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States with the most severe summer weather

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Pixabay

States with the most severe summer weather

With summer weather comes the sun, more daylight, and rumbling midday thunderstorms, but occasionally the scales tip toward the extreme. And as the planet continues to get warmer every year, expect the dog days of summer to bring more weird weather phenomenons previously considered as once-in-a-lifetime storms.

The number of heat waves has been steadily increasing, with the number of hot spells tripling the long-term average as recently as 2011 and 2012. The amount of heavy torrential downpours has also been rising, especially since 1991. In some regions, including the Northeast, Midwest, and Great Plains, downpours are over 30% above the 1901-1960 average. Since warm air contains more water vapor than cold air, excess moisture finds its way into storm systems, causing more torrential rain.

Climate change exacerbates weirder-than-normal weather, interfering with ocean currents, lending extra heat to tornadoes, extending droughts, and intensifying flooding. In 2011, four out of five Americans claimed to have experienced extreme weather, while more than a third experienced personal harm from natural disasters.

Still, certain spots in the United States are more favorable to summer storms than others. While Miami might be a warm refuge in the winter, its summer heat and humidity are almost unbearable, and the city ranks nine out of the top 10 cities most likely to be hit by a tropical storm or hurricane. Meteorologists also recommend avoiding New Orleans, Dallas, Mobile, and Corpus Christi during the summer months.

Using April 2019 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Storm Events Database, Stacker ranked each state—besides the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico—by the total property damage because of summer weather occurrences from 2009 to 2018. It classified a summer weather event if it happened in June, July, August, or September.

Read on to find out which states are right in the storm's eye.

You may also like: 20 safety preparations for the weather this summer

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IFCAR // Wikimedia Commons

#52. District of Columbia

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $257,800
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $0.37 (#2 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2011 tropical storm in District Of Columbia ($2 million in property damage)

Hurricane Irene was the costliest weather event in the nation's capital, bringing wind speeds of 60 miles per hour to Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport and drenching the city in more than 4 inches of rain when the storm hit in August 2011. Although the hurricane was downgraded to a tropical storm by the time it reached Washington D.C., the city's suburbs were battered with hurricane-force winds. Gusts in Maryland's Calvert County peaked at 72 miles per hour.

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Olga Enger // Shutterstock

#51. Rhode Island

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $414,850
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $0.39 (#3 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2013 flash flood in Providence ($2 million in property damage)

Flash floods are the most prevalent weather hazard in New England, and Rhode Island was hit with several damaging downpours in the last decade. Locals refer to a vengeful spring flood as “The Great Flood of 2010,” which was caused by a series of heavy rainfalls in March and April that ended with a storm that brought six to 10 inches of rain to the state, killing one person and resulting in a major disaster declaration.

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Landonksmith // Shutterstock

#50. Delaware

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $487,554
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $0.50 (#4 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2009 thunderstorm wind in New Castle ($1 million in property damage)

A thunderstorm struck New Castle County in Delaware on Aug. 9, 2009, as the result of a northward-moving warm front that plagued the area with storms for the entire day. Approximately 17,500 customers across the Delmarva Peninsula lost power because of the storm, especially impacting the towns of Elsmere and Hockessin. Uprooted trees reportedly damaged homes in Newark and Wilmington.

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Uheheu // Shutterstock

#49. Hawaii

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $973,900
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $0.69 (#6 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2018 flash flood in Hawaii ($7 million in property damage)

Hawaii was hit with a rare hurricane in August 2018, soaking the island chain with 52 inches of rain—the second-highest total rainfall from a tropical cyclone in the United States since 1950. Hurricane Lane hammered Hawaii's Big Island the hardest, forcing residents in Hilo and Keaau to evacuate. Flooding and landslides closed several roads, and emergency officials performed many water rescues to usher Hawaiians to safety.

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Jennifer Mae Kilby // Shutterstock

#48. Maine

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $1.5 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $1.09 (#11 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2009 lightning in Lincoln ($2 million in property damage)

On July 2, 2009, a bolt of lightning struck the window frame of a home in Nobleboro and would eventually level the house. Officials say sparks likely entered the home's electrical system, causing the worst summer weather damage in the state's recent memory. Within minutes, the $1.5 million home was swallowed by flames, and firefighters from 12 surrounding towns spent 13 hours battling the blaze. Thankfully, no one was seriously hurt.

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Oregon Department of Transportation // Wikimedia Commons

#47. Oregon

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $1.5 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $0.36 (#1 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2013 strong wind in Greater Portland Metro Area ($8 million in property damage)

The remnants of a Pacific typhoon are to blame for Oregon's worst summer weather, resulting in a soggy September 2013 that drenched Astoria in over 10 inches of rain and Portland in more than six inches. The National Weather Service issued a high-wind warning in parts of the state, predicting gusts up to 50 miles per hour. Over 15,000 residents in Multnomah County lost power, while 8,000 people in Sherwood were also left in the dark.

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RGesualdi // Pixabay

#46. Alabama

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $2.6 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $0.52 (#5 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2012 thunderstorm wind in Lawrence ($3 million in property damage)

Severe thunderstorms struck northeast Alabama on July 5, 2012, producing a macroburst of wind damage that uprooted trees and downed power lines. The town of Moulton felt the brunt of the storm's destruction, completely flattening a building and farm equipment in the greater Lawrence County. The roof covering of a high school gym was also blown off by the storm, and several windows were broken, causing devastating water damage.

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Renee Foskett // Shutterstock

#45. Alaska

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $4.3 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $5.84 (#24 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2012 flood in Susitna Valley ($10 million in property damage)

A weeklong rainstorm in southern Alaska overflowed many rivers in Susitna Valley, causing the worst flooding some residents reported seeing in 30 years. Flooding destroyed more than a dozen homes, damaged 800 structures, and forced the closure of roads, prompting residents of Talkeetna to evacuate. On Sept. 29, the rain turned to snow, arriving almost a month earlier than the region's usual first snowfall.

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S.C. Air National Guard // Flickr

#44. South Carolina

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $4.3 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $0.85 (#7 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2018 tropical storm in Marion ($3 million in property damage)

Slow-moving Hurricane Florence continued to drench the Carolina coast in rain 12 days after it first made landfall in September 2018 in South Carolina. In the city of Georgetown, some homes were surrounded by as much as six feet of water as the Waccamaw River crested at over 17.9 feet high, outdoing previous records. In total, the storm caused 36 fatalities in the state.

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William Hayes // Pixabay

#43. New Hampshire

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $5.1 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $3.79 (#21 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2011 flash flood in Coos ($7 million in property damage)

As Tropical Storm Irene made its way up the East Coast in the summer of 2011, it brought destruction with it, closing over 275 roads in New Hampshire because of dangerous flooding. In Portsmouth, wind gusts reached 63 miles per hour, taking down trees and power lines, resulting in blackouts for 165,000 homes and businesses. The storm caused a dam in Campton to overflow, forcing some evacuations for residents.

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Knumina Studios // Shutterstock

#42. Maryland

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $5.6 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $0.93 (#8 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2016 flash flood in Howard ($22 million in property damage)

A July 30, 2016 flash flood delivered torrential downpours to historic Ellicott City in Maryland, impacting hundreds of cars, destroying buildings, and causing two deaths. The city received over six inches of rain in just 90 minutes. The Patapsco River swelled over 13 feet during the storm, exceeding records and even washing away the town's flood marker pole. The probability of the catastrophic flood was measured to be one in 1,000, but Ellicott City was hit with another deadly flood the following summer.

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greg westfall // Flickr

#41. Wyoming

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $6.3 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $10.86 (#16 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2010 flood in Fremont ($12 million in property damage)

Parts of Wyoming were inundated with floodwaters in June 2010 after unseasonably late heavy snowfall was followed by a series of days with warm temperatures. May 2010 clocked in as the third coldest month for the town of Riverton in at least 100 years, but the climate couldn't keep up with spring's late arrival, completely closing a bridge in Lander and damaging 38 homes in the span of 32 miles.

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Tony Campbell // Shutterstock

#40. Indiana

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $6.7 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $1.01 (#10 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2014 flash flood in Porter ($10 million in property damage)

Flash floods deposited nearly a foot of rain in northern Indiana during the summer of 2014, causing one school district to close and forcing vehicles off of major roads. Emergency officials had to rescue 18 people who had become stranded in the rising water. Two grain bins in Tippecanoe County were knocked from their foundations, while an old grain silo collapsed because of the storms.

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Melissa Brandes // Shutterstock

#39. Missouri

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $9 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $1.48 (#12 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2013 flash flood in Pulaski ($5 million in property damage)

Heavy flooding was responsible for closing 90% of the roads in Pulaski County in August 2013 after several days of consistently heavy rainfall. Approximately two dozen low-water crossings were washed out, and 65% of roadway damage was considered “major.” The storms killed two people and forced many more into a relief shelter set up by the Red Cross in Waynesville.

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Cyclonebiskit // Wikimedia Commons

#38. Connecticut

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $9.5 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $2.66 (#14 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2011 tropical storm in Windham ($20 million in property damage)

Although downgraded to a tropical storm by the time it reached Connecticut in 2011, Hurricane Irene caused severe damage to the state. After the storm passed, more than half of Connecticut was left without power, and 25 homes in East Haven alone were destroyed. Residents in Farmington, Riverwood, and Farmington Village were all asked to evacuate, displacing about 2,000 people into statewide shelters.

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National Weather Service // Wikimedia Commons

#37. Mississippi

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $9.6 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $3.21 (#18 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2009 tornado in De Soto ($6 million in property damage)

A low-pressure center in the South was to blame for several tornadoes on July 30, 2009, that waged severe winds, hail, and flash flooding in De Soto. A tornado touched down in Bethel Park, destroying seven homes and damaging hundreds of others. Additionally, trees and power lines were knocked down, and the storm moved northeast.

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CGPGrey.com // Flickr

#36. Kentucky

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $12.1 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $2.70 (#15 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2009 flash flood in Jefferson ($45 million in property damage)

Record-breaking rain hammered Kentucky on the morning of Aug. 4, 2009, with six inches of rain accumulating just between 7 a.m. and 10 a.m, followed by rain falling at a rate of over eight inches per hour. About 200 Louisville residents were stranded on top of cars or houses and had to be rescued by emergency officials, and 50 people were rescued in a boat from the University of Louisville. Floodwaters destroyed thousands of books at the Louisville downtown library and damaged several area hospitals as well as horse barns at the famous Churchill Downs.

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Matt Kieffer // Flickr

#35. Utah

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $13.7 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $4.34 (#23 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2018 wildfire in Wasatch Plateau/Book Cliffs ($25 million in property damage)

The 2018 Dollar Ridge Fire in Utah burned for almost two months, beginning July 1 and continuing into August, burning over 68,400 acres. The wildfire—which officials determined was man made—destroyed at least 74 homes and hundreds of sheds and camp trailers. Hundreds of firefighters battled the blaze as thousands of Utahns evacuated to escape the inferno.

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James St. John // Flickr

#34. Montana

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $14.3 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $13.45 (#14 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2010 hail in Gallatin ($60 million in property damage)

Baseball and golf ball-sized hail rained down the Gallatin Valley in June 2010, leaving Bozeman with irreparably damaged buildings, vehicles, and trees in its aftermath. The hailstorm lasted for about 20 minutes, which was enough time to break windows at Montana State University and knock down trees and power lines in the surrounding area. Still, the area was hit with a second hailstorm shortly after, causing widespread power outages and sending 10 people to the hospital with related injuries.

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ZACH GIBSON/AFP // Getty Images

#33. Virginia

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $14.3 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $1.68 (#13 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2018 flash flood in Lynchburg (C) ($18 million in property damage)

Heavy rains in Lynchburg caused water to spill over an 84-year-old dam, prompting thousands of evacuations and causing one road to collapse into a creek. The city received four-to-six inches of rain, overflowing a nearby lake, and raising concerns that the dam itself would collapse into disrepair. Luckily, the dam remained intact, but not before officials had to rescue families in boats as the area remained under a flash-flood watch for days.

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Eugene R. Thieszen // Shutterstock

#32. Oklahoma

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $14.4 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $3.65 (#19 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2012 wildfire in Creek ($55 million in property damage)

Roughly three dozen wildfires ripped through Oklahoma in the summer of 2012, killing at least one person, destroying dozens of homes, and burning about 120 structures to the ground. The fire covered about 100 square miles in an area west of Tulsa and was made worse by warm winter conditions followed by early spring. The fire was the largest in recent state history.

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NOAA Photo LIbrary // Flickr

#31. South Dakota

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $14.5 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $16.41 (#11 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2013 hail in Pennington ($12 million in property damage)

A supercell thunderstorm was responsible for a hailstorm that ravaged Piedmont, Rapid City, and Black Hills, causing widespread property damage because of the larger-than-average hailstones. The storm also gave rise to a tornado, followed by flooding in Rapid City and Rapid Creek in a once-in-a-lifetime weather event that wreaked havoc on South Dakota.

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arak7 // Shutterstock

#30. New Mexico

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $15 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $7.15 (#22 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2012 wildfire in South Central Mountains ($26 million in property damage)

Southern New Mexico was scorched with the largest wildfire in the state's history in June 2012, burning an area one and a half times the size of Chicago. The fire was caused by a lightning strike the previous month, starting as two separate fires that eventually merged, leading to the destruction of over 380 square miles. The blaze was made worse by extreme drought conditions and sustained winds of more than 40 miles per hour, which only fanned the flames.

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jessica.kirsh // Shutterstock

#29. Nevada

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $16.6 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $5.48 (#27 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2012 hail in Clark ($50 million in property damage)

Monsoon moisture was to blame for five days of severe thunderstorms over the Mojave Desert and Great Basin area, producing dense and dangerous flash floods in the region. The worst damage came from a hailstorm which dropped hailstones measuring up to 1.25 inches in diameter in the North Las Vegas. The hail damaged thousands of vehicles and buildings.

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Win Henderson // Wikimedia Commons

#28. Arkansas

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $20.2 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $6.69 (#23 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2009 hail in Pulaski ($60 million in property damage)

June 2009 was a month of severe weather for the state of Arkansas, beginning with a weather event called a “derecho” on June 12, which produced wind speeds of 60 to 80 miles per hour, and left at least 70,000 homes without power. Just a few weeks later on the 30th, hailstones up to the size of baseballs hammered the central part of the state. About 22 to 27 farmers in the area estimated to have lost between 60-100% of their crops just from the storm alone.

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USFWS Endangered Species // Flickr

#27. Arizona

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $20.9 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $2.91 (#16 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2011 wildfire in White Mountains ($58 million in property damage)

The 2011 Wallow Fire was the largest fire ever recorded in Arizona, forcing almost 6,000 people to flee and destroying 32 homes and over 30 other structures. The fire, which burned for 841 square miles, cost the government $72 million to suppress and $37 million more for cleanup and rebuilding efforts. In the six weeks that the fire was ablaze, it burned over 538,000 acres of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest.

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Menno van der Haven // Shutterstock

#26. North Dakota

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $26.8 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $35.20 (#5 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2016 hail in Burleigh ($50 million in property damage)

Hailstones measuring up to 3.25 inches in diameter—larger than the size of a baseball—pummelled North Dakota towns in July 2016, especially damaging the city of Killdeer. The storm ripped sidings off of homes, damaged vehicles, and downed trees, leaving some residents describing their town looking like a “war zone.” In certain parts of the state, hail reportedly piled up to more than a foot.

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Ty Wright // Getty Images

#25. West Virginia

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $26.8 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $14.83 (#12 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2016 flash flood in Greenbrier ($40 million in property damage)

Just two weeks before the Professional Golfers' Association Tour's Greenbrier Classic was scheduled to take place at the famous Greenbrier Resort in West Virginia in the summer of 2016, the town was struck with torrential downpours that flooded many areas of the state, including the golf course. The death toll from flooding across the state climbed as high as 23 people, while the total rainfall from just one day measured eight to 10 inches. The state's governor declared a state of emergency and the golf tournament was canceled.

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KennStilger47 // Shutterstock

#24. Tennessee

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $27 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $3.99 (#22 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2013 flash flood in Davidson ($50 million in property damage)

The summer of 2013 ushered in a record-breaking storm for the Nashville area, where during the first week of May the city and its suburbs received almost 14 inches of rain in 36 hours. More than 11,000 properties were damaged, and 10,000 people had to evacuate due to the storm. Even one year after the flooding, 300-400 businesses remained closed. The storm caused $120 million worth of public infrastructure damage in Nashville alone.

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Melanie Metz // Shutterstock

#23. Kansas

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $29.7 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $10.19 (#18 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2010 hail in Sedgwick ($150 million in property damage)

Severe thunderstorms that plagued Kansas Sept. 15, 2010, gave rise to six different tornadoes and colossal hailstones that measured 7.75 inches in diameter—some larger than the size of a softball and setting a record in Kansas. These events, combined with high wind speeds up to 75 miles per hour, caused extensive damage to both vehicles and buildings. Hailstones piled up to at least seven inches in some areas.

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Patsy Lynch // Wikimedia Commons

#22. Minnesota

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $30.4 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $5.41 (#26 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2010 flood in Steele ($28 million in property damage)

A slow-moving warm front in Minnesota introduced heavy thunderstorms in the area on Sept. 22, 2010 and brought a day-long period of consistent rain. The highest total rainfall was reported in Winnebago at more than 11 inches after two days of storms, while nearly all southern Minnesota towns received at least four inches of rain. Crops were drowned entirely in water, severely impacting the state's fall harvest, and many roads in the area were damaged.

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Matt Putzel // Wikimedia Commons

#21. Massachusetts

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $33.8 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $4.90 (#25 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2011 tornado in Hampden ($228 million in property damage)

At least two tornadoes touched down near Springfield in June 2011, killing four and causing damage uncommon for the area. Damage was reported in 19 Massachusetts communities as a result of the storms, and 1,000 members of the state's National Guard were dispatched to assist with search-and-rescue efforts and debris removal. Hundreds of people were displaced after the tornadoes cleared and were forced to flee to shelters.

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Bayley James Fridley // Shutterstock

#20. Ohio

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $36 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $3.08 (#17 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2010 tornado in Wood ($100 million in property damage)

A fierce tornado unleashed fury on northwest Ohio in June 2010, killing seven people and flattening a seven-mile strip outside of Toledo. Lake High School was destroyed just hours before the school was scheduled to hold a graduation ceremony, while 50 homes were ripped apart and a movie theater collapsed. The storm also put the area's emergency services offline, and officials had to be relocated to a nearby town to assist victims of the twister.

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JOSH EDELSON/AFP // Getty Images

#19. California

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $39.3 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $0.99 (#9 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2018 wildfire in Mountains Southwest Shasta County To Northern Lake County ($56 million in property damage)

The Mendocino Complex Fire that ravaged California beginning in late July 2018 burned nearly 460,000 acres, destroying 157 homes and 280 structures in the process. The fire, which started as two separate wildfires, was the largest in the state's history and wasn't wholly contained until the end of September. The inferno killed one firefighter and injured four other people.

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Jason Kriess SFC, Washington National Guard // Wikimedia Commons

#18. Washington

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $41.3 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $5.48 (#25 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2014 wildfire in Okanagan Valley ($120 million in property damage)

The 2014 Carlton Complex wildfire was the largest fire in Washington's history, beginning with just a lightning spark on July 14. Four separate fires from the incident merged on July 18, burning 256,108 acres and incinerating 353 homes. Firefighters were still battling some blazes the following month when downpours of rain caused massive mudslides in the area, which helped control the fire's flames, but also blocked a highway and swallowed a dozen vehicles.

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CenUSA Bioenergy // Flickr

#17. Nebraska

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $44.5 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $23.07 (#9 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2012 drought in Holt ($50 million in property damage)

Nebraska experienced a devastating drought during the summer of 2012, brought on by soaring high temperatures and little-to-no precipitation. In the town of McCook, 37 days during the summer brought temperatures of over 100 degrees, more than triple the average number of just 11 days. Steep drops in groundwater plagued several parts of the state, making agricultural production difficult if not impossible. By January of the following year, 75% of the state was in a severe drought.

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Ruhrfisch // Wikimedia Commons

#16. Pennsylvania

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $48 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $3.75 (#20 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2011 flood in Dauphin ($150 million in property damage)

Remnants of Tropical Storm Lee in September 2011 brought record-breaking flooding to central Pennsylvania, causing thousands of evacuations and destroying almost 300 homes and businesses just in Dauphin County. Both Lebanon and Dauphin counties received a foot of rain, and in Lancaster County, a historic covered bridge was completely swept away. The Swatara Creek reached 27 feet high—10 feet higher than the previous record.

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Bruce Kinney // Wikimedia Commons

#15. Georgia

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $50.5 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $4.80 (#24 lowest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2009 flood in Fulton ($48 million in property damage)

A series of days with heavy rainfall caused severe flooding in metropolitan Atlanta in September 2009, causing 10 to 20 inches of rain in just 24 hours in some areas at the peak of the storm. The yearly chance of any Atlanta suburb receiving this amount of rain in just a day is less than 0.01%. Over 20,000 homes in the area were estimated to have significant damage from the flooding, and 17 counties in Georgia received Federal Disaster Declarations.

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NASA // Wikimedia Commons

#14. Idaho

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $51.8 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $29.52 (#7 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2012 wildfire in Caribou Highlands ($472 million in property damage)

A series of separate wildfires roared across Idaho in August 2012, sparking severe air quality alerts for large swaths of the state. The largest fire was the Mustang Complex, which comprised five different fires, and burned almost 253,000 acres after lightning strikes ignited blazes in late July. The Trinity Ridge Complex began Aug. 3 and eventually burned 146,000 acres, forcing residents of Featherville to evacuate. The Halstead Fire started in late July and burned 140,000 acres and wasn't contained until September.

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T-I // Shutterstock

#13. Wisconsin

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $55.6 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $9.57 (#19 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2018 flood in Dane ($33 million in property damage)

Heavy flooding in Wisconsin in late August 2018 led then-Gov. Scott Walker to declare a state of emergency for the entire state. Severe thunderstorms, downpours, flooding, and tornadoes caused downed trees and power lines, with some areas receiving more than 12 inches of rain. About 3,000 homes were left without electricity amidst several road closures and stalled Amtrak trains, some of which were forced to house passengers overnight.

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Dan Ross // Shutterstock

#12. Iowa

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $86.4 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $27.38 (#8 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2018 tornado in Marshall ($200 million in property damage)

Iowa was hit with a whopping 69 tornadoes in total in 2018, with the first four of the year all taking place on May 3. But the largest tornado event of the year—and the largest since November 2015—occurred on July 19, when 21 tornadoes touched down across Iowa. One hit a manufacturing plant in Vermeer, causing 13 injuries, and another struck part of Marshalltown, causing severe damage over a path of over 8 miles. Twenty-two people were injured from the series of storms.

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Garrett Nantz // Shutterstock

#11. New Jersey

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $92.5 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $10.38 (#17 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2011 flood in Somerset ($200 million in property damage)

Then-New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie famously told his state's residents to “Get the hell off the beach,” just before Hurricane Irene arrived on the state's shores in 2011, and for good reason. Over 1 million people evacuated the area as about 250 roads were closed because of flooding. Hundreds of thousands of people were without power, while authorities issued warnings to boil water in seven separate communities because of the storm. The Hackensack River basin was just one of many waterways to overflow during the storm, leaving severe damage in the northern part of the state near New York.

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Scott Olson // Getty Images

#10. Illinois

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $96.8 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $7.59 (#20 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2010 flash flood in Cook ($253 million in property damage)

Severe storms in July 2010 hammered the Chicago area, dumping more than 7 inches of rain in many parts of Illinois. About 150,000 people were left without power, and city officials said they received over 1,300 reports of city residents with water flooded in basements. Chicago suburbs experienced high winds and experienced fallen trees and power lines while cleaning up from the storms. A 12-foot sinkhole also popped up in the city during the same time, making recovery even more challenging.

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Jason Patrick Ross // Shutterstock

#9. Michigan

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $131 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $13.10 (#15 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2014 flash flood in Oakland ($400 million in property damage)

Almost half a foot of rain soaked the Detroit area in August 2014, causing nearly 10 billion gallons of sewer overflows and prompting then-President Barack Obama to sign an emergency declaration for the entire state in September. The roadways in the area were particularly damaged, and officials have speculated that stolen copper from pumping stations used to remove standing water may have contributed to flooded streets. Homes in the area didn't fare much better: just weeks after the flood hit, scrap yards were overwhelmed with damaged appliances and vehicles, some collecting well over a million pounds.

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HopsonRoad // Wikimedia Commons

#8. Vermont

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $135 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $215.60 (#2 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2011 flood in Orleans ($500 million in property damage)

Although Vermont doesn't have a coastline, that didn't prevent it from enduring Tropical Storm Irene during the summer of 2011. The storm struck some parts of the state with as much as 11 inches of rain in rapid succession, completely overwhelming a state that wasn't equipped to handle this extent of severe weather. More than 800 homes and businesses were destroyed or damaged, along with 2,400 roads and 300 bridges. As a result of the storm, the state's government passed legislation addressing its role in flood response.

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EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP // Getty Images

#7. New York

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $143.1 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $7.32 (#21 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2011 flood in Tioga ($309 million in property damage)

Just after the Northeast was battered with Tropical Storm Irene, Tropical Storm Lee drenched the region in a fresh batch of downpours in September 2011, prompting officials to order 20,000 Binghamton residents to evacuate. The Susquehanna River rose 11 feet above flood level, overflowing retaining walls. Parts of Binghamton University were used as shelters for displaced residents while rainwater submerged vehicles and backyards in the area.

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North Carolina National Guard // Flickr

#6. North Carolina

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $146.2 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $14.08 (#13 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2018 hurricane in Inland Pender ($300 million in property damage)

Hurricane Florence of 2018 was the wettest tropical cyclone on record in the Carolinas and broke all kinds of records with its 9- to 13-foot storm surge. The hurricane drenched North Carolina with 20 to 30 inches of rain in some areas, producing an onslaught of flooding. Swansboro recorded a total rainfall of 34 inches, while Cape Lookout reported wind gusts of up to 106 miles per hour. The storm toppled thousands of trees, causing power outages for most of the eastern part of the state.

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Carol Lawrence // USAF

#5. Colorado

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $403 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $70.75 (#4 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2012 wildfire in Northern El Paso County / Monument Ridge / Rampart Range below 7,500 feet ($400 million in property damage)

The 2012 Waldo Canyon Fire was the most destructive fire in Colorado's history, burning 346 homes and forcing around 32,000 Colorado Springs residents to evacuate. The fire closed a highway as well as several parks, railroads, and the Air Force Academy. At one point, over 1,200 firefighters worked to battle the blaze while the Red Cross set up several evacuation centers for displaced families.

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Chip Somodevilla // Getty Images

#4. Florida

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $440.2 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $20.67 (#10 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2017 hurricane in Pinellas ($594 million in property damage)

Hurricane Irma was the strongest Atlantic basin hurricane ever recorded outside the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea, officially becoming a hurricane Aug. 31. The storm reached southwest Florida Sept. 10, causing tornadoes and flooding as it battered the coast, forcing the evacuations of 5.6 million people. Irma hit the Florida Keys as a Category 4 storm, destroying about 25% of the homes on the islands and leaving 50,000 people in Monroe County without power. In Miami, wind gusts reached 90 miles per hour.

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Petty Officer 1st Class Melissa // USDOD

#3. Louisiana

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $562.8 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $120.78 (#3 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2016 flash flood in East Baton Rouge ($722 million in property damage)

A slow-moving storm system in the summer of 2016 deposited over 20 inches of rain in parts of East Baton Rouge over three days, leading to widespread catastrophic flash flooding. Between 50,000 and 75,000 structures flooded, and 13 people died because of the devastating storm. The Amite River swelled to more than 46 feet after the rainfall finally stopped, beating a 1983 record by five feet. The storm was estimated to have about a one in 1,000 chance in occurring.

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Rondo Estrello // Flickr

#2. Texas

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $976.7 million
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $34.03 (#6 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2012 hail in Dallas ($900 million in property damage)

Softball-sized hail pummelled the Dallas area in June 2012, in the fourth-costliest hailstorm in Texas history. The storm also produced a tornado in the city of Randolph, which caused extensive damage to homes, crops, and barns, and had wind speeds of up to 85 miles per hour. The wind was so strong it even blew out windows in a mall and snapped trees, causing widespread power outages across the area and littering debris in the storm's wake.

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Alessandro Pietri // Shutterstock

#1. Puerto Rico

- Annual property damage, summers 2009-2018: $1.7 billion
- Annual summer property damage per capita: $517.30 (#1 highest among all states)
- Worst summer weather event: 2017 flash flood in Aguas Buenas ($750 million in property damage)

In September 2017, Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico, causing one of the nation's most-catastrophic humanitarian crises. The storm was the worst to hit the island in more than 80 years, and over 200,000 Puerto Ricans have moved to the mainland United States since Maria. The entire island lost power when the hurricane hit, and even two months later, less than half of residents had had their power restored, becoming the largest blackout in U.S. history. While the official death toll is 64, the number is disputed, and the real number is widely believed to be well over 1,000.

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