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How your state gets to work

  • How your state gets to work
    1/ Alex Wong // Getty Images

    How your state gets to work

    If rush hour traffic is not your jam, you're not alone. People who commute half an hour or more to work report elevated levels of stress and anxiety, and people with commutes of any length experience lower satisfaction and happiness in life, according to the U.K.'s Office of National Statistics. The average American commute has been getting longer, rising from 26.6 minutes in 2016 to 26.9 minutes in 2017, the U.S. Census Bureau reported. And more than 14 million people now spend upwards of an hour getting to and from work.

    The heaviest traffic occurs in metropolitan areas around large cities, where jobs are most likely to be located, and rising home costs prevent most people from living in the cities they work in. This forces lower wage earners further out, increasing the numbers of cars on the road along with everyone's commute time. Data from the U.S. Census' 2015 American Community Survey showed that from 2014 to 2015, those with the longest commutes experienced the highest increase in time spent traveling to the office. In fact, the number of extreme commuters—who spend 90 minutes or more on the road—increased by 8% while the number of workers with hour-long commutes grew by more than 5%.

    Census data from the 2017 American Community Survey showed the longest commute times in the country belong to the metropolitan area of East Stroudsburg, Pa., where the average one-way travel time is 37.9 minutes, followed by the New York City area, where commutes clock in at about 37 minutes. The shortest commutes in the country can be found in Cheyenne, Wyo., and Grand Forks, N.D., where trips to work are less than 20 minutes.

    Using data published in 2018 from the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey, Stacker ranked every state from shortest to longest based on the mean travel time it takes to get to work. Any ties were broken by the percentage of workers whose commutes last longer than an hour. Read on to find out where you should hit the road—and where it might be time to rethink telecommuting.

    You may also like: Cities with the worst commutes in America

  • #51. South Dakota
    2/ Scott Olson // Getty Images

    #51. South Dakota

    - Mean travel time to work: 17 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 3.2%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 88.8%
    - Public transportation: 0.5%
    - Walk: 3.7%
    - Bicycle: 0.4%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 0.9%

    South Dakota boasts the shortest average commuting time in the United States. South Dakotans are also extremely likely to work in their home state—as of 2014, a whopping 95.2% of people living in South Dakota also worked in South Dakota while just 1.4% commuted to neighboring Iowa for the daily grind.

  • #50. North Dakota
    3/ Tim Evanson // Wikimedia Commons

    #50. North Dakota

    - Mean travel time to work: 17.1 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 4.3%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 89.9%
    - Public transportation: 0.5%
    - Walk: 3.6%
    - Bicycle: 0.4%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 0.8%

    Although almost 90% of North Dakota residents travel to work in an automobile, just 9% of the state's workers carpool, meaning the vast majority traverse the roads alone, according to the North Dakota Census Office. Among North Dakotans aged 16 to 19, 65% drive alone to their jobs: the lowest percentage of any age group. The younger generation is most likely to carpool or walk within the state, with 12% choosing to share their rides and 8% opting to walk.

  • #49. Montana
    4/ Mike Cline // GoodFreePhotos

    #49. Montana

    - Mean travel time to work: 17.8 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 3.9%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 85.3%
    - Public transportation: 0.8%
    - Walk: 5.1%
    - Bicycle: 1.3%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.1%

    Montana is tied for #2 of states with the highest percent of commuters biking or walking to work, based on 2016 data reported in the League of American Bicyclists' "Bicycling and Walking in the United States: 2018 Benchmarking Report." The state also ranks #2 for per capita spending on bicycling and walking projects: $9.56 per person.

  • #48. Wyoming
    5/ CGP Grey // Wikimedia Commons

    #48. Wyoming

    - Mean travel time to work: 18 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 5.8%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 88.1%
    - Public transportation: 1.3%
    - Walk: 4%
    - Bicycle: 0.8%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.1%

    More than 1 in 5 Wyoming residents commute from another state or county to get to work. Teton County takes the lead for outside employment, with more than 43% of employees coming from a different locale. Commuting data is an interesting predictor of local economic activity and Wyoming is no exception. For example, in Sublette County in 2005, workers at drilling rigs earned more than $76 million, but 90% of those employees lived in other counties.

  • #47. Nebraska
    6/ Hanyou23 // Wikimedia Commons

    #47. Nebraska

    - Mean travel time to work: 18.4 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 2.8%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 91%
    - Public transportation: 0.7%
    - Walk: 2.7%
    - Bicycle: 0.4%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 0.9%

    While Omaha is often called the “20-minute city” for its short commutes, local trends have suggested that commuters in the city might see longer driving times in the future. The Census Bureau has estimated that Douglas and Sarpy Counties have 59,000 more commuters who drive to work than a decade ago. Transportation experts have predicted that the future holds a significant increase in traffic for the Interstate system, the West Dodge Expressway, and Highway 370.

  • #46. Alaska
    7/ Kolmkolm // Wikimedia Commons

    #46. Alaska

    - Mean travel time to work: 18.8 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 4.8%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 80.9%
    - Public transportation: 1.5%
    - Walk: 8.0%
    - Bicycle: 0.9%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 4.3%

    Although few Alaskans rely on public transportation to get to work, that could soon change with a proposal for a commuter rail service between Anchorage and the Matanuska-Susitna Valley, which is often referred to as the Mat-Su. The region has seen an explosion in population, but the 45-mile drive from Mat-Su to Anchorage can be dangerous. Alaska Gov. Bill Walker included $4.5 million for the rail project in his budget proposal from last year.

  • #45. Iowa
    8/ formulanone // Wikimedia Commons

    #45. Iowa

    - Mean travel time to work: 19 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 3.4%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 89.4%
    - Public transportation: 1.1%
    - Walk: 3.4%
    - Bicycle: 0.5%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.0%

    Commuters in Iowa often get to work via I-380, and while the average Iowan's commute is short, traffic around the state's Creative Corridor has grown in recent years with more and more people traveling back and forth from Iowa City and Cedar Rapids. To cut down on time spent in rush hour, the Iowa Department of Transportation debuted a vanpool program in 2016, where riders can pay a monthly fare to travel between Linn, Johnson, Benton, Cedar, Jones, and Washington Counties.

  • #44. Kansas
    9/ Wikimedia Commons

    #44. Kansas

    - Mean travel time to work: 19.2 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 3.2%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 91.4%
    - Public transportation: 0.5%
    - Walk: 2.4%
    - Bicycle: 0.4%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1%

    More Kansas residents were commuting to work in 2016 than were in 2010, and in Kansas City in particular, higher wage earners are commuting more while lower wage earners are commuting less, according to the Wichita State-based Center for Economic Development and Business Research. However, many Kansas employees travel to one of the state's cities that have become hubs for certain sectors. Wichita has been a leader in manufacturing employment while Topeka has become a center for education and health care.

  • #43. Idaho
    10/ USEE1776 // Wikimedia Commons

    #43. Idaho

    - Mean travel time to work: 20.6 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 4.6%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 88.5%
    - Public transportation: 0.7%
    - Walk: 2.7%
    - Bicycle: 1%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.2%

    The Boise freeway has only seven exits and onramps in total, and has also been ranked third in Allstate's Best Driver Report. But for those opting to get off the roads and bike to work, Boise workers can take the scenic Boise Greenbelt bike route, which is a 25-mile trail along the Boise River. 

  • #42. Oklahoma
    11/ duggar11 // Wikimedia Commons

    #42. Oklahoma

    - Mean travel time to work: 21.5 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 4.5%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 92.7%
    - Public transportation: 0.4%
    - Walk: 1.7%
    - Bicycle: 0.3%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.1%

    Interstate 40—which runs from Los Angeles to North Carolina—and Interstate 35—which runs from Mexico to Canada—meet in Oklahoma City, making the region a heavily trafficked area. In 2018, Oklahoma City started its own streetcar, which hits all of the main points in OKC.

  • #41. Utah
    12/ An Errant Knight // Wikimedia Commons

    #41. Utah

    - Mean travel time to work: 21.6 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 4.6%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 87.4%
    - Public transportation: 2.5%
    - Walk: 2.5%
    - Bicycle: 0.8%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.1%

    The average commute time is on the rise in Utah, especially in places like West Valley City, Sandy, and South Jordan where driving to work can take upwards of 25 minutes. While that may seem short to some in the rest of the country, it pales in comparison to the commute times in Orem and Provo, where employees can get to the office in just 18 minutes. And even though Salt Lake City is the center of business for the state, commutes last only about 20 minutes.

  • #40. Arkansas
    13/ Brandonrush // Wikimedia Commons

    #40. Arkansas

    - Mean travel time to work: 21.6 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 5%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 93.4%
    - Public transportation: 0.4%
    - Walk: 1.7%
    - Bicycle: 0.2%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1%

    Although just 0.2% of Arkansas residents bike to work, that number may be growing. The two-year period leading to 2018, a Walton Family Foundation study reported bike trail usage increased by 24% in northwest Arkansas to reach a total of more than 83,000 cyclists. A 37-mile bike trail, the Razorback Greenway, was completed in 2015, which has made traveling between the region's four largest cities more convenient.

  • #39. New Mexico
    14/ Marcin Wichary // Wikimedia Commons

    #39. New Mexico

    - Mean travel time to work: 21.8 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 5.2%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 90%
    - Public transportation: 1.1%
    - Walk: 2.1%
    - Bicycle: 0.8%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.2%

    New Mexico can partly attribute its easy commuting times to its desert climate, meaning that visibility-blocking precipitation is rare. Being ranked #4 for having the fewest days with precipitation was factored into a WalletHub study, which also found New Mexico has one of the lowest percent of rush-hour traffic congestion in the country.

  • #38. Wisconsin
    15/ (vincent desjardins) // Flickr

    #38. Wisconsin

    - Mean travel time to work: 22 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 4.7%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 89%
    - Public transportation: 1.9%
    - Walk: 3.2%
    - Bicycle: 0.7%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 0.9%

    In Milwaukee—Wisconsin's largest city—the average commute takes just 20 to 25 minutes, and workers in the area are the most likely out any other Wisconsinites to carpool, while 9% take advantage of public transportation. Of course, people who work from home can take advantage of the easiest commute of all: in Milwaukee, just 3% of employees work from home, but the highest percentage of remote workers is in Ozaukee County, where 6% of residents call the office home.

  • #37. Vermont
    16/ Wikimedia Commons

    #37. Vermont

    - Mean travel time to work: 22.8 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 5.5%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 84.8%
    - Public transportation: 1.2%
    - Walk: 5.6%
    - Bicycle: 0.7%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 0.9%

    Upwards of 75% of Vermonters drive to the office alone, and only 1 in 10 carpools, while just 1 in 100 takes public transportation and 1 in 20 Vermont residents walk to work, which is twice the national average. "When we think about how Vermont differs from other states, being able to live close to where we work, or being able to live relatively far away from where we work and not have an unusually long commute are some of Vermont's competitive advantages," wrote associate professor of economics at the University of Vermont Art Woolf in a 2015 Burlington Free Press article. 

  • #36. Kentucky
    17/ formulanone // Wikimedia Commons

    #36. Kentucky

    - Mean travel time to work: 23.1 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 5.5%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 91.8%
    - Public transportation: 1.1%
    - Walk: 2.3%
    - Bicycle: 0.2%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.2%

    In a study of the 30 largest U.S. cities, Michael Sivak at the UM Transportation Research Institute found that commuters from Louisville, Ky., were the oldest, with a median age of 41.7. The study also found Louisville is home to the highest percentage of workers that prefer to ride alone to the office, with 82.9% opting to take to the roads solo, compared with 21.4% in New York City. 

  • #35. Ohio
    18/ Tma169 // Wikimedia Commons

    #35. Ohio

    - Mean travel time to work: 23.4 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 5%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 91.1%
    - Public transportation: 1.6%
    - Walk: 2.2%
    - Bicycle: 0.3%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 0.9%

    Athens, Ohio, can boast the shortest commute time in the state, with an average travel time of just 13.3 minutes, followed by the cities of Sidney, Van Wert, Findlay, and Bowling Green, where the average commute is still only 17 minutes. However, not all of Ohio is created equal: residents of Pickerington and East Cleveland spend upwards of 30 minutes traveling to the office and have the worst commute times in the Buckeye State.

  • #34. Minnesota
    19/ Tony Webster // Wikimedia Commons

    #34. Minnesota

    - Mean travel time to work: 23.4 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 5.4%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 86.5%
    - Public transportation: 3.6%
    - Walk: 2.8%
    - Bicycle: 0.8%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 0.9%

    Although Minneapolis is Minnesota's largest city and a bustling hub for business, 64% of residents can get to work in less than 24 minutes. However, people in Minneapolis commuting to either St. Paul or the Mall of America can expect to spend much more time on the road, and commute times are only expected to increase between 2020 and 2030, which may explain why the city has become so accommodating to cyclists: Minneapolis in 2018 was ranked by Redfin as the country's most bike-friendly city.

  • #33. Indiana
    20/ Deb Nystrom // Flickr

    #33. Indiana

    - Mean travel time to work: 23.4 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 5.7%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 91.8%
    - Public transportation: 1%
    - Walk: 2.1%
    - Bicycle: 0.4%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1%

    The average commute time in Indiana's largest city, Indianapolis, is 24.8 minutes; although this is above the mean travel time in the state, it is still 1.6 minutes less than the national average. Near 92% of people in Indianapolis drive to work, but the city's bus system—IndyGo—racks up more than 10 million trips each year. Another option for commuters is BlueIndy, a program that has more than 200 stations with vehicles and electric cars available for one-way rentals.

  • #32. Missouri
    21/ Pxhere

    #32. Missouri

    - Mean travel time to work: 23.5 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 5.1%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 90.7%
    - Public transportation: 1.5%
    - Walk: 1.9%
    - Bicycle: 0.2%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1%

    Although 35% of Missourians travel outside of their county of residence for work, the state has slightly shorter commute times compared to the national average. In 2018 USA Today reported on a study by scientists, regulators, and builders in Missouri into a 700-mph commuter loop based on Elon Musk's design that would sidestep I-70's oppressive traffic corridor from Kansas City to St. Louis.

  • #31. Oregon
    22/ Oregon Department of Transportation // flickr

    #31. Oregon

    - Mean travel time to work: 23.5 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 6.3%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 81.7%
    - Public transportation: 4.5%
    - Walk: 3.8%
    - Bicycle: 2.3%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.1%

    Portland drivers are no stranger to stressful commutes. The city's commute time was ranked the fifth-worst in the country, and a study even found that in 2017 the average Portland driver spent 50 hours per year in peak rush-hour traffic. But those in Curry County on the western edge of the state have a much easier time getting to their desks, with an average commute time of just 14.1 minutes.

  • #30. Maine
    23/ AlexiusHoratius // Wikimedia Commons

    #30. Maine

    - Mean travel time to work: 23.8 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 6.4%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 88.2%
    - Public transportation: 0.6%
    - Walk: 3.9%
    - Bicycle: 0.4%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.1%

    Maine residents have a relatively easy commute to work overall, making it each way in less than 30 minutes on average. But without many major employers, some employees are forced to drive long distances across the state every day for jobs at places like L.L. Bean, Bath Iron Works, or government offices in Augusta. Some politicians have proposed reducing congestion on roads between Portland and Lewiston-Auburn by installing a commuter rail service. Route options for that service were recently discussed at a public meeting in March 2019.

  • #29. Nevada
    24/ Tony Webster // Wikimedia Commons

    #29. Nevada

    - Mean travel time to work: 24.0 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 5.1%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 88.6%
    - Public transportation: 3.5%
    - Walk: 2.0%
    - Bicycle: 0.4%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.7%

    Although most commuters choose to drive, residents of Las Vegas have plenty of travel options to choose from—some of which cost no money at all. The Las Vegas Downtown Loop is the city's free circulator bus, and those who work at the Excalibur, Mandalay Bay, or Luxor hotels, as well as the Park MGM, Crystal, and Bellagio, can even take a free tram. Commuters in a rush can also take the Las Vegas monorail system that can cover four miles of the city's downtown area in just 15 minutes, and those working the late shift can take the Las Vegas Deuce, which runs 24 hours a day.

  • #28. South Carolina
    25/ Wikipedian1234 // Wikimedia Commons

    #28. South Carolina

    - Mean travel time to work: 24.3 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 5.8%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 92.0%
    - Public transportation: 0.6%
    - Walk: 2.2%
    - Bicycle: 0.3%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.2%

    The longest commute in the Palmetto State belongs to Colleton County, where the mean travel time to get to work for those ages 16 and older is 33.4 minutes. On the other end of the spectrum, Cherokee County narrowly wins for the the shortest commute at just 20.4 minutes. In seeking relief for commuters in Charleston, a regional initiative of 18 orgaizations and companies have kicked off a "Reboot the Commute" campaign that centers around an online commuting resource offering alternative work and commuting options for corporations and workers including staggered shifts, carpooling, and working from home.

  • #27. North Carolina
    26/ Gerry Dincher // Wikimedia Commons

    #27. North Carolina

    - Mean travel time to work: 24.3 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 5.9%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 90.7%
    - Public transportation: 1.0%
    - Walk: 1.8%
    - Bicycle: 0.2%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.1%

    More than 4.2 million North Carolinians take to the road each week to head to the office, with commuters in 75 out of 100 counties traveling to an end destination within the same county they reside in. Efforts to relieve some commuters of their trek to work between Durham and Chapel Hill were dashed when a $3 billion light-rail project was killed in early spring 2019.

  • #26. Michigan
    27/ Ken Lund // flickr

    #26. Michigan

    - Mean travel time to work: 24.3 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 6.2%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 91.3%
    - Public transportation: 1.4%
    - Walk: 2.2%
    - Bicycle: 0.4%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 0.8%

    The average commute in Michigan has gotten almost a minute longer since 2005, according to MLive. All signs point to the time spent on the road increasing in the future, as is the case in most growing counties where cars are the primary mode of transportation for work purposes. That being said, residents of Macomb County take the lead for automobile-based commutes: 95% of residents there rely on a car to get to the office.

  • #25. Mississippi
    28/ Marduk // Wikimedia Commons

    #25. Mississippi

    - Mean travel time to work: 24.4 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 6.7%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 94.5%
    - Public transportation: 0.3%
    - Walk: 1.4%
    - Bicycle: 0.1%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.5%

    Mississippi ranked as the worst and most dangerous place to commute in the United States, according to a 2018 study by Zippia. The Magnolia State has the highest fatality rate in the country, with more than 34 deaths per 100,000 drivers. States that ranked as safer for commuters in the team's research had lower speed limits and more laws enforcing talking on the phone and texting while driving.

  • #24. Alabama
    29/ Tom Key // Wikimedia Commons

    #24. Alabama

    - Mean travel time to work: 24.6 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 6.1%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 94.4%
    - Public transportation: 0.4%
    - Walk: 1.1%
    - Bicycle: 0.1%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 0.9%

    Andalusia is the city with the shortest commute times in Alabama, where 62% of residents can get to work in less than 15 minutes, and the majority drive to the office alone. Washington D.C.-based research nonprofit TRIP reported in February 2019 that unmaintained and jammed roads and bridges throughout Alabama cost Alabama motorists on average $5.3 billion every year—or as much as $1,846 per driver.

  • #23. Rhode Island
    30/ PsyDad874 // Wikimedia Commons

    #23. Rhode Island

    - Mean travel time to work: 24.6 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 7.0%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 88.4%
    - Public transportation: 2.7%
    - Walk: 3.8%
    - Bicycle: 0.4%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 0.9%

    A full one-fifth of Rhode Island residents work in Providence, the state's largest city. But while the country's smallest state by area welcomes 57,104 commuters from other states or countries, Rhode Island also has close to 80,000 people living within its borders who travel to other states or countries for work.

  • #22. Tennessee
    31/ John0tron22 // Wikimedia Commons

    #22. Tennessee

    - Mean travel time to work: 24.8 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 6.2%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 92.5%
    - Public transportation: 0.7%
    - Walk: 1.4%
    - Bicycle: 0.1%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.1%

    Though only 1.4% of Tennessee residents walk to work, several cities—including Knoxville and Chattanooga—are trying to boost that number through commuter programs that reward workers for walking. Nashville and Memphis also have an inexpensive bikeshare program that makes it easy for locals to bike to the office, and Nashville even has several bike locker locations for those who own bikes.

  • #21. Arizona
    32/ Wars // Wikimedia Commons

    #21. Arizona

    - Mean travel time to work: 25.1 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 6.4%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 87.5%
    - Public transportation: 2.0%
    - Walk: 2.0%
    - Bicycle: 0.9%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.7%

    While Tempe remains the city with the shortest commute in Arizona at an average of just 20.9 minutes according to HomeArea.com, that time is only increasing (it's up from 20.2 minutes in 2015). Time spent on the road for Arizonans also increased in Scottsdale, Chandler, Phoenix, Peoria, and Glendale. Meanwhile, those living in Tucson, Mesa, and Gilbert actually saw a decrease in commute times during the same time period.

  • #20. Colorado
    33/ vxla // Wikimedia Commons

    #20. Colorado

    - Mean travel time to work: 25.2 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 7.0%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 84.3%
    - Public transportation: 3.2%
    - Walk: 2.9%
    - Bicycle: 1.2%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.0%

    While only a little more than 3% of Colorado residents rely on public transportation to get to work, that number could soon substantially increase throughout the state. A $7.4 billion project to expand the metropolitan Denver area's mass transit system is set to be complete this year and will be the largest simultaneous transit build-out in U.S. history once finished. Meanwhile, a $1.67 billion effort called the T-REX Project, which finished in 2006, opened additional highway lanes, bike and pedestrian trails, and a light rail to ease Denver commuters' woes.

  • #19. Louisiana
    34/ Didier Moïse // Wikimedia Commons

    #19. Louisiana

    - Mean travel time to work: 25.2 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 7.9%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 92.1%
    - Public transportation: 1.3%
    - Walk: 1.8%
    - Bicycle: 0.5%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.5%

    Workers in New Orleans use public transportation much more than the rest of the state to get to the office, with about 3% of residents opting to commute by bus or streetcar (even if it takes those folks around 40 minutes each way). Meanwhile, those living in Crescent City can enjoy a slightly better commute time compared to the rest of the state, at just 25 minutes. Surprisingly enough, Louisiana's major cities are not home to the state's longest average commute time overall: That distinction belongs to the town of Bunkie with 39.1 minutes, according to American Community Survey data.

  • #18. Delaware
    35/ Fan Railer // Wikimedia Commons

    #18. Delaware

    - Mean travel time to work: 25.7 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 7.9%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 89.4%
    - Public transportation: 2.8%
    - Walk: 2.1%
    - Bicycle: 0.3%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 0.8%

    Delaware is home to a number of “mega-commuters,” who are classified as workers that endure both at least a 50-mile journey to the office and a 90-minute one-way commute. In New Castle County about 13,000 residents travel through at least three different counties to get to work; but for some, the commute to work can cross state lines. About 248 people in New Castle County take the Amtrak train to New York City, while 231 people take the train to Washington D.C., and another 79 residents take another form of public transportation to get to places like Brooklyn or Arlington, Va.

  • #17. West Virginia
    36/ Famartin // Wikimedia Commons

    #17. West Virginia

    - Mean travel time to work: 25.7 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 9.2%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 91.9%
    - Public transportation: 0.9%
    - Walk: 2.9%
    - Bicycle: 0.1%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.0%

    Recent research found that commuting can be expensive in West Virginia, particularly in Charles Town and Martinsburg. Based on the average speed of a daily commute, cost of gas per gallon, and miles per gallon for the average car in West Virginia, Charles Town commuters spend $2,664 a year getting to the office, making it the most expensive commuter city in the state. Martinsburg clocked in with a $1,713 yearly commute, followed by Cross Lanes with a $1,590 annual commute.

  • #16. Connecticut
    37/ CTLegends135 // Wikimedia Commons

    #16. Connecticut

    - Mean travel time to work: 26.0 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 8.9%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 86.3%
    - Public transportation: 4.9%
    - Walk: 2.9%
    - Bicycle: 0.3%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 0.8%

    The average commute in Connecticut is unsurprisingly up from 25.5. minutes in 2013, but Fairfield County residents have it the worst with travel times at about 30 minutes, thanks to Interstate 95's presence within county lines. But the county also has the highest percentage of people who use public transportation, at 11.4%.

  • #15. Texas
    38/ J. P. Fagerback // Wikimedia Commons

    #15. Texas

    - Mean travel time to work: 26.1 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 8.1%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 90.8%
    - Public transportation: 1.5%
    - Walk: 1.6%
    - Bicycle: 0.3%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.4%

    A commute in Texas really depends on where you live: If you're from Garland, it could take you about 30 minutes to get to work; but for residents of Corpus Christi, Amarillo, Waco, or Lubbock, travel time to the office falls by roughly half. Commutes in north Texas are the longest in the state, thanks to the boom of the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area. Those who drive to work can expect to spend considerable time on the road in Arlington, Plano, Irving, and of course in Dallas and Fort Worth, as well.

  • #14. Pennsylvania
    39/ Ii2nmd // Wikimedia Commons

    #14. Pennsylvania

    - Mean travel time to work: 26.7 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 9.0%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 84.9%
    - Public transportation: 5.6%
    - Walk: 3.8%
    - Bicycle: 0.5%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 0.9%

    In Philadelphia (Pennsylvania's largest city) almost a fifth of residents traveled outside the city for a reverse commute to work. One reason for the high percentage of reverse commuters in Philadelphia is that the city is home to less than 30% of the region's jobs, putting it in the bottom five of major American cities. Regardless, Philly residents on average have shorter trips to work: Only 30% of residents traveling more than 10 miles for work.

  • #13. Florida
    40/ Michael Rivera // Wikimedia Commons

    #13. Florida

    - Mean travel time to work: 27.0 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 7.8%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 88.7%
    - Public transportation: 2.0%
    - Walk: 1.5%
    - Bicycle: 0.7%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.5%

    Floridian drivers prefer to drive alone to work, with the number of solo commuters in the Sunshine State climbing by almost 150,000 in 2016 alone, according to Florida Department of Transportation's Forecasting and Trends Office. Carpooling may now be on the rise, however: The percentage of ridesharers increased from 8.9% in 2015 to 9.2% in 2016, and it's the second-most common form of commuting in Floridain today. Meanwhile, more and more Florida residents experience no commute at all—the percentage of people working at home growing to a record high level of 6% in 2016.

  • #12. Washington
    41/ SounderBruce // Wikimedia Commons

    #12. Washington

    - Mean travel time to work: 27.1 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 9.5%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 82.3%
    - Public transportation: 6.3%
    - Walk: 3.6%
    - Bicycle: 0.9%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.2%

    Seattle landed just outside can count on at least a 30 minute commute, regardless of how she gets to work, landing the city just outside of the top 10 worst commutes in the country in 2017, according to census data. For 34.8% of those opting to take public transportation in the Emerald City, the journey to work takes more than an hour; but 17.7% of bus and light rail riders can boast a commute time less than Seattle's average time of 31 minutes.

  • #11. New Hampshire
    42/ formulanone // Wikimedia Commons

    #11. New Hampshire

    - Mean travel time to work: 27.2 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 9.8%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 88.9%
    - Public transportation: 0.9%
    - Walk: 2.8%
    - Bicycle: 0.3%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.0%

    Well over 106,000 New Hampshire residents commute to another state, while more than 65,000 people commute into the state for work. Two-thirds of New Hampshire workers commute to offices in three counties: Hillsborough, Rockingham, and Merrimack; with about a quarter working in either Manchester, Nashua, or Concord.

  • #10. Hawaii
    43/ MPD01605 // Wikimedia Commons

    #10. Hawaii

    - Mean travel time to work: 27.4 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 10.1%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 80.8%
    - Public transportation: 6.6%
    - Walk: 4.6%
    - Bicycle: 1.0%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 2.5%

    On Hawaii's largest island of Oahu, most jobs are concentrated near Pearl Harbor, Hickam Air Force Base, and Honolulu—while most affordable housing is concentrated near Ewa Beach, Mililani, and Kapolei on the west and central side of the island. That slows the island's main highways (H-1 and H-2) to a near-standstill most days at rush hour.

  • #9. Georgia
    44/ Atlantacitizen // Wikimedia Commons

    #9. Georgia

    - Mean travel time to work: 28.0 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 10.3%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 89.5%
    - Public transportation: 2.1%
    - Walk: 1.5%
    - Bicycle: 0.2%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.4%

    While Atlanta traffic is notoriously painful, the state of Georgia is attempting to make trips to work a little less joyless with a program called Georgia Commute Options that pays residents of metropolitan Atlanta to take more eco-friendly forms of transportation to work, including mass transit or carpooling. Commuters can earn $5 for every trip and are eligible for a monthly prize drawing. The program was started in 1996 when Atlanta hosted the Olympics to reduce traffic congestion.

  • #8. Virginia
    45/ Alex Wong // Getty Images

    #8. Virginia

    - Mean travel time to work: 28.2 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 10.3%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 86.6%
    - Public transportation: 4.4%
    - Walk: 2.4%
    - Bicycle: 0.4%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.3%

    About 10% of Virginians work in another state, commuting to and from places like Maryland and Washington D.C. on a daily basis. The peak commute time occurs between 7 and 8:30 a.m., with most Virginia residents choosing to drive alone. Among those who do so, most drivers spend only 15 or 20 minutes traveling to the office while fellow commuters often have an hour-long trip via public transportation.

  • #7. Illinois
    46/ STR/AFP // Getty Images

    #7. Illinois

    - Mean travel time to work: 28.7 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 11.5%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 81.3%
    - Public transportation: 9.4%
    - Walk: 3.0%
    - Bicycle: 0.6%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.1%

    The top city for commuting in Illinois is Macomb, where commuters spend just 14 minutes on average getting to work (perhaps due to the high percentage of people who carpool, at more than 11%). Quincy, Effingham, Carbondale, and Charleston can all also boast sub-20 minute commutes, which pale in comparison to the drive Riverdale residents face.

  • #6. California
    47/ Clotee Pridgen Alloc… // Wikimedia Commons

    #6. California

    - Mean travel time to work: 28.8 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 11.8%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 84.0%
    - Public transportation: 5.2%
    - Walk: 2.7%
    - Bicycle: 1.1%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.5%

    While California as a state does not have the longest commute in the country, the California city of Palmdale does: 35% of its residents spend more than two hours each day commuting. Many Palmdale locals have jobs in Los Angeles but face crowded roadways, with no major highways connecting the city to L.A. 

  • #5. Massachusetts
    48/ Pi.1415926535 // Wikimedia Commons

    #5. Massachusetts

    - Mean travel time to work: 29.3 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 12.3%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 78.1%
    - Public transportation: 10.2%
    - Walk: 4.8%
    - Bicycle: 0.8%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.1%

    While commutes in Massachusetts stand at more than 29 minutes, a decade ago they were a full two minutes shorter on average (that's six extra hours every year, for those keeping track). The uptick in commuting times can be attributed to the state's robust economy, which has provided people with more jobs, meaning more people traveling to the office. Additionally, because of high home prices in Boston and Cambridge, people have been forced to relocate further away from their jobs and thus face longer commutes.

  • #4. District of Columbia
    49/ Jeremy Segrott // flickr

    #4. District of Columbia

    - Mean travel time to work: 30.0 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 8.7%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 39.4%
    - Public transportation: 35.4%
    - Walk: 13.2%
    - Bicycle: 4.6%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.7%

    Washington, D.C. relies heavily on public transportation, and in particular, its subway system called the Metro, which is the second-largest heavy rail system in the United States. D.C. also operates the country's sixth-largest bus system. In 2017, more than 177 million trips were taken on the Metro, while more than 116 million trips were taken on D.C.'s bus system.

  • #3. New Jersey
    50/ Famartin // Wikimedia Commons

    #3. New Jersey

    - Mean travel time to work: 31.5 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 15.6%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 79.5%
    - Public transportation: 11.5%
    - Walk: 3.0%
    - Bicycle: 0.3%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.5%

    New Jersey is home to 1.9 million commuters, half of whom leave their home counties Monday through Friday to get to work. The vast majority commute to New York City, with around 300,000 crossing the Hudson River to do so each day, according to census data. The second most common destination for commuters is Essex County, followed by Middlesex and Bergen counties that welcome more than 100,000 workers each day. 

  • #2. Maryland
    51/ AndrewHome // GoodFreePhotos

    #2. Maryland

    - Mean travel time to work: 32.7 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 15.4%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 82.9%
    - Public transportation: 8.8%
    - Walk: 2.4%
    - Bicycle: 0.3%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.1%

    Not only is Maryland home to some of the longest commutes in the country, it is also home to the most expensive commute in the U.S. Charles County takes the cake for the priciest trips to the office, where residents spent 388 hours—or two and a half weeks—commuting in 2017 and devoted almost 20% of their income to commuting costs. About 28% of people living in Charles County reportedly hit the roads before 6 a.m. just to get to work on time and avoid traffic congestion.

  • #1. New York
    52/ Pxhere

    #1. New York

    - Mean travel time to work: 33.0 minutes
    - Workers with 60 min+ commute: 17.6%

    Transportation method:
    - Car, truck, or van: 59.5%
    - Public transportation: 28.2%
    - Walk: 6.3%
    - Bicycle: 0.7%
    - Taxicab, motorcycle, or other: 1.2%

    New York City sees commutes like no other metropolis, with the city's population doubling during the workday from about 1.6 million to 3.1 million. Certain parts of Manhattan see more traffic than others during the work week, such as the Financial District and Midtown, which increase their populations by four and 10 times respectively. Meanwhile, those working in the Lower East Side might see less congestion, since the area is mostly residential, and trends show that people leave and enter the neighborhood at the same rate.

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