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Can you answer these real 'Jeopardy!' clues about your state?

  • Can you answer these real 'Jeopardy!' clues about your state?
    1/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Can you answer these real 'Jeopardy!' clues about your state?

    “Jeopardy!” has been a television staple since the mid-1960s, emerging from the game show scandals of the 1950s. The Golden Age of Television might be best known for classics like “I Love Lucy,” “Gunsmoke,” and “The Honeymooners,” but the real network darlings were quiz shows. “Twenty-One,” “$64,000 Questions,” and dozens of others supplied huge boosts to network ratings while being cheap to make. In an effort to manufacture tension on these beloved shows, producers started coaching the majority of contestants, eventually leading to a national scandal and an act of Congress that banned producers from rigging their shows.

    “Jeopardy!” creator Merv Griffin came up with the unique format for the show after his wife Julann jokingly suggested that if network producers were afraid of someone giving the contestants the answers, he should give them the answers and ask for the questions. Network executives thought the show was too difficult, but decided to give it a chance anyway. The risk paid off: The show was a hit that survived two cancellations and roared back with a 1983 iteration featuring Alex Trebek as host that fans still know and love today. The show has refused to dumb down its material, and its high standards have awarded “Jeopardy!” with the most Emmy wins by a game show and a staggering 9.4 million viewers a week. The beloved host has just announced his diagnosis of stage 4 pancreatic cancer in a short video—and his plan to fight and win. He wittily points out he has no choice; he is required to host the show for three more years under the terms of his contract and plans to continue working.

    For fans looking to play along at home without waiting for the next episode, Stacker combed through the fan-created Jeopardy Archive updated through February 2019 and found three clues for all 50 states (excluding Washington D.C.) from the questions curated there. States are listed in alphabetical order, and clue topics cover art, state history, and weird state facts—with everything in between. 

    Click through to put your state knowledge to the test and see if you have what it takes to someday be a "Jeopardy!" champion. Don't worry; in this quiz, you don't have to answer in the form of a question.

    You may also like: Facts about every state that will make you smile 

  • Alabama: Clues
    2/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Alabama: Clues

    Question #1: In Greek myth, this river flows by Hades; in reality, it's in Alabama.

    Question #2: If you're visiting the White House—the first White House of the Confederacy, that is—you're in this city.

    Question #3: This praline ingredient is Alabama's state nut.

  • Alabama: Answers
    3/ Scott Bauer // Wikimedia Commons

    Alabama: Answers

    Question #1: In Greek myth, this river flows by Hades; in reality, it's in Alabama.

    Answer: Styx

    Question #2: If you're visiting the White House—the first White House of the Confederacy, that is—you're in this city.

    Answer: Montgomery

    Question #3: This praline ingredient is Alabama's state nut.

    Answer: Pecan

  • Alaska: Clues
    4/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Alaska: Clues

    Question #1: His "Icebox" and his "Folly" were nicknames for the purchase of Alaska.

    Question #2: Haines, Alaska's museum of this tool features exhibits on handle making and "five ways to not hit your fingers.”

    Question #3: Because they can see Alaska from their dachas, the Russians call this peak Bolshaya Gora ("great mountain").

  • Alaska: Answers
    5/ Nic McPhee // Wikimedia Commons

    Alaska: Answers

    Question #1: His "Icebox" and his "Folly" were nicknames for the purchase of Alaska.

    Answer: Seward's

    Question #2: Haines, Alaska's museum of this tool features exhibits on handle making and "five ways to not hit your fingers.”

    Answer: Hammers

    Question #3: Because they can see Alaska from their dachas, the Russians call this peak Bolshaya Gora ("great mountain").

    Answer: Denali (or Mount McKinley)

  • Arizona: Clues
    6/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Arizona: Clues

    Question #1: Arizona's Petrified Forest is mostly this type of tree that has four vowels in a row.

    Question #2: This city grew up around a flagpole erected to celebrate the U.S. Centennial of 1876.

    Question #3: Around 1905 these animals, not native to Arizona, were brought to a ranch in the state, where they now roam.

  • Arizona: Answers
    7/ Jack Dykinga // Wikimedia Commons

    Arizona: Answers

    Question #1: Arizona's Petrified Forest is mostly this type of tree that has four vowels in a row.

    Answer: Sequoia

    Question #2: This city grew up around a flagpole erected to celebrate the U.S. Centennial of 1876.

    Answer: Flagstaff

    Question #3: Around 1905 these animals, not native to Arizona, were brought to a ranch in the state, where they now roam.

    Answer: Buffalo

  • Arkansas: Clues
    8/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Arkansas: Clues

    Question #1: Arkansas has made the pink variety of this its state fruit and its state vegetable, just in case.

    Question #2: In 1957, federal troops had to escort the first black students to this Little Rock high school.

    Question #3: This weapon named for a frontiersman has also been called the "Arkansas toothpick."

  • Arkansas: Answers
    9/ US Army // Wikimedia Commons

    Arkansas: Answers

    Question #1: Arkansas has made the pink variety of this its state fruit and its state vegetable, just in case.

    Answer: Tomato

    Question #2:

    Answer: Central High School

    Question #3: This weapon named for a frontiersman has also been called the "Arkansas toothpick.”

    Answer: Bowie knife

  • California: Clues
    10/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    California: Clues

    Question #1: This gastropod mollusk is the official mascot of the University of California at Santa Cruz.

    Question #2: Both Spain's and California's highest mountain peaks are in a range called this.

    Question #3: John Steinbeck's "East of Eden" plays out its Cain and Abel parable in this California valley.

  • California: Answers
    11/ Sean Lema // Shutterstock

    California: Answers

    Question #1: This gastropod mollusk is the official mascot of the University of California at Santa Cruz.

    Answer: Banana slug

    Question #2: Both Spain's and California's highest mountain peaks are in a range called this.

    Answer: Sierra Nevada

    Question #3: John Steinbeck's "East of Eden" plays out its Cain and Abel parable in this California valley.

    Answer: Salinas Valley

  • Colorado: Clues
    12/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Colorado: Clues

    Question #1: The view from this Colorado summit inspired the song "America the Beautiful.”

    Question #2: During prohibition, this Golden, Colo., company switched to selling malted milk.

    Question #3: In 2005 this journalist went out with a bang; his ashes were shot from a cannon near his Colorado home.

  • Colorado: Answers
    13/ Hogs555 // Wikimedia Commons

    Colorado: Answers

    Question #1: The view from this Colorado summit inspired the song "America the Beautiful.”

    Answer: Pike's Peak

    Question #2: During prohibition, this Golden, Colo., company switched to selling malted milk.

    Answer: Coors

    Question #3: In 2005 this journalist went out with a bang; his ashes were shot from a cannon near his Colorado home.

    Answer: Hunter S. Thompson

  • Connecticut: Clues
    14/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Connecticut: Clues

    Question #1: Harriet Beecher Stowe lived next door to this other great American author at the time he wrote "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court.”

    Question #2: This generic name for a small town comes from a Native American tribe of Connecticut.

    Question #3: A tick-transmitted infection, it gets its name from a Connecticut town.

  • Connecticut: Answers
    15/ skeeze // Pixabay

    Connecticut: Answers

    Question #1: Harriet Beecher Stowe lived next door to this other great American author at the time he wrote "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court.”

    Answer: Mark Twain

    Question #2: This generic name for a small town comes from a Native American tribe of Connecticut.

    Answer: Podunk

    Question #3: A tick-transmitted infection, it gets its name from a Connecticut town.

    Answer: Lyme disease

  • Delaware: Clues
    16/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Delaware: Clues

    Question #1: On Dec. 7, 1787, Delaware became the first state to do this.

    Question #2: At #15 [Forbes wealthiest families of the U.S.], this Delaware family shares $14.3 billion in chemical money—but they share it among more than 3,500 members.

    Question #3: In 2004 it was high "time" Delaware's Winterthur Museum paid $1.65 million for a 9-foot-tall one of these.

  • Delaware: Answers
    17/ Ken Lund // Wikimedia Commons

    Delaware: Answers

    Question #1: On Dec. 7, 1787, Delaware became the first state to do this.

    Answer: Ratify the Constitution

    Question #2: At #15 [Forbes wealthiest families of the U.S.], this Delaware family shares $14.3 billion in chemical money—but they share it among more than 3,500 members.

    Answer: Du Pont

    Question #3: In 2004 it was high "time" Delaware's Winterthur Museum paid $1.65 million for a 9-foot-tall one of these.

    Answer: A grandfather clock

  • Florida: Clues
    18/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Florida: Clues

    Question #1: This Florida city was named in 1909 in hopes it would attract canal traffic from Central America.

    Question #2: Florida Sen. Bill Nelson took a long, high route to the Hill; he was a crewman on the 24th flight of one of these.

    Question #3: In July bring your beard to this Florida island for its Hemingway Days and you might win a look-alike contest.

  • Florida: Answers
    19/ paulbr75 // Pixabay

    Florida: Answers

    Question #1: This Florida city was named in 1909 in hopes it would attract canal traffic from Central America.

    Answer: Panama City

    Question #2: Florida Sen. Bill Nelson took a long, high route to the Hill; he was a crewman on the 24th flight of one of these.

    Answer: The space shuttle

    Question #3: In July bring your beard to this Florida island for its Hemingway Days and you might win a look-alike contest.

    Answer: Key West

  • Georgia: Clues
    20/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Georgia: Clues

    Question #1: In 1916 Georgia Tech beat Cumberland College 222-0 in this sport.

    Question #2: James Oglethorpe founded Georgia in 1733 as a haven for people in trouble for this back in Britain.

    Question #3: Born in Georgia, this notorious frontier dentist first had a practice in Atlanta.

  • Georgia: Answers
    21/ Wikimedia Commons

    Georgia: Answers

    Question #1: In 1916 Georgia Tech beat Cumberland College 222-0 in this sport.

    Answer: Football

    Question #2: James Oglethorpe founded Georgia in 1733 as a haven for people in trouble for this back in Britain.

    Answer: Debt

    Question #3: Born in Georgia, this notorious frontier dentist first had a practice in Atlanta.

    Answer: Doc Holliday

  • Hawaii: Clues
    22/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Hawaii: Clues

    Question #1: He graduated from the Punahou Prep School in 1979 before moving on to Occidental and Columbia.

    Question #2: Ulysses Grant's dinner for King Kalakaua of these islands (including Hawaii) likely didn't include the food of that name.

    Question #3: The site of a leper colony, this Hawaiian island is nicknamed the "Friendly Island."

  • Hawaii: Answers
    23/ Tech. Sgt. Aaron Oelrich // U.S. Air Force

    Hawaii: Answers

    Question #1: He graduated from the Punahou Prep School in 1979 before moving on to Occidental and Columbia.

    Answer: Barack Obama

    Question #2: Ulysses Grant's dinner for King Kalakaua of these islands (including Hawaii) likely didn't include the food of that name.

    Answer: The Sandwich Islands

    Question #3: The site of a leper colony, this Hawaiian island is nicknamed the "Friendly Island."

    Answer: Molokai

  • Idaho: Clues
    24/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Idaho: Clues

    Question #1: Appropriately, Apollo 14 astronauts trained at the Idaho monument with this four-word name.

    Question #2: The name Idaho was nearly given to this other state, whose current name means "colored red."

    Question #3: Aptly, this toy got four write-in votes in Boise, Idaho's 1985 mayoral election.

  • Idaho: Answers
    25/ Doug Kerr // Wikimedia Commons

    Idaho: Answers

    Question #1: Appropriately, Apollo 14 astronauts trained at the Idaho monument with this four-word name.

    Answer: Craters of the Moon

    Question #2: The name Idaho was nearly given to this other state, whose current name means "colored red."

    Answer: Colorado

    Question #3: Aptly, this toy got four write-in votes in Boise, Idaho's 1985 mayoral election.

    Answer: Mr. Potato Head

  • Illinois: Clues
    26/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Illinois: Clues

    Question #1: The first public one of these schools began in Illinois in 1901 for students who wanted to pursue higher education in their home area.

    Question #2: Chicagoans were advised by Illinois' attorney general to beware of phony invitations to tapings of this woman's TV show.

    Question #3: This Illinois village where Abraham Lincoln lived has been rebuilt and is now a state park.

  • Illinois: Answers
    27/ yolibetancourt // Pixabay

    Illinois: Answers

    Question #1: The first public one of these schools began in Illinois in 1901 for students who wanted to pursue higher education in their home area.

    Answer: Community college

    Question #2: Chicagoans were advised by Illinois' attorney general to beware of phony invitations to tapings of this woman's TV show.

    Answer: Oprah

    Question #3: This Illinois village where Abraham Lincoln lived has been rebuilt and is now a state park.

    Answer: New Salem

  • Indiana: Clues
    28/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Indiana: Clues

    Question #1: South Bend, Ind., is home to a museum dedicated to this bygone automobile company.

    Question #2: In 1934 this notorious criminal escaped from a jail in Crown Point, Ind., by using a fake gun carved from wood.

    Question #3: The earliest known use of this term was in an Indianapolis Star opinion piece of Sept. 20, 1914.

  • Indiana: Answers
    29/ order_242 // Wikimedia Commons

    Indiana: Answers

    Question #1: South Bend, Ind., is home to a museum dedicated to this bygone automobile company.

    Answer: Studebaker

    Question #2: In 1934 this notorious criminal escaped from a jail in Crown Point, Ind., by using a fake gun carved from wood.

    Answer: John Dillinger

    Question #3: The earliest known use of this term was in an Indianapolis Star opinion piece of Sept. 20, 1914.

    Answer: First World War

  • Iowa: Clues
    30/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Iowa: Clues

    Question #1: Since 1911, the Iowa State Fair has featured one of these sculpted from 600 pounds of pure cream butter.

    Question #2: This artist from Iowa once said, "All the really good ideas I'd ever had came to me while I was milking a cow.”

    Question #3: "The Music Man" takes place "right here in" this Iowa city.

  • Iowa: Answers
    31/ Carol VanHook // Wikimedia Commons

    Iowa: Answers

    Question #1: Since 1911, the Iowa State Fair has featured one of these sculpted from 600 pounds of pure cream butter.

    Answer: A butter cow

    Question #2: This artist from Iowa once said, "All the really good ideas I'd ever had came to me while I was milking a cow.”

    Answer: Grant Wood

    Question #3: "The Music Man" takes place "right here in" this Iowa city.

    Answer: River City

  • Kansas: Clues
    32/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Kansas: Clues

    Question #1: To mark the launch of Pokemon, Kansas' capital was renamed this for a day in 1998.

    Question #2: A Coffeyville museum tells of the 1892 attempted bank robbery by this gang and how they got shot up by the citizenry.

    Question #3: This Kansan made her last known take-off from New Guinea; if you find out where she is, let us know.

  • Kansas: Answers
    33/ Harris and Ewing // Wikimedia Commons

    Kansas: Answers

    Question #1: To mark the launch of Pokemon, Kansas' capital was renamed this for a day in 1998.

    Answer: ToPikachu

    Question #2: A Coffeyville museum tells of the 1892 attempted bank robbery by this gang and how they got shot up by the citizenry.

    Answer: The Dalton Boys

    Question #3: This Kansan made her last known take-off from New Guinea; if you find out where she is, let us know.

    Answer: Amelia Earhart

  • Kentucky: Clues
    34/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Kentucky: Clues

    Question #1: Not cotton, but this rope-making plant was king in antebellum Kentucky, which grew almost all the United State's supply.

    Question #2: In an effort to save money, the Kentucky Coal Museum recently switched to this source of renewable energy.

    Question #3: In 1935 Kentucky's governor gave this restaurant founder his "rank.”

  • Kentucky: Answers
    35/ Attercop311 // Wikimedia Commons

    Kentucky: Answers

    Question #1: Not cotton, but this rope-making plant was king in antebellum Kentucky, which grew almost all the United State's supply.

    Answer: Hemp

    Question #2: In an effort to save money, the Kentucky Coal Museum recently switched to this source of renewable energy.

    Answer: Solar

    Question #3: In 1935 Kentucky's governor gave this restaurant founder his "rank.”

    Answer: Col. Sanders

  • Louisiana: Clues
    36/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Louisiana: Clues

    Question #1: On May 21, 1934, this duo attended a party at Black Lake, La.; two days later, they were killed by the law.

    Question #2: Until the 1970s Louisiana had the longest of these in the U.S., containing over a quarter-million words.

    Question #3: The Vieux Carre section of New Orleans is better known as this.

  • Louisiana: Answers
    37/ Phil Roeder // flickr

    Louisiana: Answers

    Question #1: On May 21, 1934, this duo attended a party at Black Lake, La.; two days later, they were killed by the law.

    Answer: Bonnie and Clyde

    Question #2: Until the 1970s Louisiana had the longest of these in the U.S., containing over a quarter-million words.

    Answer: State constitution

    Question #3: The Vieux Carre section of New Orleans is better known as this.

    Answer: The French Quarter

  • Maine: Clues
    38/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Maine: Clues

    Question #1: After alcohol was made illegal in Maine, vendors offered swigs from concealed pints in their pants and got this nickname.

    Question #2: The International Museum of this -ology in Maine has exhibits for the Montauk Monster and the Jersey Devil.

    Question #3: In 2017 the Maine farm and barn that inspired this classic 1952 novel were put up for sale.

  • Maine: Answers
    39/ Wikimedia Commons

    Maine: Answers

    Question #1: After alcohol was made illegal in Maine, vendors offered swigs from concealed pints in their pants and got this nickname.

    Answer: Bootleggers

    Question #2: The International Museum of this -ology in Maine has exhibits for the Montauk Monster and the Jersey Devil.

    Answer: Cryptozoology

    Question #3: In 2017 the Maine farm and barn that inspired this classic 1952 novel were put up for sale.

    Answer: “Charlotte's Web”

  • Maryland: Clues
    40/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Maryland: Clues

    Question #1: In 1981 he was ordered to pay Maryland $250,000 to compensate for bribes taken while governor and vice president.

    Question #2: Fittingly, this Maryland fort was built in a star shape.

    Question #3: At his death in 1832, Charles Carroll of Maryland was the last surviving signer of this document.

  • Maryland: Answers
    41/ National Parks Service // Wikimedia Commons

    Maryland: Answers

    Question #1: In 1981 he was ordered to pay Maryland $250,000 to compensate for bribes taken while governor and vice president.

    Answer: Spiro Agnew

    Question #2: Fittingly, this Maryland fort was built in a star shape.

    Answer: Fort McHenry

    Question #3: At his death in 1832, Charles Carroll of Maryland was the last surviving signer of this document.

    Answer: The Declaration of Independence

  • Massachusetts: Clues
    42/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Massachusetts: Clues

    Question #1: Danvers, Mass., has a memorial for those who died after being accused of this in the late 17th century.

    Question #2: Rumors that these snacks were named for a physicist are untrue; they're named for a town in Massachusetts.

    Question #3: The epitaph on this poet's grave marker in Amherst, Mass., simply says, "Called Back.”

  • Massachusetts: Answers
    43/ Wikimedia Commons

    Massachusetts: Answers

    Question #1: Danvers, Mass., has a memorial for those who died after being accused of this in the late 17th century.

    Answer: Witchcraft

    Question #2: Rumors that these snacks were named for a physicist are untrue; they're named for a town in Massachusetts.

    Answer: Fig Newtons

    Question #3: The epitaph on this poet's grave marker in Amherst, Massachusetts simply says, "Called Back.”

    Answer: Emily Dickinson

  • Michigan: Clues
    44/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Michigan: Clues

    Question #1: Because of its portrayal of the Jewish character Shylock, this play was banned in Michigan in 1980.

    Question #2: The public is only allowed to use buggies, bikes, and saddle horses on this Michigan resort island.

    Question #3: The American Chronicle says that in 1924 half a million people wrote this Michigander asking for money.

  • Michigan: Answers
    45/ Steppinstars // Pixabay

    Michigan: Answers

    Question #1: Because of its portrayal of the Jewish character Shylock, this play was banned in Michigan in 1980.

    Answer: “Merchant of Venice”

    Question #2: The public is only allowed to use buggies, bikes, and saddle horses on this Michigan resort island.

    Answer: Mackinac Island

    Question #3: The American Chronicle says that in 1924 half a million people wrote this Michigander asking for money.

    Answer: Henry Ford

  • Minnesota: Clues
    46/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Minnesota: Clues

    Question #1: This renowned Minnesota institution opened its own med school in 1972.

    Question #2: At Austin, Minn.'s Museum of this Hormel product, featuring a wall of more than 3,000 cans.

    Question #3: This St. Paul company began by mining corundum, then making sandpaper and masking tape.

  • Minnesota: Answers
    47/ Ken Wolter // Shutterstock

    Minnesota: Answers

    Question #1: This renowned Minnesota institution opened its own med school in 1972.

    Answer: The Mayo Clinic

    Question #2: At Austin, Minn.'s Museum of this Hormel product, featuring a wall of more than 3,000 cans.

    Answer: Spam

    Question #3: This St. Paul company began by mining corundum, then making sandpaper and masking tape.

    Answer: 3M

  • Mississippi: Clues
    48/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Mississippi: Clues

    Question #1: Named for the Mississippi area it served, this airline began in 1924 as a crop-dusting service.

    Question #2: As the Broadway musical told you, Mississippi came from the Chippewa word meaning this.

    Question #3: In "Mississippi Squirrel Revival," Ray Stevens rhymes "hallelujah" with this city that's in the state.

  • Mississippi: Answers
    49/ Aero Icarus // flickr

    Mississippi: Answers

    Question #1: Named for the Mississippi area it served, this airline began in 1924 as a crop-dusting service.

    Answer: Delta Airlines

    Question #2: As the Broadway musical told you, Mississippi came from the Chippewa word meaning this.

    Answer: Big river

    Question #3: In "Mississippi Squirrel Revival," Ray Stevens rhymes "hallelujah" with this city that's in the state.

    Answer: Pascagoula

  • Missouri: Clues
    50/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Missouri: Clues

    Question #1: This Missouri man who loved to work for peanuts also developed a type of synthetic marble made from wood shavings.

    Question #2: The "Top 10 News Topics of 2014" included unrest in this Missouri suburb.

    Question #3: With more than 40 theaters and 100 live shows, this city calls itself the "live music show capital of the world.”

  • Missouri: Answers
    51/ Loavesofbread // Wikimedia Commons

    Missouri: Answers

    Question #1: This Missouri man who loved to work for peanuts also developed a type of synthetic marble made from wood shavings.

    Answer: George Washington Carver

    Question #2: The "Top 10 News Topics of 2014" included unrest in this Missouri suburb.

    Answer: Ferguson

    Question #3: With more than 40 theaters and 100 live shows, this city calls itself the "live music show capital of the world.”

    Answer: Branson

  • Montana: Clues
    52/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Montana: Clues

    Question #1: This Montana site was designated a national cemetery in 1879; it became a national monument in 1946.

    Question #2: There are about 25 of these in the Montana national park named for them.

    Question #3: Helena's valley is named after this alliterative plant; William Clark was injured by many of its barbs when he explored there.

  • Montana: Answers
    53/ Ken Bosma // flickr

    Montana: Answers

    Question #1: This Montana site was designated a national cemetery in 1879; it became a national monument in 1946.

    Answer: Little Big Horn

    Question #2: There are about 25 of these in the Montana national park named for them.

    Answer: Glaciers

    Question #3: Helena's valley is named after this alliterative plant; William Clark was injured by many of its barbs when he explored there.

    Answer: Prickly pear

  • Nebraska: Clues
    54/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Nebraska: Clues

    Question #1: The name Nebraska comes from an Oto native American word meaning "flat water," referring to this river.

    Question #2: I'm in the nation's only one-house state legislature known by this one-word term. Nebraskans chose it by popular vote in the 1930s.

    Question #3: Officially "The Tree Planters' State" in 1895, in 1945 it became this "State" to honor University of Nebraska athletic teams.

  • Nebraska: Answers
    55/ Jefrey Beall // Wikimedia Commons

    Nebraska: Answers

    Question #1: The name Nebraska comes from an Oto native American word meaning "flat water," referring to this river.

    Answer: The Platte

    Question #2: I'm in the nation's only one-house state legislature known by this one-word term. Nebraskans chose it by popular vote in the 1930s.

    Answer: Unicameral

    Question #3: Officially "The Tree Planters' State" in 1895, in 1945 it became this "State" to honor University of Nebraska athletic teams.

    Answer: The Cornhusker State

  • Nevada: Clues
    56/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Nevada: Clues

    Question #1: In 1909, the legislature passed laws making this illegal; in 1931, they changed their minds.

    Question #2: The 1850s discovery of this "lode" named for a prospector set off a silver rush in Nevada.

    Question #3: The first live telecast of one of these originated in Nevada on April 22, 1952.

  • Nevada: Answers
    57/ National Nuclear Security Administration/Nevada Site Office // Wikimedia Commons

    Nevada: Answers

    Question #1: In 1909, the legislature passed laws making this illegal; in 1931, they changed their minds.

    Answer: Gambling

    Question #2: The 1850s discovery of this "lode" named for a prospector set off a silver rush in Nevada.

    Answer: The Comstock lode

    Question #3: The first live telecast of one of these originated in Nevada on April 22, 1952.

    Answer: A nuclear explosion (or detonation)

  • New Hampshire: Clues
    58/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    New Hampshire: Clues

    Question #1: After 12,000 years staring out over New Hampshire, this senior citizen succumbed in 2003.

    Question #2: Some officials in New Hampshire were unhappy that the title of this action film was a play on the state motto.

    Question #3: In 1818 Daniel Webster argued before the Supreme Court to stop New Hampshire from taking over this private college.

  • New Hampshire: Answers
    59/ Jeffrey Joseph // Wikimedia Commons

    New Hampshire: Answers

    Question #1: After 12,000 years staring out over New Hampshire, this senior citizen succumbed in 2003.

    Answer: The Old Man of the Mountain

    Question #2: Some officials in New Hampshire were unhappy that the title of this action film was a play on the state motto.

    Answer: Live Free or Die Hard

    Question #3: In 1818 Daniel Webster argued before the Supreme Court to stop New Hampshire from taking over this private college.

    Answer: Dartmouth

  • New Jersey: Clues
    60/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    New Jersey: Clues

    Question #1: This ex-"Daily Show" host was born in New York City, but was raised in New Jersey, part of the great Jewish emigration of 1963.

    Question #2: New Jersey's last royal governor was an illegitimate son of this Philadelphia printer-inventor.

    Question #3: "Newark Athlete," an experimental film from 1891, was made at his lab in West Orange, N.J.

  • New Jersey: Answers
    61/ Chief National Guard Bureau // flickr

    New Jersey: Answers

    Question #1: This ex-"Daily Show" host was born in New York City, but was raised in New Jersey, part of the great Jewish emigration of 1963.

    Answer: Jon Stewart

    Question #2: New Jersey's last royal governor was an illegitimate son of this Philadelphia printer-inventor.

    Answer: Benjamin Franklin

    Question #3: "Newark Athlete," an experimental film from 1891, was made at his lab in West Orange, New Jersey.

    Answer: Thomas Edison

  • New Mexico: Clues
    62/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    New Mexico: Clues

    Question #1: New Mexico has an official state question, "Red or green?"—it refers to these edibles.

    Question #2: New Mexico's acquiring statehood in 1912 didn't stop his gang from raiding the town of Columbus in 1916.

    Question #3: The Bradbury Science Museum in this New Mexico city displays replicas of the two atomic bombs used in WWII.

  • New Mexico: Answers
    63/ Saunpa // Pixabay

    New Mexico: Answers

    Question #1: New Mexico has an official state question, "Red or green?"—it refers to these edibles.

    Answer: Chili peppers

    Question #2: New Mexico's acquiring statehood in 1912 didn't stop his gang from raiding the town of Columbus in 1916.

    Answer: Pancho Villa

    Question #3: The Bradbury Science Museum in this New Mexico city displays replicas of the two atomic bombs used in WWII.

    Answer: Los Alamos

  • New York: Clues
    64/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    New York: Clues

    Question #1: Start spreading the news: New York has an official muffin that's made with this state fruit.

    Question #2: To convince New Yorkers it was safe, this impresario led 21 elephants across the Brooklyn Bridge in 1883.

    Question #3: A New York bridge that gets you to Staten Island is named for this privateer turned explorer.

  • New York: Answers
    65/ Max Pixel

    New York: Answers

    Question #1: Start spreading the news: New York has an official muffin that's made with this state fruit.

    Answer: An apple

    Question #2: To convince New Yorkers it was safe, this impresario led 21 elephants across the Brooklyn Bridge in 1883.

    Answer: P.T. Barnum

    Question #3: A New York bridge that gets you to Staten Island is named for this privateer turned explorer.

    Answer: Verrazzano

  • North Carolina: Clues
    66/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    North Carolina: Clues

    Question #1: Established in 1837 by Quakers, Guilford College did not allow this until 1887; finally, glee club!

    Question #2: This cape, the southern tip of Smith Island, lends its name to a scary film and its remake.

    Question #3: North Carolina has held a festival of these flowers since 1948.

  • North Carolina: Answers
    67/ Wouter Hagens // Wikimedia Commons

    North Carolina: Answers

    Question #1: Established in 1837 by Quakers, Guilford College did not allow this until 1887; finally, glee club!

    Answer: Singing

    Question #2: This cape, the southern tip of Smith Island, lends its name to a scary film and its remake.

    Answer: Cape Fear

    Question #3: North Carolina has held a festival of these flowers since 1948.

    Answer: Azaleas

  • North Dakota: Clues
    68/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    North Dakota: Clues

    Question #1: This disease of little sores on the skin nearly wiped out North Dakota's "Three Tribes" in 1837.

    Question #2: This Rough Rider is seen astride a horse on the 2016 quarter for the North Dakota national park named for him.

    Question #3: The University of North Dakota's "Lux et Lex" means "Light and" this.

  • North Dakota: Answers
    69/ Wikimedia Commons

    North Dakota: Answers

    Question #1: This disease of little sores on the skin nearly wiped out North Dakota's "Three Tribes" in 1837.

    Answer: Smallpox

    Question #2: This Rough Rider is seen astride a horse on the 2016 quarter for the North Dakota national park named for him.

    Answer: Theodore Roosevelt

    Question #3: The University of North Dakota's "Lux et Lex" means "Light and" this.

    Answer: Law

  • Ohio: Clues
    70/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Ohio: Clues

    Question #1: A July 21, 1969, Wapakoneta, Ohio, Daily News headline about a local boy read, "Neil steps on" this.

    Question #2: Little Turtle fought off U.S. troops as a chief of this Ohio (not Florida) tribe.

    Question #3: Churchill called this largest city on the Ohio River the most beautiful of the inland cities of the Union.

  • Ohio: Answers
    71/ Gregory H. Revera // Wikimedia Commons

    Ohio: Answers

    Question #1: A July 21, 1969, Wapakoneta, Ohio, Daily News headline about a local boy read, "Neil steps on" this.

    Answer: The moon

    Question #2: Little Turtle fought off U.S. troops as a chief of this Ohio (not Florida) tribe.

    Answer: Miami

    Question #3: Churchill called this largest city on the Ohio River the most beautiful of the inland cities of the Union.

    Answer: Cincinnati

  • Oklahoma: Clues
    72/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Oklahoma: Clues

    Question #1: Oklahoma has a panhandle because Texas couldn't have land north of 36°30' north or it would have had to free its slaves under this 1820 deal.

    Question #2: The state didn't repeal this until 1959, years after the Eighteenth Amendment was repealed.

    Question #3: The resolution making this largest North American frog Oklahoma's state amphibian says it makes a "jug-o-rum" sound.

  • Oklahoma: Answers
    73/ Carl D. Howe // Wikimedia Commons

    Oklahoma: Answers

    Question #1: Oklahoma has a panhandle because Texas couldn't have land north of 36°30' north or it would have had to free its slaves under this 1820 deal.

    Answer: Missouri Compromise

    Question #2: The state didn't repeal this until 1959, years after the Eighteenth Amendment was repealed.

    Answer: Prohibition

    Question #3: The resolution making this largest North American frog Oklahoma's state amphibian says it makes a "jug-o-rum" sound.

    Answer: The bullfrog

  • Oregon: Clues
    74/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Oregon: Clues

    Question #1: The town of Fossil once held annual "Days" of these departed reptiles, but the event is now extinct.

    Question #2: Writing in his journal in January 1806, he gave Clark's Mountain, Ore., its name.

    Question #3: While president, Teddy Roosevelt established five national parks, including this one "deep" in Oregon.

  • Oregon: Answers
    75/ Jeffrey Johnson // Wikimedia Commons

    Oregon: Answers

    Question #1: The town of Fossil once held annual "Days" of these departed reptiles, but the event is now extinct.

    Answer: Dinosaur

    Question #2: Writing in his journal in January 1806, he gave Clark's Mountain, Ore., its name.

    Answer: Meriwether Lewis

    Question #3: While president, Teddy Roosevelt established five national parks, including this one "deep" in Oregon.

    Answer: Crater Lake National Park

  • Pennsylvania: Clues
    76/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Pennsylvania: Clues

    Question #1: Although called a state, Pennsylvania is actually this, as are Kentucky, Massachusetts, and Virginia.

    Question #2: The state's name means Penn's these.

    Question #3: Established in 1881, The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania was the world's first collegiate school of this.

  • Pennsylvania: Answers
    77/ GoodFreePhotos

    Pennsylvania: Answers

    Question #1: Although called a state, Pennsylvania is actually this, as are Kentucky, Massachusetts, and Virginia.

    Answer: Commonwealth

    Question #2: The state's name means Penn's these.

    Answer: Woods (sylvania)

    Question #3: Established in 1881, The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania was the world's first collegiate school of this.

    Answer: Business

  • Rhode Island: Clues
    78/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Rhode Island: Clues

    Question #1: This founder of Rhode Island has his own memorial in Providence.

    Question #2: Known for its jazz festival, this Rhode Island city also has a Greek festival and a chowder cook-off.

    Question #3: Before the Europeans, a few thousand of these Indians lived on the Rhode Island bay that shares their name.

  • Rhode Island: Answers
    79/ Doc Searls // Wikimedia Commons

    Rhode Island: Answers

    Question #1: This founder of Rhode Island has his own memorial in Providence.

    Answer: Roger Williams

    Question #2: Known for its jazz festival, this Rhode Island city also has a Greek festival and a chowder cook-off.

    Answer: Newport

    Question #3: Before the Europeans, a few thousand of these Indians lived on the Rhode Island bay that shares their name.

    Answer: Narragansett

  • South Carolina: Clues
    80/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    South Carolina: Clues

    Question #1: This three-layered "feminine" white cake filled with fruit and nuts was created in South Carolina, not Maryland.

    Question #2: This influential modern jazz trumpeter was born in Cheraw, S.C., in 1917.

    Question #3: Graduates of this military college in Charleston, S.C., fired the first shots at Fort Sumter to begin the Civil War.

  • South Carolina: Answers
    81/ The Library of Congress // flickr

    South Carolina: Answers

    Question #1: This three-layered "feminine" white cake filled with fruit and nuts was created in South Carolina, not Maryland.

    Answer: Lady Baltimore cake

    Question #2: This influential modern jazz trumpeter was born in Cheraw, S.C., in 1917.

    Answer: Dizzy Gillespie

    Question #3: Graduates of this military college in Charleston, S.C., fired the first shots at Fort Sumter to begin the Civil War.

    Answer: The Citadel

  • South Dakota: Clues
    82/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    South Dakota: Clues

    Question #1: The Badlands in South Dakota is home to the black-footed type of this weasel, back from the brink of extinction.

    Question #2: A colossal statue of this Sioux chief was begun officially on a South Dakota mountain in 1948; it's still not done.

    Question #3: A historic site in South Dakota contains the launch control facility and a silo for one of these Cold War ICBMs.

  • South Dakota: Answers
    83/ Max Pixel

    South Dakota: Answers

    Question #1: The Badlands in South Dakota is home to the black-footed type of this weasel, back from the brink of extinction.

    Answer: Ferret

    Question #2: A colossal statue of this Sioux chief was begun officially on a South Dakota mountain in 1948; it's still not done.

    Answer: Crazy Horse

    Question #3: A historic site in South Dakota contains the launch control facility and a silo for one of these Cold War ICBMs.

    Answer: A minuteman missile

  • Tennessee: Clues
    84/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Tennessee: Clues

    Question #1: "The Tennessee Tailor" was a nickname of this president who was a tailor in Tennessee.

    Question #2: Governor during Reconstruction, William Brownlow mobilized the Tennessee guard to crush this then-new hate group.

    Question #3: In March 1925 the Butler Act was passed, prohibiting the teaching of this in Tennessee schools.

  • Tennessee: Answers
    85/ Wellcome Library // Wikimedia Commons

    Tennessee: Answers

    Question #1: "The Tennessee Tailor" was a nickname of this president who was a tailor in Tennessee.

    Answer: Andrew Johnson

    Question #2: Governor during Reconstruction, William Brownlow mobilized the Tennessee guard to crush this then-new hate group.

    Answer: The Ku Klux Klan

    Question #3: In March 1925, the Butler Act was passed, prohibiting the teaching of this in Tennessee schools.

    Answer: Evolution

  • Texas: Clues
    86/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Texas: Clues

    Question #1: This "medicinal" soft drink was created in 1885 at Morrison's old corner drugstore in Waco.

    Question #2: On Nov. 22, 1963 around 1:45 p.m., he was arrested at the Texas Theatre, about an hour and 15 minutes after his crime.

    Question #3: In 2007 Robstown, near Corpus Christi, was recognized as the birthplace of this game, now played online, too.

  • Texas: Answers
    87/ Kucher Serhii // Shutterstock

    Texas: Answers

    Question #1: This "medicinal" soft drink was created in 1885 at Morrison's old corner drugstore in Waco.

    Answer: Dr. Pepper

    Question #2: On Nov. 22, 1963 around 1:45 PM, he was arrested at the Texas Theatre, about an hour and 15 minutes after his crime.

    Answer: Lee Harvey Oswald

    Question #3: In 2007 Robstown, near Corpus Christi, was recognized as the birthplace of this game, now played online too.

    Answer: Texas Hold ‘Em

  • Utah: Clues
    88/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Utah: Clues

    Question #1: In 1982 the University of Utah Hospital was where the first permanent artificial this organ was implanted.

    Question #2: To demonstrate the acoustics in this Salt Lake City building, tour guides will drop a pin.

    Question #3: Having saved early Mormon settlers from an invasion of katydids, it's now the state bird.

  • Utah: Answers
    89/ Tama66 // Pixabay

    Utah: Answers

    Question #1: In 1982 the University of Utah Hospital was where the first permanent artificial this organ was implanted.

    Answer: Heart

    Question #2: To demonstrate the acoustics in this Salt Lake City building, tour guides will drop a pin.

    Answer: The Mormon Tabernacle

    Question #3: Having saved early Mormon settlers from an invasion of katydids, it's now the state bird.

    Answer: The seagull

  • Vermont: Clues
    90/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Vermont: Clues

    Question #1: In 1777 Vermont became the first state to abolish this completely.

    Question #2: Maria, the last of the original seven siblings of this musical troupe, passed away in Vermont in 2014 at age 99.

    Question #3: First formed to drive New York settlers out of Vermont, this armed band later gained fame at Fort Ticonderoga.

  • Vermont: Answers
    91/ Larry Gordon/Trapp Family Singers // Wikimedia Commons

    Vermont: Answers

    Question #1: In 1777 Vermont became the first state to abolish this completely.

    Answer: Slavery

    Question #2: Maria, the last of the original seven siblings of this musical troupe, passed away in Vermont in 2014 at age 99.

    Answer: The von Trapps

    Question #3: First formed to drive New York settlers out of Vermont, this armed band later gained fame at Fort Ticonderoga.

    Answer: The Green Mountain Boys

  • Virginia: Clues
    92/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Virginia: Clues

    Question #1: After this pirate aka Edward Teach died in 1718, his head was taken to Virginia and displayed on a pole.

    Question #2: In 1716 Virginia's governor claimed possession of this scenic valley for England.

    Question #3: Patrick Henry slept at the governor's palace in what's now this Virginia tourist mecca.

  • Virginia: Answers
    93/ Jeffry N. Curtis // flickr

    Virginia: Answers

    Question #1: After this pirate aka Edward Teach died in 1718, his head was taken to Virginia and displayed on a pole.

    Answer: Blackbeard

    Question #2: In 1716 Virginia's governor claimed possession of this scenic valley for England.

    Answer: Shenandoah Valley

    Question #3: Patrick Henry slept at the governor's palace in what's now this Virginia tourist mecca.

    Answer: Williamsburg

  • Washington: Clues
    94/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Washington: Clues

    Question #1: The postmark for letters and postcards for the Seattle World's Fair in 1962 featured this landmark.

    Question #2: This president may not be famous for much, but he did sign the 1853 bill creating the Washington Territory.

    Question #3: The state gem is this fossil; the best place to see it in Washington is a state park in Vantage.

  • Washington: Answers
    95/ 12019 // Pixabay

    Washington: Answers

    Question #1: The postmark for letters and postcards for the Seattle World's Fair in 1962 featured this landmark.

    Answer: The Space Needle

    Question #2: This president may not be famous for much, but he did sign the 1853 bill creating the Washington Territory.

    Answer: Millard Fillmore

    Question #3: The state gem is this fossil; the best place to see it in Washington is a state park in Vantage.

    Answer: Petrified wood

  • West Virginia: Clues
    96/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    West Virginia: Clues

    Question #1: In 1921 West Virginia became the first state to impose this, then a fraction of 1%; today it's 6%.

    Question #2: The John Brown Wax Museum in this town has 87 life-size figures telling his story from youth to the gallows.

    Question #3: Alphabetically, this West Virginia family once led by a man named "Devil Anse" comes before their Pike County, Ky., rivals.

  • West Virginia: Answers
    97/ Wikimedia Commons

    West Virginia: Answers

    Question #1: In 1921 West Virginia became the first state to impose this, then a fraction of 1%; today it's 6%.

    Answer: Sales tax

    Question #2: The John Brown Wax Museum in this town has 87 life-size figures telling his story from youth to the gallows.

    Answer: Harpers Ferry

    Question #3: Alphabetically, this West Virginia family once led by a man named "Devil Anse" comes before their Pike County, Ky., rivals.

    Answer: The Hatfields

  • Wisconsin: Clues
    98/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Wisconsin: Clues

    Question #1: Baraboo, the former winter home of this company, is home to a circus museum.

    Question #2: This nickname for Wisconsin folks goes back to lead miners who lived in holes in the ground or hillsides.

    Question #3: New Glarus, Wis., known as "Little" this country, has a Heidi festival every June.

  • Wisconsin: Answers
    99/ Bureau of Land Management // flickr

    Wisconsin: Answers

    Question #1: Baraboo, the former winter home of this company, is home to a circus museum.

    Answer: Ringling Brothers

    Question #2: This nickname for Wisconsin folks goes back to lead miners who lived in holes in the ground or hillsides.

    Answer: Badgers

    Question #3: New Glarus, Wis., known as "Little" this country, has a Heidi festival every June.

    Answer: Switzerland

  • Wyoming: Clues
    100/ Amanda Edwards // Getty

    Wyoming: Clues

    Question #1: The Indian paintbrush has this official designation in Wyoming; no, it's not the state paintbrush.

    Question #2: "Geographical" term for Jim Bridger, Jedediah Smith, and others who trapped in the state.

    Question #3: In 1925 Nellie Tayloe Ross became the first woman to hold this office in the U.S.

  • Wyoming: Answers
    101/ Gary M Stolz/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service // Wikimedia Commons

    Wyoming: Answers

    Question #1: The Indian paintbrush has this official designation in Wyoming; no, it's not the state paintbrush.

    Answer: State flower

    Question #2: "Geographical" term for Jim Bridger, Jedediah Smith, and others who trapped in the state.

    Answer: Mountain men

    Question #3: In 1925 Nellie Tayloe Ross became the first woman to hold this office in the U.S.

    Answer: Governor

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