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Can you answer these real 'Jeopardy!' clues about your state?

  • Can you answer these real 'Jeopardy!' clues about your state?

    “Jeopardy!” has been a television staple since the mid-1960s, emerging from the game show scandals of the 1950s. The Golden Age of Television might be best known for classics like “I Love Lucy,” “Gunsmoke,” and “The Honeymooners,” but the real network darlings were quiz shows. “Twenty-One,” “$64,000 Questions,” and dozens of others supplied huge boosts to network ratings while being cheap to make. In an effort to manufacture tension on these beloved shows, producers started coaching the majority of contestants, eventually leading to a national scandal and an act of Congress that banned producers from rigging their shows.

    “Jeopardy!” creator Merv Griffin came up with the unique format for the show after his wife Julann jokingly suggested that if network producers were afraid of someone giving the contestants the answers, he should give them the answers and ask for the questions. Network executives thought the show was too difficult, but decided to give it a chance anyway. The risk paid off: The show was a hit that survived two cancellations and roared back with a 1983 iteration featuring Alex Trebek as host that fans still know and love today. The show has refused to dumb down its material, and its high standards have awarded “Jeopardy!” with the most Emmy wins by a game show and a staggering 9.4 million viewers a week.

    For fans looking to play along at home without waiting for the next episode, Stacker combed through the fan-created Jeopardy Archive updated through February 2019 and found three clues for all 50 states (excluding Washington D.C.) from the questions curated there. States are listed in alphabetical order, and clue topics cover art, state history, and weird state facts—with everything in between. 

    Click through to put your state knowledge to the test and see if you have what it takes to someday be a "Jeopardy!" champion. Don't worry; in this quiz, you don't have to answer in the form of a question.

    You may also like: Facts about every state that will make you smile 

  • Alabama: Clues

    Question #1: In Greek myth, this river flows by Hades; in reality, it's in Alabama.

    Question #2: If you're visiting the White House—the first White House of the Confederacy, that is—you're in this city.

    Question #3: This praline ingredient is Alabama's state nut.

  • Alabama: Answers

    Question #1: In Greek myth, this river flows by Hades; in reality, it's in Alabama.

    Answer: Styx

    Question #2: If you're visiting the White House—the first White House of the Confederacy, that is—you're in this city.

    Answer: Montgomery

    Question #3: This praline ingredient is Alabama's state nut.

    Answer: Pecan

  • Alaska: Clues

    Question #1: His "Icebox" and his "Folly" were nicknames for the purchase of Alaska.

    Question #2: Haines, Alaska's museum of this tool features exhibits on handle making and "five ways to not hit your fingers.”

    Question #3: Because they can see Alaska from their dachas, the Russians call this peak Bolshaya Gora ("great mountain").

  • Alaska: Answers

    Question #1: His "Icebox" and his "Folly" were nicknames for the purchase of Alaska.

    Answer: Seward's

    Question #2: Haines, Alaska's museum of this tool features exhibits on handle making and "five ways to not hit your fingers.”

    Answer: Hammers

    Question #3: Because they can see Alaska from their dachas, the Russians call this peak Bolshaya Gora ("great mountain").

    Answer: Denali (or Mount McKinley)

  • Arizona: Clues

    Question #1: Arizona's Petrified Forest is mostly this type of tree that has four vowels in a row.

    Question #2: This city grew up around a flagpole erected to celebrate the U.S. Centennial of 1876.

    Question #3: Around 1,905 these animals, not native to Arizona, were brought to a ranch in the state, where they now roam.

  • Arizona: Answers

    Question #1: Arizona's Petrified Forest is mostly this type of tree that has four vowels in a row.

    Answer: Sequoia

    Question #2: This city grew up around a flagpole erected to celebrate the U.S. Centennial of 1876.

    Answer: Flagstaff

    Question #3: Around 1905 these animals, not native to Arizona, were brought to a ranch in the state, where they now roam.

    Answer: Buffalo

  • Arkansas: Clues

    Question #1: Arkansas has made the pink variety of this its state fruit and its state vegetable, just in case.

    Question #2: In 1957, federal troops had to escort the first black students to this Little Rock high school.

    Question #3: This weapon named for a frontiersman has also been called the "Arkansas toothpick."

  • Arkansas: Answers

    Question #1: Arkansas has made the pink variety of this its state fruit and its state vegetable, just in case.

    Answer: Tomato

    Question #2: In 1957, federal troops had to escort the first black students to this Little Rock high school.

    Answer: Central High School

    Question #3: This weapon named for a frontiersman has also been called the "Arkansas toothpick.”

    Answer: Bowie knife

  • California: Clues

    Question #1: This gastropod mollusk is the official mascot of the University of California at Santa Cruz.

    Question #2: Both Spain's and California's highest mountain peaks are in a range called this.

    Question #3: John Steinbeck's "East of Eden" plays out its Cain and Abel parable in this California valley.

  • California: Answers

    Question #1: This gastropod mollusk is the official mascot of the University of California at Santa Cruz.

    Answer: A banana slug called "Sammy the Slug"

    Question #2: Both Spain's and California's highest mountain peaks are in a range called this.

    Answer: Sierra Nevada

    Question #3: John Steinbeck's "East of Eden" plays out its Cain and Abel parable in this California valley.

    Answer: Salinas Valley

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