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50 jobs expected to shrink the most

50 jobs expected to shrink the most
1/Robert Przybysz // Shutterstock

50 jobs expected to shrink the most

In 2016, the state of coal-mining jobs became a political issue. The coal industry was facing a multi-decade decline as new sources of petroleum and natural gas have emerged. In 2016, the coal industry hit its lowest point for demand in 118 years, with layoffs balloning. Per the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, the number of coal jobs lost in just the first three months of 2016 exceeded 1,500.

While coal's demise can be blamed on the conflation of the emergence of affordable green energy, the introduction ofhydrofracturing or “fracking,” and tightened environmental regulations, casting blame does not bring relief to the Appalachian coal region, where coal mining is a way of life. Compounding the pain is more-efficient modern mining equipment reduces the number of miners needed to work a mine.

Losing a job is always difficult—a facet of industry, however, is that certain occupations will move in and out of demand, depending on the tasks these occupations specialize in, and if those tasks are currently needed. Global trade may, for example, limit the need to produce goods at a higher cost domestically. Improvement in technology may make a skilled worker's job obsolete. Changes in purchasing habits may make certain goods less attractive than they were previously. While some may exploit these changes for political gains as technology changes, so does industry and the jobs that are in demand.

Stacker has looked at the Bureau of Labor Statics' Occupational Outlook Handbook to determine the 50 jobs that will be in the least demand in the future. For this list, we are looking at the BLS's forecast for job demand from 2016 to 2026. This data set was last updated in April 2018.

In the eventuality of ties, we sorted the occupations by 2018 wages.

Keep reading to learn if your job is likely to go into decline.

You may also like50 fastest-growing jobs for the future (solar installers, wind turbine technicians, nurses)

#50. Computer programmers
2/Free-Photos // Pixabay

#50. Computer programmers

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -7.22%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 294,900
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -21,300
- 2018 median annual wage: $84,280
- Typical entry-level education: Bachelor's degree

We are living in the Internet Era, with almost every industry requiring computer intervention. So, it is weird to think computer-programming jobs will eventually decline in demand. However, this is a natural phenomenon; as the computer industry moves from being an emergent or developing technology to being mainstream, the number of new jobs created will decrease. As an industry matures, new hires will be used more to replace retiring or terminated employees, and not to fill newly created positions.

#49. Mail clerks and mail machine operators, except postal service
3/Golden Pixels LLC // Shutterstock

#49. Mail clerks and mail machine operators, except postal service

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -7.43%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 95,500
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -7,100
- 2018 median annual wage: $30,430
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Speaking of the Internet Era, a victim of digitalization has been traditional mail delivery. As it is cheaper to send an email than a stamped letter, the move to a paperless work environment is as much about economy as it is about waste management and efficiency. The consequence of this is the lessened need for corporate mailrooms and dedicated mail clerks.

#48. Bailiffs
4/Andrey Burmakin // Shutterstock

#48. Bailiffs

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -7.45%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 468,600
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -34,900
- 2018 median annual wage: $44,400
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Bailiffs are court-employed law-enforcement officers charged with securing the court while in session and overseeing individuals that are in the court's custody or who are facing trial or other legal hearings. These officers are sworn to obey the orders of the court. While there will always be a need for bailiffs, state budget cuts will limit the number of bailiffs that can be hired and retained.

#47. Telecommunications equipment installers and repairers, except line installers
5/Kitawit Jitaton // Shutterstock

#47. Telecommunications equipment installers and repairers, except line installers

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -7.66%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 237,600
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -18,200
- 2018 median annual wage: $56,100
- Typical entry-level education: Post-secondary, non-degree certificate

Telecommunication equipment installers install the switches, computer equipment, and lines needed to transmit communication signals. While telephone use remains high, the switch from landlines to wireless requires fewer installers, as wireless technology uses less equipment and physical connections.

#46. First-line supervisors of correctional officers
6/CoreCivic // Flickr

#46. First-line supervisors of correctional officers

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -7.74%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 45,200
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -3,500
- 2018 median annual wage: $63,340
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Like bailiffs, correctional officers' supervisors are the victim of state and federal budget cuts. Typically charged with the training and day-to-day supervision of prison staff, correctional officers' supervisors are needed to prevent gross negligence and abuse. However, with the move to reduce prison sentences and use non-confinement sentencing for non-violent offenses, there is less need for correctional officers. With fewer correctional officers hired, fewer supervisors are needed.

#45. Labor relations specialists
7/Geraldshields11 // Wikimedia Commons

#45. Labor relations specialists

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -7.77%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 81,100
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -6,300
- 2018 median annual wage: $67,790
- Typical entry-level education: Bachelor's degree

Labor-relations specialists work to settle employee disputes with labor contracts. These specialists are charged to interpret these contracts and enforce them toward the fair administration of pension, health care, wages, benefits, and management agreements. The decline of union membership, however, has limited the number of labor-relations specialists needed.

#44. Tellers
8/Adwo // Shutterstock

#44. Tellers

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -8.32%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 502,700
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -41,800
- 2018 median annual wage: $29,450
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Tellers are customer-service representatives with banks and credit unions that are charged with processing customers' withdrawals and deposits, creating new accounts, and selling bank products. The frontline support in a typical bank, this is the person you are most likely to interact with at a bank. However, the advent of ATMs and the move toward remote banking are reducing the need for an in-person teller.

#43. Shoe machine operators and tenders
9/fotoinfot // Shutterstock

#43. Shoe machine operators and tenders

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -8.33%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 3,600
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -300
- 2018 median annual wage: $30,430
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

It wasn't so long ago that shoes were made by hand by cobblers. Shoemaking machines reduced the need for these tradesmen, with shoemaking machines allowing shoe companies to radically increase production and maintain quality. However, the move toward robotics and computer-aided manufacturing has reduced the need for dedicated operators, as has the opening of the global market and the importing of foreign-made footwear.

#42. Public address system and other announcers
10/Jorge Guillen // Pixabay

#42. Public address system and other announcers

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -8.54%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 52,700
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -4,500
- 2018 median annual wage: $31,990
- Typical entry-level education: Not applicable

Announcers address the public through an announcement system, such as radio, a public-announcement system in a venue, or through privately established systems like concerts or private events. The announcer can provide important information, narration, news, or commentary—along with music, sports, or other event broadcast, or other forms of entertainment. The advent of artificial intelligence–driven virtual announcers, and the increased use of smartphones and other mobile computing, reduce the need for announcers, although there will probably always be a place for seasoned DJs.

#41. Computer numerically controlled machine tool programmers, metal and plastic
11/Airman 1st Class Dillon J. Audit // USAF

#41. Computer numerically controlled machine tool programmers, metal and plastic

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -8.78%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 1,039,600
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -91,300
- 2018 median annual wage: $36,080
- Typical entry-level education: Not applicable

Computer numerically controlled machine tool programmers operate the machinery used in the forming, cutting, shaping, and extruding of plastic and metal components. The transition of manufacturing from the United States to foreign producers and advances in robotics will reduce the number of programmers needed.

#40. Broadcast news analysts
12/Caroline Culler // Wikimedia Commons

#40. Broadcast news analysts

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -8.93%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 50,400
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -4,500
- 2018 median annual wage: $43,490
- Typical entry-level education: Bachelor's degree

Broadcast news analysts are the on-screen and behind-the-camera reporting staff that collect, interpret, and deliver news of local, national, and international importance. This can be for television, radio, web, or newspaper. Due to declining advertising revenues and a transition to social media–driven or nontraditional news reporting, the number of new reporters hired is expected to decrease.

#39. Paper goods machine setters, operators, and tenders
13/RossHelen // Shutterstock

#39. Paper goods machine setters, operators, and tenders

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -8.99%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 94,600
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -8,500
- 2018 median annual wage: $38,730
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Paper goods machine setters, operators, and tenders set up and operate the machinery needed to make paper goods, such as cardboard products, paper bags, and books. Advances in technology, the opening of the global market, and increased environmentalism have all reduced the need for these machinists.

#38. Manufactured building and mobile home installers
14/Henryk Sadura // Shutterstock

#38. Manufactured building and mobile home installers

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -9.30%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 4,300
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -400
- 2018 median annual wage: $32,040
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Manufactured building and mobile-home installers move and install pre-made buildings or mobile homes. While there is an increase in popularity of such constructions, advances in technology has made the installation of pre-made buildings easier, requiring smaller crews. Previously, manufactured buildings may have required as many laborers as building a building from scratch, with the only difference being the time needed for assembly.

#37. Chemical plant and system operators
15/PEO ACWA // Flickr

#37. Chemical plant and system operators

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -9.34%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 33,200
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -3,100
- 2018 median annual wage: $62,060
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Chemical plant and system operators set up and operate chemical plants for the fabrication of distillates, plastics, household compounds, and industrial solutions. Robotics have reduced the need for human interaction, minimizing the potential for harm and death. The opening of the global market also has allowed foreign manufacturers to sell chemical products in the United States, shrinking domestic production.

#36. Extruding and forming machine setters, operators, and tenders, synthetic and glass fibers
16/GordonJ86 // Wikimedia Commons

#36. Extruding and forming machine setters, operators, and tenders, synthetic and glass fibers

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -9.41%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 20,200
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -1,900
- 2018 median annual wage: $34,200
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

As with plastic and metal fabrication equipment operators, synthetic and glass fibers extruding and forming-machine setters and operators are in decline. This is due tothe presence of international producers on the global market and efficiencies to make the products easier and with less necessary oversight.

#35. Tailors, dressmakers, and custom sewers
17/Anna L // Unsplash

#35. Tailors, dressmakers, and custom sewers

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -10.16%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 44,300
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -4,500
- 2018 median annual wage: $31,000
- Typical entry-level education: No formal educational credential

While there are certainly custom dressmakers and tailors in business today, the import of foreign-made clothing has reduced the need for domestic tailors, dressmakers, and custom sewers. As with much of this nation's manufacturing base, the opening of the global market made it less profitable to maintain wide-scale domestic production. For cheaper goods, such as T-shirts and jeans, it may be more important to have a lower price point than to say the item is made in the USA.

#34. Cutters and trimmers, hand
18/skeeze // Pixabay

#34. Cutters and trimmers, hand

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -10.20%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 14,700
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -1,500
- 2018 median annual wage: $29,390
- Typical entry-level education: No formal educational credential

Cutters and trimmers use hand tools to cut or trim prepared items, like carpet, glass, rubber, or stone. As production methods have made it easier to fabricate items to size and as robotics have made it easier to make precision cuts, the need for human hand cutters is shrinking.

#33. Motion picture projectionists
19/W. Eugene Barnett Jr. // USAF

#33. Motion picture projectionists

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -10.34%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 5,800
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -600
- 2018 median annual wage: $22,760
- Typical entry-level education: No formal educational credential

Most motion-picture projectors today use a digital movie file which is projected using a high-definition digital projector. As such, the need for reel splicers and projector loaders are minimized. A modern movie theater can run all of its films from a single terminal, with projectionist being needed for special format films like IMAX or for non-digital films.

#32. Printing press operators
20/giocalde // Shutterstock

#32. Printing press operators

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -10.41%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 178,700
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -18,600
- 2018 median annual wage: $36,220
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Another example of a job shrinking because of mechanization, printing-press operators were once an essential career. Printing-press operators would create printing plates and operate the presses in the production of newspapers, magazines, pamphlets, forms, and books. However, with the advent of digital printing, printing presses and printing-press operators are becoming rare.

#31. Inspectors, testers, sorters, samplers, and weighers
21/ndoeljindoel // Shutterstock

#31. Inspectors, testers, sorters, samplers, and weighers

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -10.66%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 520,700
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -55,500
- 2018 median annual wage: $38,250
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Quality-control inspectors ensure that a manufactured good meets specification, including size, weight, quality, and integrity. Advances in technology have simplified the quality-control process, automating tasks that reduce the demand on inspectors.

#30. Travel agents
22/rawpixel // Pexels

#30. Travel agents

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -11.63%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 81,700
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -9,500
- 2018 median annual wage: $38,700
- Typical entry-level education: High school diploma or equivalent

A travel agent sells and advises on transportation, lodging, and entertainment options as part of a travel package. Travel agents plan itineraries, set up reservations, and accept payment for trip options for individuals, groups, and businesses. With internet self-service options, like Expedia.com, there is less of a need for a dedicated travel agent.

#29. Shoe and leather workers and repairers
23/Dean Drobot // Shutterstock

#29. Shoe and leather workers and repairers

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -11.82%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 11,000
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -1,300
- 2018 median annual wage: $28,840
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

A special type of cobbling, leather shoe repair requires an understanding of how to work and finish leather. Such leather workers can produce and repair other leather products, like purses, luggage, and saddles.

#28. Print binding and finishing workers
24/giocalde // Shutterstock

#28. Print binding and finishing workers

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -12.04%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 54,000
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -6,500
- 2018 median annual wage: $32,890
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

A print binder takes printed materials and binds them into pamphlets, magazines, or books. Bookbinding was once an art that required a skilled artisan, but advances in technology and materials have largely automated the binding process.

#27. Tire builders
25/Vladimir Melnik // Shutterstock

#27. Tire builders

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -12.11%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 22,300
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -2,700
- 2018 median annual wage: $46,630
- Typical entry-level education: High school diploma or equivalent

Building a vehicle tire can be complicated. Not only does the tire's rubber composition must be properly mixed and vulcanized, but the tire must be assembled correctly, including proper positioning of the tire's belt and bead and accurate impressing of the tire's tread. Improvement in coordinated robotics, however, means that the tire-building industry will need fewer machine operators.

#26. Fallers
26/Markus Spiske // Unsplash

#26. Fallers

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -12.48%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 55,300
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -6,900
- 2018 median annual wage: $40,650
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Fallers are tree cutters, tasked with harvesting timber for consumer goods and industrial products. A move toward recycling existing materials and toward using synthetic products instead of wood will drive down the need for lumberjacks, although there will always be a need for skilled fallers.

#25. Coin, vending, and amusement machine servicers and repairers
27/ibnu alias // Shutterstock

#25. Coin, vending, and amusement machine servicers and repairers

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -12.57%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 36,600
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -4,600
- 2018 median annual wage: $34,560
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Coin, vending, and amusement-machine servicers repair and service coin-operated equipment, as well as restock vending machines and collect monies deposited. The declining number of these machines will require fewer servicers, although more advanced vending machines may require better-skilled servicers, such as servicers skilled in computer networking.

#24. Postal service clerks
28/Pfc. Sullivan Laramie // USMC

#24. Postal service clerks

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -13%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 502,400
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -65,300
- 2018 median annual wage: $58,760
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Postal-service clerks sort the mail, collect and deliver letters and packages, and provide frontline support in post offices. Clerks also work the sorting and processing machinery. More efficient equipment, coupled with budget cuts, will cause the hiring of fewer clerks, although there will always be a demand for mail clerks.

#23. Sewers, hand
29/Kris Atomic // Unsplash

#23. Sewers, hand

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -13.33%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 13,500
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -1,800
- 2018 median annual wage: $28,650
- Typical entry-level education: No formal educational credential

Hand sewers refine and finish fabric goods using a needle and thread. This category also includes stitchers and manual loom weavers. As fabric and clothing production continue to move offshore, there will be less demand for hand sewers in this country.

#22. Desktop publishers
30/Georgejmclittle // Shutterstock

#22. Desktop publishers

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -13.7%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 14,600
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -2,000
- 2018 median annual wage: $42,910
- Typical entry-level education: Associate's degree

Desktop publishers use specialized layout software to create page layouts for printed materials and websites. As more companies expect graphic designers, editors, and web designers to also perform desktop publishing tasks, the need for a specialized desktop publisher will decrease.

#21. Aircraft structure, surfaces, rigging, and systems assemblers
31/WikimediaImages // Pixabay

#21. Aircraft structure, surfaces, rigging, and systems assemblers

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -14.4%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 1,819,300
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -261,900
- 2018 median annual wage: $32,820
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Aircraft structure, surfaces, rigging, and systems assemblers create the parts that go into assembled final aviation products and assemble these systems for use. This includes making computers, instrument clusters, control panels, and engines. Advancement in automation and robotic constructions have reduced the number of human assemblers needed.

#20. Office machine operators, except computer
32/Chaay_Tee // Shutterstock

#20. Office machine operators, except computer

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -15.69%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 59,900
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -9,400
- 2018 median annual wage: $32,790
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Office machine operators use and maintain office equipment, such as postage meters, copy machines, duplicators, collation or binding machines, and photographic machines. While these machines still exist in many offices, most office machines are designed so that the average office worker can use them. This means that dedicated operators are becoming less necessary, except in specific cases.

#19. Textile cutting machine setters, operators, and tenders
33/Kartinkin77 // Shutterstock

#19. Textile cutting machine setters, operators, and tenders

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -16%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 15,000
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -2,400
- 2018 median annual wage: $28,220
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Textile cutting machine operators take fabric or apparel patterns and cut pieces for assembly. This can be done by hand or with the use of a computer-aided cutter. The cutter operator is also responsible for setting or programming the template for the cutting system.

#18. Fabric and apparel patternmakers
34/Photosite // Shutterstock

#18. Fabric and apparel patternmakers

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -16.36%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 5,500
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -900
- 2018 median annual wage: $40,560
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Fabric patternmakers make the pattern or template used to cut the needed pieces for an apparel item. A patternmaker translates a design for production, creating both fabric-cutting templates and sewing instructions. A patternmaker also determines what decorative flourishes, if any, should be added to an apparel item.

#17. Sewing machine operators
35/moritz320 // Pixabay

#17. Sewing machine operators

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -16.7%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 153,900
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -25,700
- 2018 median annual wage: $25,030
- Typical entry-level education: No formal educational credential

Sewing-machine operators combine fabrics, plastics, synthetic materials, and rubber via a sewing machine to produce clothing and footwear items, uniforms, bagging items, hats, and other fabric products. These are skilled labor positions, typically requiring a skilled seamstress or operator to efficiently produce goods.

#16. Textile winding, twisting, and drawing out machine setters, operators, and tenders
36/fotoinfot // Shutterstock

#16. Textile winding, twisting, and drawing out machine setters, operators, and tenders

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -16.88%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 30,800
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -5,200
- 2018 median annual wage: $28,920
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Many new world economies—like China and India—and many third-world nations, like Vietnam, Bangladesh, Indonesia, and Pakistan export finished cloths and fabrics to the United States. The increase of the global textile market has decreased the need for textile winding, twisting, and drawing out machine operators, which produces yarns and twisted fabric cords for clothing and household goods production.

#15. Textile bleaching and dyeing machine operators and tenders
37/LoggaWiggler // Pixabay

#15. Textile bleaching and dyeing machine operators and tenders

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -17.7%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 11,300
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -2,000
- 2018 median annual wage: $28,780
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

As stated previously, textile production is on the decline in the United States. This includes all facet of textile assembly, including textile bleaching and dyeing. With much of the nation's textile production now being outsourced, textile bleachers and dyers are accordingly in less demand.

#14. Photographic process workers and processing machine operators
38/Volkova Vera // Shutterstock

#14. Photographic process workers and processing machine operators

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -18.22%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 26,900
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -4,900
- 2018 median annual wage: $29,180
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Photographic process workers process photographic materials, including films and digital files, into prints. This may include negatives and slides processing. With photographic prints being replaced with digitally stored images, there is less of a need for dedicated photo processing in the consumer sphere.

#13. Textile knitting and weaving machine setters, operators, and tenders
39/MBatty // Pixabay

#13. Textile knitting and weaving machine setters, operators, and tenders

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -19.37%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 22,200
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -4,300
- 2018 median annual wage: $29,160
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Textile knitting and weaving machine setters and operators man industrial looms, producing textile for clothing assembly and for the production of household goods. This could be dangerous, as industrial loom workers at the turn of the 20th century would regularly be maimed or killed. Increased automation has made the process safer and introducing robotics and foreign production of textiles have reduced the demand of domestically produced cloths.

#12. Switchboard operators, including answering service
40/ESB Basic // Shutterstock

#12. Switchboard operators, including answering service

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -19.85%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 93,200
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -18,500
- 2018 median annual wage: $29,420
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Switchboard operators manage telephone systems for large institutions or offices, routing connections as needed and taking and delivering messages. Automated telephone switches, voice-mail systems, and automated voice response has made it less necessary to have a dedicated switchboard operator.

#11. Prepress technicians and workers
41/Dale Simonson // Flickr

#11. Prepress technicians and workers

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -19.94%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 34,600
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -6,900
- 2018 median annual wage: $40,410
- Typical entry-level education: Post-secondary non-degree award

Prepress technicians produce the digital and photo typesetting needed to format text and images into finished printed pages. This may or may not include producing printing plates. With the advent of digital printing, prepress technical work is less needed.

#10. Mine shuttle car operators
42/Mark Agnor // Shutterstock

#10. Mine shuttle car operators

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -20.00%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 1,500
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -300
- 2018 median annual wage: $56,340
- Typical entry-level education: No formal educational credential

Mine shuttle-car operators drive powered shuttles that carry mined materials and miners into and out of a mine's working face. With mining jobs on the decline and with mining conveyances being able to be operated remotely or autonomously, there is a need for fewer mine shuttle-car operators.

#9. Grinding and polishing workers, hand
43/Hello I'm Nik // Unsplash

#9. Grinding and polishing workers, hand

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -20.3%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 26,600
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -5,400
- 2018 median annual wage: $29,550
- Typical entry-level education: No formal educational credential

Grinding and polishing workers use hand tools or handheld power tools to refine materials like wood, metal, stone, clay, and glass. As with many manual fabrication jobs, automation and a lessened dependence on domestic manufacturing have reduced demand for such jobs.

#8. Postmasters and mail superintendents
44/US Census Bureau // Flickr

#8. Postmasters and mail superintendents

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -21.13%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 14,200
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -3,000
- 2018 median annual wage: $75,970
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

A postmaster is the supervisor of a local post-office branch. As the amount of mail processed daily has been declining because of email and digital messaging, and as the USPS has been struggling with budgetary concerns, many local post offices have closed. As such, the number of postmaster and superintendents needed has declined.

#7. Data entry keyers
45/Patrick Amoy // Unsplash

#7. Data entry keyers

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -21.25%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 203,800
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -43,300
- 2018 median annual wage: $32,170
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

A data-entry keyer operates a data-entry device, such as a numerical keypad, for the purposes of data entry into a database or data-processing system. Data-entry keyers must be able to double-check work, respond to errors, and be able to type similar content for long stretches of time. Advances in scanning equipment and character-recognition software has made these jobs less necessary.

#6. Telephone operators
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#6. Telephone operators

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -21.98%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 9,100
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -2,000
- 2018 median annual wage: $37,240
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Prior to the invention of automatic telephone switches, telephone operators were required to connect users and to pass calls between exchanges for long-distance and operator-assisted calls. Today, operators assist callers with collect calls or with calls that require direct intervention, such as a call interrupt and or an information lookup. However, artificial intelligence systems are replacing human operators with an increasing level of believability.

#5. Computer operators
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#5. Computer operators

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -22.91%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 51,500
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -11,800
- 2018 median annual wage: $45,840
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Computer operators monitor and control computers and data-processing equipment in business, scientific, engineering, and other data-analysis applications. In the early years of computers, operators would typically enter instructions to coordinate processes and to process raw data feeds. Today, many digital systems can operate without an operator or can function with minimal intervention.

#4. Watch repairers
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#4. Watch repairers

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -27.78%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 1,800
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -500
- 2018 median annual wage: $39,910
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Watches are among the most-expensive and complicated pieces of jewelry commonly wore. Watch repairers not only repair broken watch bodies but also adjust bands and fabricate custom components. However, with many opting not to wear a watch today, there is less of a need for watch repairers. As even the most-basic smartphones have a clock function, most people have access to the correct time in their pocket.

#3. Word processors and typists
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#3. Word processors and typists

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -33.11%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 74,900
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -24,800
- 2018 median annual wage: $39,750
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Word processors and typists are clerical workers charged with preparing reports, forms, and letters on a typewriter or computer. With the advent of transcription software, there is less need for a dedicated typist in an office.

#2. Parking enforcement workers
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#2. Parking enforcement workers

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -35.11%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 9,400
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -3,300
- 2018 median annual wage: $39,840
- Typical entry-level education: High-school diploma or equivalent

Parking-enforcement workers monitor and patrol parking spaces in a lot or area and issue citations for violations. In extreme cases when a vehicle is blocking the flow of traffic or is otherwise a nuisance, a parking-enforcement worker may authorize the vehicle to be towed away. However, with public cameras and with advances in artificial intelligence, many of the functions of parking-enforcement workers can be automated.

#1. Respiratory therapy technicians
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#1. Respiratory therapy technicians

- Projected job growth rate 2016–2026: -56.48%
- Number of jobs in 2016: 10,800
- Projected employment change 2016–2026: -6,100
- 2018 median annual wage: $51,210
- Typical entry-level education: Associate's degree

Respiratory-therapy technicians are medical specialists that assist patients with difficulty breathing. They may aid in providing emergency breathing relief to heart attack or drowning victims, assist premature babies with breathing outside the womb, or aid patients with diseased or damaged lungs. They do this through the application of specialized machinery, medication, or both. These technicians typically work underneath respiratory therapists or physicians and usually work as an aid. While respiratory therapists are expected to have the greatest growth of any occupation, respiratory therapy technicians are largely seen as redundant and sacrificial in the time of shrinking budgets.

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