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Most and least popular senators in America

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Pixabay

Most and least popular senators in America

The Senate is one of the key instruments of the “checks and balances” that serve as the function of the federal government. Giving advice and consent to the executive branch of the government—i.e. the White House—senators are responsible for passing laws, treaties, and nominations put forward by the president of the United States. As such, their votes and actions have had an immense impact on American society and history. Each state in the union has two senators with six-year terms and no term limits.

In an era of prevalent polling and political chatter, American senators are under fire now more than ever. With no limits for how many terms they can serve, some senators have been in the chamber for an entire lifetime—while some are simply serving to fill a short vacancy. These days, the 100 senators comprising the upper house of the United States Congress are arguably under more scrutiny by American citizens and the press since the nation's founding. Never before has the public had so much unfiltered access to the details of a senator's leadership, from off-the-cuff comments to their personal lives. Because of this, senators' approval ratings today tell much more about the person behind them than the political makeup of the states they represent.

These members of Congress increasingly find themselves in precarious positions as everything they say is shared wide and far across social media, the internet, cable news, radio, and print. Their actions, words, and legislative records matter more and can represent serious advantages or disadvantages to them in an election year—the next of which will take place in 2020.

To determine how popular each American senator is, Stacker pored over survey data from Morning Consult. The global tech company distributed 472,802 surveys to registered U.S. voters across all 50 states from Jan. 1 to March 31, 2019 (data last updated April 2019), in order to determine approval ratings of all current 100 United States senators. Respondents could answer each question with “strongly approve,” “somewhat approve,” “somewhat disapprove,” “strongly disapprove,” or “don't know / no opinion.” Respondents were only surveyed on the senators they were assigned to based on their states of residence.

In this gallery, U.S. senators are ranked from least popular to most. In cases of a tie, the senator with the lower “never heard of” rating takes the lower rank. Keep reading to find out how your state senators are seen through the public eye.

You may also like: Most and least popular governors in America

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#100. Bob Menendez

- Approval rating: 33%
- Never heard of: 24%
- Disapproval rating: 43%
- State: New Jersey
- Party: Democrat

Despite being long-tenured on Congress, Bob Menendez of New Jersey went through some legal trouble in 2015 when he was indicted for corruption charges. While those charges were eventually dropped after a hung jury and mistrial, Menendez is the least popular senator in the country despite winning reelection in 2018. Most recently, the senator introduced legislation that would ban gun silencers.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#99. Gary Peters

- Approval rating: 33%
- Never heard of: 43%
- Disapproval rating: 23%
- State: Michigan
- Party: Democrat

Since becoming a senator in 2014, Gary Peters is still working on his name recognition. He previously served three terms in the House of Representatives and was one of many legislators working with the Obama Administration to gain debt forgiveness for Chrysler during the Great Recession. With his significant unpopularity in Michigan, Peters is especially vulnerable to his main competition in 2020, Republican and Army veteran John James.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#98. Thom Tillis

- Approval rating: 34%
- Never heard of: 33%
- Disapproval rating: 33%
- State: North Carolina
- Party: Republican

North Carolina Republican Thom Tillis has received criticism from the political right wing for breaking with President Donald Trump on occasion during his first term. Nevertheless, the president on June 25 endorsed Tillis' upcoming bid for reelection, which stands to be a nail-biter as the unpopular senator squares off with the likes of Army Reserve counsel Calvin Cunningham III, a Democrat.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#97. Martha McSally

- Approval rating: 35%
- Never heard of: 30%
- Disapproval rating: 35%
- State: Arizona
- Party: Republican

Martha McSally's ascension to the Senate is a strange case. The former congresswoman lost to Democratic opponent Kyrsten Sinema in 2018, but gained the other Senate seat for Arizona after Sen. Jon Kyl stepped down and Republican Gov. Doug Ducey appointed McSally to the role. McSally opened up during a Senate hearing about being raped by a superior officer during her time in the Air Force.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#96. Cory Gardner

- Approval rating: 35%
- Never heard of: 30%
- Disapproval rating: 35%
- State: Colorado
- Party: Republican

Cory Gardner narrowly defeated the Democratic incumbent in 2014 to become senator there, and today is the only Republican serving Colorado in a statewide elected office. Gardner in June 2019 introduced a bill that would allow the U.S. State Department to pay hackers a bounty for finding bugs in their computer systems.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#95. Pat Roberts

- Approval rating: 35%
- Never heard of: 31%
- Disapproval rating: 34%
- State: Kansas
- Party: Republican

Pat Roberts serving in Congress for 15 years before being elected to the Senate in 1996. He acted as a senior member of the Senate Armed Services Committee at the beginning of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Now into his 80s, Roberts will not run for an additional term.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#94. Mitch McConnell

- Approval rating: 36%
- Never heard of: 14%
- Disapproval rating: 50%
- State: Kentucky
- Party: Republican

Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell is arguably the most well-known senator in the country, given his status as the Senate Majority Leader and as one of the most controversial (and least popular) legislators currently serving. McConnell is especially criticized for blocking President Barack Obama's nomination of Merrick Garland to the Supreme Court while leading a record number of judicial appointments under the Trump administration. A more recent headline involves the growing pressure on McConnell to move forward with a bill that would benefit 9/11 first responders.

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Jeff McEvoy/U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#93. Dick Durbin

- Approval rating: 37%
- Never heard of: 28%
- Disapproval rating: 35%
- State: Illinois
- Party: Democrat

Dick Durbin is a prominent liberal in the Senate who serves as the House Minority Whip under Chuck Schumer. Durbin recently expressed regret voting for the 1994 crime bill, a piece of legislation under scrutiny during the Democratic presidential primaries.

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Rebecca Hammel/ U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#92. Josh Hawley

- Approval rating: 37%
- Never heard of: 34%
- Disapproval rating: 30%
- State: Missouri
- Party: Republican

The youngest person currently serving in the United States Senate was previously the attorney general of Missouri, defeating incumbent Claire McCaskill in a 2018 election. Hawley introduced legislation aiming to fight against perceived “online bias” against Republicans from tech companies, receiving much criticism and ridicule.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#91. Jerry Moran

- Approval rating: 37%
- Never heard of: 35%
- Disapproval rating: 28%
- State: Kansas
- Party: Republican

Sen. Jerry Moran entered the Senate in 2010 as the successor to Sam Brownback, who was elected governor of Kansas. During his service, Moran acted as chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, leading the Republican Party to a net gain of seats that led to the Senate's majority after the 2014 elections. In June he was the sole senator from Missouri or Kansas to support blocking President Donald Trump from selling munitions to Saudi Arabia.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#90. Cindy Hyde-Smith

- Approval rating: 38%
- Never heard of: 25%
- Disapproval rating: 37%
- State: Mississippi
- Party: Republican

Cindy Hyde-Smith was a registered Democrat while serving in the Mississippi State Senate, but switched parties based on what she called her conservative beliefs. Smith made a controversial joke about public hangings during her electoral campaign, though she still won the race to succeed Sen. Thad Cochran. In June 2019 she joined with U.S. Senators Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.), Kevin Cramer (R-N.D.), Steve Daines (R-Mont.), and Joni Ernst (R-Iowa) to draft the Protecting Life and Taxpayers Act, which would prohibit the use of taxpayer dollars for any abortion-related service.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#89. Roy Blunt

- Approval rating: 38%
- Never heard of: 28%
- Disapproval rating: 35%
- State: Missouri
- Party: Republican

Sen. Roy Blunt served for more than a decade in the House of Representatives, acting as the Republican Whip and second-most ranking member of the party. He was elected to the Senate in 2010. Since then, Blunt has been known for his conservative voting record.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#88. Pat Toomey

- Approval rating: 38%
- Never heard of: 29%
- Disapproval rating: 33%
- State: Pennsylvania
- Party: Republican

Pat Toomey narrowly defeated then-fellow Congressman Joe Sestak in 2010, succeeding Arlen Specter, who switched from the Republican Party to the Democratic Party, and lost to Sestak in a primary. Toomey has been criticized by his constituents for never holding an in-person town hall while in office. Toomey has been a vocal critic of President Trump's tariffs, saying they will serve to all but undo tax reforms made during the last four years by essentially raising consumer prices on the public.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#87. Dan Sullivan

- Approval rating: 38%
- Never heard of: 30%
- Disapproval rating: 32%
- State: Alaska
- Party: Republican

Before becoming senator in 2015, Dan Sullivan was long-involved in Alaskan politics and served in Washington D.C. under the Bush Administration. Sullivan today acts as an advocate against military action toward Iran while supporting sanctions against the country. He later amended that stance to say he would support military action if any American troops are killed.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#86. Richard Burr

- Approval rating: 38%
- Never heard of: 31%
- Disapproval rating: 31%
- State: North Carolina
- Party: Republican

Richard Burr of North Carolina has been the chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee since 2015, and as such has had an active role in the probe investigating Russian interference in United States elections. Burr was reported in 2019 to have briefed the Trump White House about the FBI investigation. In June 2019, He caused an uproar with an op-ed in the Charlotte Observer that castigated the Cherokee tribe and people—as well as bipartisan North Carolina General Assembly members—for their opposition to his Lumbee recognition bill Catawba off-reservation casino bill.

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Rebecca Hammel/ U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#85. Catherine Cortez-Masto

- Approval rating: 38%
- Never heard of: 32%
- Disapproval rating: 31%
- State: Nevada
- Party: Democrat

Not only is Catherine Cortez-Masto the first woman senator of Nevada, but she is the first Latina elected to serve in the Senate. As such, Cortez-Masto has been vocal toward the current Democratic candidates, encouraging them to earn Latino votes in the state. She introduced legislation in June 2019, along with fellow senators, seeking to expand health care tax credit eligibility.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#84. Ron Johnson

- Approval rating: 39%
- Never heard of: 29%
- Disapproval rating: 33%
- State: Wisconsin
- Party: Republican

Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin had not held office prior to his election to the Senate, being a CEO for a plastics and manufacturing company beforehand. In the Senate, Johnson has been active and vocal about illegal crossings through the southern border.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#83. Martin Heinrich

- Approval rating: 39%
- Never heard of: 29%
- Disapproval rating: 32%
- State: New Mexico
- Party: Democrat

After serving in the House of Representatives, Martin Heinrich was elected to the Senate in 2012. He made headlines in 2014 when he went on a six-day long “bipartisan survival trip” with then-Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake. In June 2019 he joined with four other senators to introduce the Renewable Electricity Standard Act of 2019, which seeks to protect against climate change and curb climate pollution.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#82. Jacky Rosen

- Approval rating: 39%
- Never heard of: 30%
- Disapproval rating: 32%
- State: Nevada
- Party: Democrat

As a congresswoman, Jacky Rosen had the distinction of being the only Democrat to defeat a Republican incumbent during the 2018 elections. She served just one term in the House before being elected to the Senate, signaling her political career may well be on track to continue gaining. She was recognized in June for her contributions to Nevada politics by Emerge Nevada, a group that grooms Democratic women for public office.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#81. Tom Udall

- Approval rating: 39%
- Never heard of: 30%
- Disapproval rating: 31%
- State: New Mexico
- Party: Democrat

Part of the Udall political family, New Mexico Sen. Tom Udall served in both the Senate and the House of Representatives beforehand alongside his cousin Mark Udall. He would be up for a third term in 2020, but Udall chose not to seek reelection.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#80. Rob Portman

- Approval rating: 39%
- Never heard of: 33%
- Disapproval rating: 28%
- State: Ohio
- Party: Republican

Before his election as one of Ohio's senators, Rob Portman served as a Congressman, trade representative, and later the director of the Office of Management and Budget under then-President George W. Bush. Portman has throughout his senatorial tenure been speculated as a potential vice presidential pick in 2012 and a presidential contender in 2016. Neither came to pass. The Republican has recently been critical of President Trump's discussion of tariffs imposed on Mexico, however, he supports the president's tariffs on China.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#79. Michael Bennet

- Approval rating: 39%
- Never heard of: 34%
- Disapproval rating: 28%
- State: Colorado
- Party: Democrat

Initially appointed to fill a vacancy in the Senate, the former superintendent of the Denver public school system won a term in his own right in 2010. Recently, Bennet made headlines for a loud 25-minute long speech condemning Sen. Ted Cruz, fighting back prostate cancer, and his 2020 campaign for the presidency.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#78. Todd Young

- Approval rating: 39%
- Never heard of: 37%
- Disapproval rating: 25%
- State: Indiana
- Party: Republican

Todd Young is a former U.S. Marine captain who served in the House of Representatives before joining the Senate. His record in the Senate has been observed as one supportive of bipartisan legislation—which shows by his support of disaster relief for farmers, and getting medical care for 9/11 first responders (though he stopped short of co-sponsoring a bill doing just that).

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#77. Joni Ernst

- Approval rating: 40%
- Never heard of: 23%
- Disapproval rating: 37%
- State: Iowa
- Party: Republican

Sen. Joni Ernst retired from the Iowa Army National Guard in 2015 with the rank of lieutenant colonel, then becoming the first woman to represent Iowa in the U.S. Congress. Ernst received controversy and criticism over her support of Iowa Congressman Steve King, who has been rebuked by several of his peers recently due to perceived racist rhetoric. In 2019, Ernst finally joined his colleagues in condemning King.

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Renee Bouchard // Wikimedia Commons

#76. Doug Jones

- Approval rating: 40%
- Never heard of: 27%
- Disapproval rating: 34%
- State: Alabama
- Party: Democrat

Doug Jones became the first Democrat elected to the Alabama Senate in a quarter of a century when he defeated former Alabama Supreme Court Justice Roy Moore, who was accused of sexual misconduct, in a high-profile special election. During his time as a United States attorney, Jones prosecuted two members of the Ku Klux Klan for the 1963 16th Street Baptist Church bombing. Roy Moore is returning to the campaign trail in the hopes of unseating Jones; that playing field is already crowded with five other contenders as of June 26.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#75. Mike Braun

- Approval rating: 40%
- Never heard of: 33%
- Disapproval rating: 27%
- State: Indiana
- Party: Republican

Running as an “outsider” candidate and touting his business career, Mike Braun defeated two Congressmen in the Republican primary for the Indiana Senatorial election in 2018. Braun opposes the DREAM Act and has been vocal about his support for a border wall.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#74. Rand Paul

- Approval rating: 41%
- Never heard of: 21%
- Disapproval rating: 38%
- State: Kentucky
- Party: Republican

The son of former Texas Congressman Ron Paul, Rand Paul won a seat in the Senate in 2010 after practicing as a physician in Kentucky. Like his father before him, Paul ran for the presidency in 2016, ultimately dropping out after a poor showing in the Iowa caucuses. Paul has been a critic of U.S. interventionism, warning against rising tensions against Iran under the Trump administration.

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Renee Bouchard // Wikimedia Commons

#73. Tammy Duckworth

- Approval rating: 41%
- Never heard of: 28%
- Disapproval rating: 31%
- State: Illinois
- Party: Democrat

The first Thai-American woman elected to Congress, then-Congresswoman Tammy Duckworth defeated incumbent Mark Kirk in a 2016 senatorial election. Duckworth is a veteran of the Iraq War, serving in the Army as a helicopter pilot, and lost both of her legs from combat wounds. Duckworth was the first senator to give birth while in office, leading to a rule change that allows her to bring her child to the Senate floor.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#72. James Inhofe

- Approval rating: 41%
- Never heard of: 31%
- Disapproval rating: 29%
- State: Oklahoma
- Party: Republican

Jim Inhofe's political experience includes acting as the mayor of Tulsa and as a U.S. Congressman and has been in the Senate since 1994. Inhofe is outspoken about his denial of climate change and has been a fierce opponent of LGBTQ+ rights.

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United States Congress // Wikimedia Commons

#71. James Lankford

- Approval rating: 41%
- Never heard of: 33%
- Disapproval rating: 26%
- State: Oklahoma
- Party: Republican

Prior to his congressional career, James Lankford worked as the program director of Falls Creek, which is the largest Christian camp in the country. Due to his opposition on legislation that supports LGBTQ+ rights, the Human Rights Campaign included Lankford in their “Congressional Hall of Shame.”

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#70. John Isakson

- Approval rating: 41%
- Never heard of: 35%
- Disapproval rating: 24%
- State: Georgia
- Party: Republican

Johnny Isakson has long been involved in Georgia state politics and has served in both houses of the Georgia legislature. Isakson succeeded Newt Gingrich in the House of Representatives before being elected to the Senate with establishment support in 2004. Isakson has supported stronger border security and voted to uphold President Trump's declaration of a national emergency.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#69. Chuck Grassley

- Approval rating: 42%
- Never heard of: 20%
- Disapproval rating: 39%
- State: Iowa
- Party: Republican

As the most senior member of the Republican delegation to Congress, Chuck Grassley is the president pro tempore of the Senate—a mostly ceremonial position, but one that puts Grassley in the presidential line of succession. Grassley oversaw the controversial confirmation hearings for Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court and made divisive statements suggesting the workload of the Senate Judiciary Committee was too much for women.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#68. Rick Scott

- Approval rating: 42%
- Never heard of: 22%
- Disapproval rating: 35%
- State: Florida
- Party: Republican

After narrowly winning two straight elections to be governor of Florida, Rick Scott defeated long-serving Democratic incumbent Bill Nelson in a 2018 senatorial campaign that was close enough to trigger a recount. Scott supported Donald Trump's declaration of a national emergency at the border and called Nicolas Maduro's Venezuelan regime a “genocide.”

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#67. Kyrsten Sinema

- Approval rating: 42%
- Never heard of: 29%
- Disapproval rating: 29%
- State: Arizona
- Party: Democrat

Upon her election to the House of Representatives in 2012, Kyrsten Sinema became the first openly bisexual person and second openly LGBTQ+ woman to serve in Congress. Sinema succeeded retiring Republican Sen. Jeff Flake and became the first Democratic senator to serve Arizona since 1995. In a March 2019 vote, Sinema voted against the Green New Deal.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#66. John Cornyn

- Approval rating: 42%
- Never heard of: 33%
- Disapproval rating: 25%
- State: Texas
- Party: Republican

Texas Sen. John Cornyn was the second-highest ranking Republican in the Senate, serving as House Majority Whip to Mitch McConnell until 2019. Cornyn was instrumental in blocking President Obama's nomination of Merrick Garland to the Supreme Court. He was also a loud voice of support for Brett Kavanaugh after his controversial nomination to the Court.

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Lorie Shaull // Flickr

#65. Tina Smith

- Approval rating: 42%
- Never heard of: 33%
- Disapproval rating: 24%
- State: Minnesota
- Party: Democrat

While serving as the lieutenant governor of Minnesota, Tina Smith was appointed to the United States Senate to replace Al Franken, who resigned after allegations of sexual misconduct. Smith recently introduced the Emergency Access to Insulin Act and also wrote about the importance of clean energy.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#64. Lisa Murkowski

- Approval rating: 43%
- Never heard of: 21%
- Disapproval rating: 36%
- State: Alaska
- Party: Republican

A moderate Republican representing Alaska, Lisa Murkowski lost her primary election in 2010 only to win the general election as a write-in candidate. Murkowski was the lone Republican who voted against the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#63. Kevin Cramer

- Approval rating: 43%
- Never heard of: 23%
- Disapproval rating: 35%
- State: North Dakota
- Party: Republican

Kevin Cramer has chaired North Dakota Republican Party and served as House Representative for the state before his election to the Senate. Cramer has been a supporter of Donald Trump's agenda and called Christine Blasey Ford's allegations against Brett Kavanaugh “absurd.”

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#62. Dianne Feinstein

- Approval rating: 43%
- Never heard of: 22%
- Disapproval rating: 35%
- State: California
- Party: Democrat

Dianne Feinstein received the most popular votes of any U.S. Senate election in history in 2012. Previously serving with Barbara Boxer and now Kamala Harris, Feinstein's only Senate colleagues from the California delegation have been women. Feinstein in February was caught on camera lecturing children about her perspectives on the Green New Deal, saying, “There's no way to pay for it.”

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doe-oakridge // Flickr

#61. Marsha Blackburn

- Approval rating: 43%
- Never heard of: 24%
- Disapproval rating: 33%
- State: Tennessee
- Party: Republican

Marsha Blackburn is the first woman elected for the Senate from Tennessee, previously serving in the House of Representatives since 2003. As a supporter of Donald Trump, her 2018 campaign was arguably mobilized by the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, despite an endorsement from pop star Taylor Swift for her Democratic opponent.

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doe-oakridge // Wikimedia Commons

#60. Lamar Alexander

- Approval rating: 43%
- Never heard of: 28%
- Disapproval rating: 30%
- State: Tennessee
- Party: Republican

Lamar Alexander was the 45th governor of Tennessee, the president of the University of Tennessee, and the Secretary of Education under then-President George H.W. Bush. Alexander fell short of gaining leadership within Senate Republicans on a number of occasions. He will be retiring from the Senate and will not seek reelection in 2020.

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Rebecca Hammel/ U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#59. Kirsten Gillibrand

- Approval rating: 43%
- Never heard of: 27%
- Disapproval rating: 30%
- State: New York
- Party: Democrat

Appointed by then-New York Gov. David Paterson to replace Hillary Clinton, who left the White House to become secretary of state under Barack Obama, Kirsten Gillibrand was part of a highly publicized period in which the media speculated on who would take the seat. Previously having conservative views for a Democrat while in the House, Gillibrand has moved toward more progressive and liberal policies in the Senate. She is currently running for higher office as she seeks to unseat President Trump.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#58. Kamala Harris

- Approval rating: 43%
- Never heard of: 28%
- Disapproval rating: 29%
- State: California
- Party: Democrat

Kamala Harris's long career had her work at the San Francisco District Attorney's office before being elected district attorney herself. She was then elected attorney general for California, serving from 2011 to 2017 before being elected to the Senate. She is currently one of the top-tier Democratic candidates for president.

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Cliff // Flickr

#57. James Risch

- Approval rating: 43%
- Never heard of: 34%
- Disapproval rating: 23%
- State: Idaho
- Party: Republican

Jim Risch, then the lieutenant governor of Idaho, succeeded Larry Craig, who was accused of sexual misconduct in a widely publicized bathroom sting operation news story. Risch was one of several senators to introduce a bill proposing sanctions against Syria.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#56. Marco Rubio

- Approval rating: 44%
- Never heard of: 21%
- Disapproval rating: 35%
- State: Florida
- Party: Republican

As a young rising star in the Florida Republican Party, Marco Rubio went from the speaker of the house in the Florida House of Representatives to getting elected to the Senate over former Gov. Charlie Crist. Rubio followed up by being a top contender for the Republican nomination in the 2016 presidential election, ultimately dropping out after losing the primary for his own state of Florida to Donald Trump. Rubio then ran for reelection that same year, ultimately winning.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#55. Steve Daines

- Approval rating: 44%
- Never heard of: 26%
- Disapproval rating: 31%
- State: Montana
- Party: Republican

After serving one term as Montana's congressman, Steve Daines won a Senate race in 2014. While presiding over the Senate floor, Daines censured fellow Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who was reading a letter from Coretta Scott King thought to be impugning Sen. Jeff Sessions during his hearings to become attorney general.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#54. Bob Casey

- Approval rating: 44%
- Never heard of: 28%
- Disapproval rating: 29%
- State: Pennsylvania
- Party: Democrat

Bob Casey Jr., son of former Pennsylvania Gov. Bob Casey, is a pro-life Democrat like his father. Casey lost to Ed Rendell in the Democratic primary for governor of Pennsylvania, but with Rendell's backing, he defeated Rick Santorum in a Senatorial election in 2006. Since the election of Donald Trump to the presidency, Casey has been more outspoken on social media.

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Office of Senator Sherrod Brown // Wikimedia Commons

#53. Sherrod Brown

- Approval rating: 45%
- Never heard of: 27%
- Disapproval rating: 28%
- State: Ohio
- Party: Democrat

Sen. Sherrod Brown from Ohio is known as being one of the more progressive members of the Senate. Despite speculation that he would run for president in 2020, Brown declined to do so, electing to stay in the Senate instead.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#52. Roger Wicker

- Approval rating: 45%
- Never heard of: 27%
- Disapproval rating: 28%
- State: Mississippi
- Party: Republican

Sen. Roger Wicker was appointed to the Senate to replace Trent Lott after his resignation. Back in January 2015, Wicker was the only senator to vote against an amendment that declared that climate change was real and not a hoax.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#51. Mike Lee

- Approval rating: 45%
- Never heard of: 28%
- Disapproval rating: 27%
- State: Utah
- Party: Republican

Having conservative and libertarian views, Mike Lee was supported by the Tea Party in unseating the incumbent senator from Utah, a fellow Republican. Lee is vocal about his opposition to the Green New Deal, and in 2016 blocked a vote on federal assistance for Flint during the city's ongoing water crisis.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#50. Chris Van Hollen

- Approval rating: 45%
- Never heard of: 34%
- Disapproval rating: 21%
- State: Maryland
- Party: Democrat

Sen. Chris Van Hollen has been active in Democratic Congressional leadership, serving as the chair of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee during his time in the House and later the chair of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee after getting elected to the Senate. Van Hollen was the cosponsor of the Protect Our Elections Act, along with Maine Sen. Susan Collins.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#49. Joe Manchin

- Approval rating: 46%
- Never heard of: 13%
- Disapproval rating: 41%
- State: West Virginia
- Party: Democrat

Moderate Democrat Joe Manchin is the former governor of West Virginia, succeeding Robert Byrd after a 2010 special election. He's voted with and against both Democrats and Republicans on issues such as gun control and health care, leading to criticism from both sides. Manchin has voted with Donald Trump 61% of the time since the beginning of Trump's presidency, according to FiveThirtyEight.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#48. Richard Blumenthal

- Approval rating: 46%
- Never heard of: 18%
- Disapproval rating: 36%
- State: Connecticut
- Party: Democrat

Sen. Richard Blumenthal is currently the third wealthiest senator in Congress. The former attorney general of Connecticut has been vocal in pushing forward legislation for gun control: One of his most recently cosponsored bills proposed banning gun silencers. Trump has feuded with Blumenthal over the latter's claims that he served in Vietnam.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#47. Sheldon Whitehouse

- Approval rating: 46%
- Never heard of: 19%
- Disapproval rating: 35%
- State: Rhode Island
- Party: Democrat

During his tenure as senator, Sheldon Whitehouse attracted attention from PolitiFact regarding a claim that Paul Ryan's 2012 budget would get “rid of Medicare in 10 years.” Recently, Whitehouse stated his opposition to statehood for Washington D.C.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#46. Deb Fischer

- Approval rating: 46%
- Never heard of: 20%
- Disapproval rating: 34%
- State: Nebraska
- Party: Republican

Sen. Deb Fischer served on the unicameral and nonpartisan Nebraska Legislature before her election to the Senate. Fischer is for term limits in the Senate, and said that she would limit herself to two terms.

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USDA // Flickr

#45. Debbie Stabenow

- Approval rating: 46%
- Never heard of: 22%
- Disapproval rating: 33%
- State: Michigan
- Party: Democrat

Michigan's first female senator was previously a congresswoman for the state. Sen. Debbie Stabenow was one of several senators who opposed Donald Trump's aid cuts to Central America.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#44. Tim Kaine

- Approval rating: 46%
- Never heard of: 21%
- Disapproval rating: 33%
- State: Virginia
- Party: Democrat

Sen. Tim Kaine had a number of positions before his election to the Senate. He was the mayor of Richmond, lieutenant governor of Virginia, governor of Virginia, and the chair of the Democratic National Committee. He was also the running mate to Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election, with the pair losing to the Donald Trump-Mike Pence ticket in the electoral college.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#43. Jeff Merkley

- Approval rating: 46%
- Never heard of: 26%
- Disapproval rating: 28%
- State: Oregon
- Party: Democrat

Sen. Jeff Merkley is a leading progressive in the Senate who was the only senator to endorse his colleague Bernie Sanders for the Democratic nomination. Merkley received attention for filming his trip to an immigrant detention center, making a point that he was denied entry from viewing the conditions inside.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#42. Michael Crapo

- Approval rating: 46%
- Never heard of: 28%
- Disapproval rating: 26%
- State: Idaho
- Party: Republican

Sen. Mike Crapo is the first Mormon elected to the U.S. Senate and previously served on the Idaho House of Representatives and U.S. House of Representatives. He has comfortably won reelection many times since then, even receiving 99% of the vote in 2004. Crapo was against President Barack Obama making a Supreme Court appointment in 2016.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#41. Richard Shelby

- Approval rating: 46%
- Never heard of: 28%
- Disapproval rating: 25%
- State: Alabama
- Party: Republican

Known as a conservative Democrat while in the House of Representatives, Richard Shelby won a narrow race for the Senate in 1986. In 1994, Shelby switched from the Democratic Party to the Republican Party. Shelby has been a supporter of Donald Trump's agenda, including the border wall.

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USDA // Flickr

#40. John Boozman

- Approval rating: 46%
- Never heard of: 29%
- Disapproval rating: 25%
- State: Arkansas
- Party: Republican

Former Congressman John Boozman was the first Republican elected to the Senate for Arkansas since the Reconstruction era. Boozman is against government regulation for the environment from EPA. He was one of the 11 Republican senators to vote against Trump's intent to lift sanctions against Russian companies.

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NASA/Bill Ingalls // Wikimedia Commons

#39. Chuck Schumer

- Approval rating: 47%
- Never heard of: 18%
- Disapproval rating: 35%
- State: New York
- Party: Democrat

Succeeding Harry Reid from Nevada, Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York is currently the Senate Minority Leader and the top-ranking Democrat in the Senate. Known as a “publicity hound,” Schumer has found himself butting heads with Donald Trump in his role as the top Senate Democrat. Most recently, he displayed an image of the drowned bodies of a Salvadoran father and daughter who were attempting to reach the United States seeking asylum.

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U.S. Customs and Border Protection // Flickr

#38. Mazie Hirono

- Approval rating: 47%
- Never heard of: 19%
- Disapproval rating: 34%
- State: Hawaii
- Party: Democrat

Sen. Mazie Hirono is a Japanese-born senator representing the state of Hawaii. A non-practicing Buddhist, she is the first Asian American woman elected to the Senate. During the confirmation hearings of Brett Kavanaugh, Hirono was an outspoken supporter of Kavanaugh's accuser Christine Blasey Ford.

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New Jersey National Guard // Flickr

#37. Cory Booker

- Approval rating: 47%
- Never heard of: 20%
- Disapproval rating: 33%
- State: New Jersey
- Party: Democrat

The former mayor of Newark is one of just three black senators currently serving. Booker gained attention for his pointed questioning during the hearings for Brett Kavanaugh, receiving criticism from conservatives. Booker is one of several Democratic senators running in the crowded race to unseat President Trump.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#36. Patty Murray

- Approval rating: 47%
- Never heard of: 24%
- Disapproval rating: 29%
- State: Washington
- Party: Democrat

Sen. Patty Murray became Washington's first woman senator when she was elected to the position in 1992. She and former Congressman Paul Ryan in 2013 negotiated to create the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013. She is not up for reelection in 2020, but has leveraged her position as the ranking member of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor & Pensions to make health care a prominent issue for those running by increasing the amount of health care bills she introduces.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#35. David Perdue

- Approval rating: 47%
- Never heard of: 29%
- Disapproval rating: 25%
- State: Georgia
- Party: Republican

Working as a management consultant and holding executive positions in various companies such as Dollar General, David Perdue won a competitive election to the Senate in 2014. Perdue most recently has supported Trump's tariffs towards Mexico as a response to illegal immigration from the country.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#34. Bill Cassidy

- Approval rating: 47%
- Never heard of: 30%
- Disapproval rating: 24%
- State: Louisiana
- Party: Republican

Bill Cassidy won his election in 2014 during a Republican sweep that made him the first Republican senator from Louisiana since Reconstruction. Cassidy was one of the architects attempting to repeal Obamacare and appeared on “Jimmy Kimmel Live!” after the television host voiced criticism toward the attempt.

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Lacy Landre // Flickr

#33. Tammy Baldwin

- Approval rating: 48%
- Never heard of: 18%
- Disapproval rating: 35%
- State: Wisconsin
- Party: Democrat

Tammy Baldwin became the first openly gay woman to serve in Congress when she was elected in 2012. She was one of many senators who questioned the State Department for not recognizing June as Pride Month. On June 26, 2019, she introduced a resolution commemorating the Stonewall uprising that inspired the LGBTQ+ movement.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#32. Ted Cruz

- Approval rating: 48%
- Never heard of: 17%
- Disapproval rating: 35%
- State: Texas
- Party: Republican

One of the most controversial senators currently serving is Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, who was blamed for the government shutdown of 2013. Cruz was President Trump's closest rival in 2016 and initially declined to endorse Trump during his Republican National Convention speech. In 2018, Cruz narrowly defeated Democratic rising star Beto O'Rourke for reelection.

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United States Congress // Wikimedia Commons

#31. Shelley Capito

- Approval rating: 48%
- Never heard of: 22%
- Disapproval rating: 30%
- State: West Virginia
- Party: Republican

Shelley Moore Capito is the first woman to serve as senator of West Virginia. Today, she is one of Mitch McConnell's counsels. Despite criticizing Donald Trump during the 2016 campaign after the Access Hollywood tape leak, Capito did ultimately supported Trump's presidency.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#30. Mark Warner

- Approval rating: 48%
- Never heard of: 23%
- Disapproval rating: 29%
- State: Virginia
- Party: Democrat

Former Virginia Gov. Mark Warner defeated his gubernatorial predecessor Jim Gilmore in a 2008 election for the Senate. Warner gave the keynote speech during the 2008 Democratic National Convention. Warner is considered to be one of the most centrist and bipartisan Democrats in the Senate.

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USDA // Flickr

#29. Maria Cantwell

- Approval rating: 48%
- Never heard of: 23%
- Disapproval rating: 29%
- State: Washington
- Party: Democrat

Maria Cantwell is the second female senator from Washington after Patty Murray, whom she currently serves with. Cantwell is a strong advocate for reproductive rights and environmental protection. Before her election to the Senate in 2000, Cantwell served in the Washington House of Representatives and the U.S. House of Representatives.

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Michael Vadon // Flickr

#28. Tom Cotton

- Approval rating: 48%
- Never heard of: 23%
- Disapproval rating: 29%
- State: Arkansas
- Party: Republican

Tom Cotton served in Afghanistan and Iraq in the U.S. Army before being elected to the Senate at just 37 years old. Cotton was one of many Republican senators to block nominations from President Barack Obama, one such obstruction said to be motivated to “inflict special pain on the president.” Cotton has been mentioned as a possible nominee to Donald Trump's cabinet numerous times.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#27. Elizabeth Warren

- Approval rating: 49%
- Never heard of: 11%
- Disapproval rating: 40%
- State: Massachusetts
- Party: Democrat

Sen. Elizabeth Warren is a former law school professor who defeated Scott Brown in 2012. Her progressive values and detailed policy proposals have led her to become a frontrunner in the 2020 presidential campaign.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#26. Chris Murphy

- Approval rating: 49%
- Never heard of: 19%
- Disapproval rating: 32%
- State: Connecticut
- Party: Democrat

At the time of his election, Chris Murphy was the youngest member of the U.S. Senate. Before taking higher office, he served in both houses of the Connecticut General Assembly and served as a House member. Murphy is one of the most vocal senators on the issues of gun control, with the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School happening in his state.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#25. Jack Reed

- Approval rating: 49%
- Never heard of: 24%
- Disapproval rating: 27%
- State: Rhode Island
- Party: Democrat

Jack Reed served in the U.S. Army before being elected to the House of Representatives from 1991 to 1997. His efforts there were focused on education and health care. Reed has been in the Senate since 1997, and during the Obama administration rejected multiple offers to serve as the president's defense secretary.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#24. Ben Sasse

- Approval rating: 49%
- Never heard of: 24%
- Disapproval rating: 27%
- State: Nebraska
- Party: Republican

As a senator, Ben Sasse of Nebraska voted against legislation that would have prevented the government shutdown in February of 2019. Sasse is also a cosponsor of a resolution that would limit the number of Supreme Court justices to nine.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#23. John Kennedy

- Approval rating: 49%
- Never heard of: 28%
- Disapproval rating: 23%
- State: Louisiana
- Party: Republican

Unrelated to the Kennedy political family, John Kennedy of Louisiana is a former Democrat-turned-Republican. Kennedy has since been known for his “folksy” behavior and colloquialisms in the Senate. Kennedy mulled a run for governor of Louisiana, but ultimately decided to stay in the Senate. The senator's name was most recently in the news for walking back his May 28, 2019, comments urging Special Counsel Robert Mueller to testify publicly before Congress.

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U.S. Congress // Wikimedia Commons

#22. Jon Tester

- Approval rating: 50%
- Never heard of: 11%
- Disapproval rating: 38%
- State: Montana
- Party: Democrat

Jon Tester went from the Montana State Senate to the U.S. Senate upon winning his election in 2006. A moderate Democrat, he has voted with Trump on the issues around 34% of the time as of April 2019. He won a third term in 2018 with strong support from indigenous peoples and women.

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Renee Bouchard // Wikimedia Commons

#21. Maggie Hassan

- Approval rating: 50%
- Never heard of: 17%
- Disapproval rating: 33%
- State: New Hampshire
- Party: Democrat

After serving on the New Hampshire State Senate and as governor, Maggie Hassan defeated the Republican incumbent to become a U.S. senator. Her congressional office gained attention when one of her interns was caught yelling an expletive at President Donald Trump.

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Gage Skidmore // Wikimedia Commons

#20. Mitt Romney

- Approval rating: 50%
- Never heard of: 21%
- Disapproval rating: 29%
- State: Utah
- Party: Republican

The former governor of Massachusetts ran for president twice, losing to John McCain in the Republican primaries of 2008 and President Barack Obama in the 2012 general election. After sitting out of the 2016 election, Romney became a critic of Donald Trump, eventually moving back to Utah to run for Senate in 2018 and replacing Orrin Hatch.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#19. Ron Wyden

- Approval rating: 50%
- Never heard of: 24%
- Disapproval rating: 26%
- State: Oregon
- Party: Democrat

Ron Wyden has been a senator for Oregon since 1996 and previously served on the House of Representatives since 1981. Since Donald Trump became president, Wyden has been a fervent critic of the White House—from Trump's refusal to disclose tax returns to his appointment of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#18. Ben Cardin

- Approval rating: 50%
- Never heard of: 29%
- Disapproval rating: 22%
- State: Maryland
- Party: Democrat

Ben Cardin served as a Maryland congressman for two decades before comfortably winning three straight elections for senator, most recently in 2018. Cardin is thought to be one of the most liberal senators and often supported former President Barack Obama's agenda.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#17. Thomas Carper

- Approval rating: 51%
- Never heard of: 20%
- Disapproval rating: 30%
- State: Delaware
- Party: Democrat

Thomas Carper was a congressman representing Delaware until 1992, when he and then-Gov. Michael Castle (a Republican) swapped roles after winning their respective elections. Carper then won a seat in the Senate in 2000 against incumbent William Roth: a shakeup during a period when Delaware had the same four elected officials—Roth, Carper, Castle, and Joe Biden—for 16 years.

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Jared King//NNWO // Flickr

#16. Ed Markey

- Approval rating: 51%
- Never heard of: 27%
- Disapproval rating: 22%
- State: Massachusetts
- Party: Democrat

A long-tenured member of the House of Representatives, Ed Markey currently holds the seat formerly held by John Kerry. One of Markey's strategies to promote issues is by posting a number of letters he receives from constituents on his public website.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#15. Tim Scott

- Approval rating: 51%
- Never heard of: 28%
- Disapproval rating: 21%
- State: South Carolina
- Party: Republican

Tim Scott is one of three black senators currently serving in the United States and the lone person among the three to be a Republican. Scott has objected to some of Trump's judicial appointments, one case being for racist statements. Scott had a widely viewed speech about being profiled and targeted by Capitol Police.

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Medill DC // Flickr

#14. Susan Collins

- Approval rating: 52%
- Never heard of: 9%
- Disapproval rating: 39%
- State: Maine
- Party: Republican

Susan Collins, a self-described moderate Republican, has received attention for voting against her colleagues on a number of significant occasions. One example was her vote against repealing the Affordable Care Act, which received criticism from Republicans. During the Trump administration, Collins has voted with the Republicans at a higher frequency than in years prior and faces a fierce reelection battle in 2020. Moderates of both major parties, Libertarians, and Independents throughout that state have expressed frustration over Collins' lack of checks-and-balances on Trump, while Democrats around the U.S. see overthrowing Collins in Maine as a major step toward flipping the Senate in 2020. Collins, if she confirms her reelection bid, will be facing off against two primary challengers; followed by a showdown with Maine House Speaker Sara Gideon, who was endorsed by the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee and several national Democrats, as well as attorney Bre Kidman and Progressive activist Betsy Sweet.

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Michael Vadon // Wikimedia Commons

#13. Lindsey Graham

- Approval rating: 52%
- Never heard of: 16%
- Disapproval rating: 31%
- State: South Carolina
- Party: Republican

A friend of the late John McCain, Lindsey Graham has been in the public eye recently for his fervent support for President Donald Trump despite Graham's past condemnations of him. Graham loudly condemned Democrats during the hearings for Brett Kavanaugh and received scrutiny for encouraging Donald Trump Jr. to ignore a subpoena from the Senate Intelligence Committee. Graham is up for reelection in 2020.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#12. Chris Coons

- Approval rating: 52%
- Never heard of: 19%
- Disapproval rating: 29%
- State: Delaware
- Party: Democrat

Holding the Senate seat that former Vice President Joe Biden once held, Chris Coons defeated Christine O'Donnell in a highly publicized special election. Since then, Coons was one of several senators to introduce a bill protecting then-Special Counsel Robert Mueller. In June, Coons accused President Trump of fabricating the tariff tensions with Mexico for the sole reason of stoking his base supporters.

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AMSF2011 // Flickr

#11. Michael Enzi

- Approval rating: 52%
- Never heard of: 25%
- Disapproval rating: 23%
- State: Wyoming
- Party: Republican

The senior senator from Wyoming was a state legislator and working in the energy industry before his time in the Senate. He was ranked in 2007 as the sixth-most conservative senator in office at the time. Enzi will not seek a fifth term in 2020.

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Marc Nozell // Wikimedia Commons

#10. Jeanne Shaheen

- Approval rating: 53%
- Never heard of: 15%
- Disapproval rating: 32%
- State: New Hampshire
- Party: Democrat

Sen. Jeanne Shaheen lost to Republican John E. Sununu in a 2002 election, but won a rematch between the two in 2008. She has had a fairly liberal voting record regarding issues like gun rights, health care, and foreign policy. She's also up for reelection in 2020, when she'll go head-to-head with a former Army general as her Republican challenger.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#9. Brian Schatz

- Approval rating: 53%
- Never heard of: 23%
- Disapproval rating: 25%
- State: Hawaii
- Party: Democrat

Then-Lt. Gov. Brian Schatz was appointed to the Senate after the death of long-serving Sen. Daniel Inouye of Hawaii. Schatz has been characterized as an influential progressive despite keeping a low profile publicly. Following reports of unsanitary and food-deprived conditions at facilities holding migrant children, Schatz on June 26 led a group calling for the investigation of contractors at those facilities; the same day reports came out of a Senate Democrats' Special Committee on the Climate Crisis, comprised of 10 Democrats including Schatz.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#8. John Thune

- Approval rating: 55%
- Never heard of: 14%
- Disapproval rating: 31%
- State: South Dakota
- Party: Republican

Sen. John Thune beat Tom Daschle, then-Senate Minority Leader for the Democrats, in a surprise upset in 2004. Since then, Sen. Thune has risen in the ranks among Senate Republicans. In the current Congress, Thune is the Senate Majority Whip, making him the second-highest ranking senator in the Republican Party.

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Joy Holder/U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#7. John Hoeven

- Approval rating: 55%
- Never heard of: 23%
- Disapproval rating: 22%
- State: North Dakota
- Party: Republican

Sen. John Hoeven is one of the wealthiest senators currently serving the U.S. Senate, yet does not falter in connecting with the public he represents. The former banker also held the office of governor. He recently encouraged the federal use of drones for fighting wildfires. As chairman of the Senate Agriculture Appropriations Committee, Hoeven on June 26 announced the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development awarded water infrastructure grants and loans to North Dakota cities Medina ($537,000 grant, $668,000 loan for replacing water mains and fire hydrants and water and sewer improvements) and LaMoure ($803,000 grant, $997,000 loan for water tower removal and new concrete tank for LaMoure's water supply).

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United States Congress // Wikimedia Commons

#6. Mike Rounds

- Approval rating: 56%
- Never heard of: 16%
- Disapproval rating: 28%
- State: South Dakota
- Party: Republican

A senator from South Dakota since 2015, Mike Rounds was previously the state's governor from 2003 to 2011. Rounds was one of the senators urging President Donald Trump to withdraw from the Paris Agreement and supported embattled EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#5. John Barrasso

- Approval rating: 56%
- Never heard of: 18%
- Disapproval rating: 26%
- State: Wyoming
- Party: Republican

John Barrasso was appointed to the Senate after the death of Craig L. Thomas. Barrasso has had a conservative record and currently serves as Senate Republican Conference chairman. Barrasso has allied himself with Trump in his growing concern over relations with Iran.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#4. Angus King

- Approval rating: 58%
- Never heard of: 13%
- Disapproval rating: 29%
- State: Maine
- Party: Independent

Sen. Angus King was a popular governor before being elected to the Senate in 2012. Since then, King has aligned himself more frequently with Democrats than Republicans, caucusing with the party. King recently warned about the growing tensions between Iran and the United States. He also made the news for taking a road trip with four strangers after a flight of his was canceled.

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U.S. Senate // Wikimedia Commons

#3. Amy Klobuchar

- Approval rating: 58%
- Never heard of: 16%
- Disapproval rating: 26%
- State: Minnesota
- Party: Democrat

Sen. Amy Klobuchar is now known around the country after launching her 2020 bid for the presidency. She was the first elected female senator for Minnesota, previously having served as a county lawyer. Klobuchar is known for her questions during the confirmation hearings of Brett Kavanaugh, but also gained infamy for an aggressive and supposedly abusive environment as a boss in her congressional office.

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U.S. Department of State // Flickr

#2. Patrick Leahy

- Approval rating: 59%
- Never heard of: 14%
- Disapproval rating: 28%
- State: Vermont
- Party: Democrat

Patrick Leahy is the most senior member of the Senate and only sitting member to have been serving since the Gerald Ford administration. During the Trump administration, Leahy has been active in foreign affairs and the FBI investigation on Trump. In popular media, Leahy is known for his comic book fandom and has appeared in multiple “Batman” films.

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Gage Skidmore // Flickr

#1. Bernie Sanders

- Approval rating: 62%
- Never heard of: 7%
- Disapproval rating: 31%
- State: Vermont
- Party: Independent

The former mayor of Burlington and former congressman representing Vermont is also possibly the most well-known senator in the country. Sen. Bernie Sanders significantly raised his national profile as the primary rival to Hillary Clinton in the 2016 Democratic primary for the presidency. An independent member of the Senate and self-identified Democratic Socialist, Sanders is once again running for president for the 2020 election. He recently released his plan to eliminate all student debt.

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