 2018: 682,669
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2017
- Term ends: 2021

Dee Margo served a single term in the Texas House of Representatives and was elected as Mayor of El Paso in 2017. Margo caught national attention for disputing a claim that President Donald Trump made about El Paso in a State of the Union address. The city again gained nationwide attention after a mass shooting in a Wal-Mart in August 2019.

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Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston // Flickr

#21. Boston, MA: Martin Walsh

- Population of city in 2018: 694,583
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2014
- Term ends: 2022

Martin “Marty” Walsh served in the Massachusetts House of Representatives from 1997 to 2014. Shortly after, Walsh was elected as Mayor of Boston, promising to promote a “24-hour Boston.” In 2017, Walsh gave a speech emphasizing the city’s status as a sanctuary city.

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Lorie Shaull

#20. Washington D.C.: Muriel Bowser

- Population of city in 2018: 702,455
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2015
- Term ends: 2019

Muriel Bowser is the eighth Mayor of Washington D.C., previously serving on the Council of the District of Columbia from 2007 to 2015. Bowser pledged to end chronic homelessness in the area, and overall has pushed a progressive agenda on all social and financial issues. The District of Columbia continues to advocate for its own right to statehood.

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Mike Johnston // Wikimedia Commons

#19. Denver, CO: Michael B. Hancock

- Population of city in 2018: 716,492
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2011
- Term ends: 2019

After a career in business, Michael Hancock was a leader on neighborhood issues in the Denver City Council. Hancock was the elected successor to John Hickenlooper, who resigned to run for Governor of Colorado. In Hancock’s first year in office, he admitted to sending inappropriate text messages to a female subordinate.

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Joe Mabel // Wikimedia Commons

#18. Seattle, WA: Jenny Durkan

- Population of city in 2018: 744,955
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2017
- Term ends: 2021

Prior to holding elected office, Jenny Durkan was appointed by then-President Barack Obama as the U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Washington. Upon taking office, Durkan became the second consecutive openly LGBTQ+ mayor of Seattle. The LGBTQ+ community in Seattle is ranked sixth largest of any city in the country.

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Steve Baker // Flickr

#17. Indianapolis, IN: Joseph Hogsett

- Population of city in 2018: 867,125
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2016
- Term ends: 2020

Attorney Joseph Hogsett held several titles throughout his career, such as the Secretary of State of Indiana from 1989 to 1994 and United States Attorney for the Southern District of Indiana more recently. Hogsett is now the Mayor of Indianapolis, and will run for reelection in 2019. The city government has been a consolidated city-county government since 1970.

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MaxPixel

#16. Charlotte, NC: Vi Lyles

- Population of city in 2018: 872,498
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2017
- Term ends: 2019

Charlotte, N.C., has been the site of multiple high-profile police shootings in the past few years. While serving in the Charlotte City Council, Vi Lyles outlined a seven-point plan to reduce racial and class divisions in the city. After being elected mayor in 2017, Lyle became the first African-American female mayor for the city.

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Pax Ahimsa Gethen // Wikimedia Commons

#15. San Francisco, CA: London Breed

- Population of city in 2018: 883,305
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2018
- Term ends: 2020

London Breed of San Francisco served on the board of supervisors and, later, as its president. She became acting mayor upon the death of then-Mayor Ed Lee. Breed then won a special election for the office and became the first black woman to be elected as mayor. San Francisco is still thought to be one of the most livable cities in the nation, and also serves as headquarters for a number of technology companies, such as Dropbox and Salesforce.

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Sean Pavone // Shutterstock

#14. Columbus, OH: Andrew J. Ginther

- Population of city in 2018: 892,533
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2015
- Term ends: 2019

Nearly two decades of experience in Columbus politics brought Andrew Ginther to the Columbus Board of Education, the Columbus City Council, and finally to mayoral office. Columbus is one of the fastest-growing cities in the nation and boasts a diverse economy. Ginther, in his 2015 campaign for Mayor, touted his experience helping to reduce the infant mortality rate in the city and his support for reproductive health.

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CityOfFortWorth // Flickr

#13. Fort Worth, TX: Betsy Price

- Population of city in 2018: 895,008
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2011
- Term ends: 2019

Current Fort Worth Mayor Betsy Price was primarily a businesswoman and entered politics in 2000 as Tarrant County’s Tax Assessor. In 2011, Price was elected mayor in a nonpartisan contest, and supported changes to the city charter. By the beginning of the 21st century, Fort Worth was on its way to being one of the fastest-growing cities in the United States.

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ESB Professional // Shutterstock

#12. Jacksonville, FL: Lenny Curry

- Population of city in 2018: 903,889
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2015
- Term ends: 2019

Lenny Curry is a businessman who acted as chairman of the Republican Party of Florida, later winning the election to serve as Mayor of Jacksonville, Florida. Jacksonville is named after Andrew Jackson and has a consolidated government with Duval County. In recent years, Jacksonville has been hit with severe storms, including Hurricane Matthew and Hurricane Irma.

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LBJ Library // Flickr

#11. Austin, TX: Stephen Adler

- Population of city in 2018: 964,254
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2015
- Term ends: 2019

Steve Adler practiced law for 35 years and served in the Texas State Senate. As Mayor of Austin, Adler was the first mayor to be a part of the "10-1" city council system that was then newly established, with the city going from six council members representing the city at-large to 10 members representing different geographic locations.

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Anthony Quintano // Wikimedia Commons

#10. San Jose, CA: Sam Liccardo

- Population of city in 2018: 1,030,119
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2007
- Term ends: 2019

While serving on the City Council of San Jose, Sam Liccardo advocated for the construction of more high-rises in the city. In his first year in office as Mayor of San Jose, Liccardo guided negotiations on an agreement between all 11 employee unions in the city. During his tenure, technology companies such as Apple and Google have brought or pledged to bring campuses to North San Jose.

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Trong Nguyen // Shutterstock

#9. Dallas, TX: Eric Johnson

- Population of city in 2018: 1,345,047
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2019
- Term ends: 2023

Eric Johnson was elected Mayor of Dallas in June 2019, becoming the second African-American mayor of the Texas city. Before taking that office, Johnson served in the Texas House of Representatives starting in 2010, acting as Chairman of the Young Texans Legislative Caucus. Johnson is now the mayor of one of the most diverse cities in the nation, in terms of ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#8. San Diego, CA: Kevin Faulconer

- Population of city in 2018: 1,425,976
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Republican
- Took office in: 2014
- Term ends: 2020

Kevin Faulconer held a leadership position while serving in the San Diego City Council and won a special election for the office of mayor. After winning a full term in 2016, Faulconer made efforts to reduce homelessness in the city and supported a pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants. Unfortunately for sports fans, Faulconer’s efforts to keep the NFL team the Chargers in San Diego were unsuccessful, and the team moved to Los Angeles.

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Olivia Mendoza // JBSA

#7. San Antonio, TX: Ron Nirenberg

- Population of city in 2018: 1,532,233
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Independent
- Took office in: 2017
- Term ends: 2019

Formerly from the San Antonio City Council, Ron Nirenberg defeated incumbent Mayor Ivy Taylor in a 2017 election, becoming the first person to defeat an incumbent for that office in 20 years. Nirenberg described his political philosophy as one that prioritizes “responsive, equitable and limited government.” San Antonio is part of the “Texas Triangle,” along with Houston, Dallas, and Austin.

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Philadelphia City Council // Flickr

#6. Philadelphia, PA: James Kenney

- Population of city in 2018: 1,584,138
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2016
- Term ends: 2020

James Kenney was a councilman at-large for the Philadelphia City Council, and now serves as the mayor of the city. Kenney proposed a tax for sugary drinks, and supports supervised injection sites to combat the opioid epidemic. A Democrat, Kenney has feuded with the likes of former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie and President Donald Trump.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#5. Phoenix, AZ: Kate Gallego

- Population of city in 2018: 1,660,272
- Government type: Council-manager
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2019
- Term ends: 2023

At age 37, Kate Gallego is the youngest mayor of the ten largest cities in the United States. Gallego only recently took office, and before her election served in the Phoenix City Council. The city of Phoenix has overall been experiencing growth in its metropolitan area, with the crime rate also decreasing.

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New America // Flickr

#4. Houston, TX: Sylvester Turner

- Population of city in 2018: 2,325,502
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2016
- Term ends: 2020

Former Texas House of Representatives member Sylvester Turner lost two elections for Mayor of Houston in 1991 and 2003, before finally getting elected to the office in 2015. After Hurricane Harvey hit Houston, Turner was criticized for not suggesting evacuation to the public. Turner supports gay rights, consumer protections, and the Affordable Care Act.

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MacLean Center // Wikimedia Commons

#3. Chicago, IL: Lori Lightfoot

- Population of city in 2018: 2,705,994
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2019
- Term ends: 2023

Lori Lightfoot made history upon her election as Mayor of Chicago as the first black woman and first openly gay mayor of the city. Before becoming mayor, Lightfoot was the president of the Chicago Police Board and chair of the Chicago Police Accountability Task Force. Since taking office, Lightfoot has been challenged on issues involving public safety and community policing.

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Eric Garcetti // Wikimedia Commons

#2. Los Angeles, CA: Eric Garcetti

- Population of city in 2018: 3,990,456
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2013
- Term ends: 2022

Los Angeles is the largest city in the West Coast of the United States; it is technically a charter city with 15 city council districts. The current mayor is Eric Garcetti, the first Jewish mayor and the second consecutive Mexican-American mayor of the city. Garcetti has had an agenda described as both progressive and libertarian, receiving criticism from liberals and conservatives alike, but he still remains popular within Californian political circles.

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The office of Public Advocate for the City of New York // Wikimedia Commons

#1. New York, NY: Bill de Blasio

- Population of city in 2018: 8,398,748
- Government type: Strong mayor
- Mayor's party affiliation: Democratic
- Took office in: 2014
- Term ends: 2022

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has been one of the more socially progressive mayors of the nation’s largest city, bringing attention to income inequality. With his shaky relations with the New York Police Department, de Blasio has overall mixed approval rates from New York City residents. Despite this, de Blasio is running in the crowded Democratic primary for the 2020 presidential election.

2018 All rights reserved.