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Top industries in every state

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r.classen // Shutterstock

Top industries in every state

The United States economy is the largest on the planet, contributing almost a quarter of the gross domestic product (GDP) to the world's total economic activity each year. The country’s manufacturing sector is also a global powerhouse, responsible for the production of 18.2% of goods produced internationally and 11.6% of U.S. economic output overall. Still, some signs point to the historically popular industry shrinking: More than 60,000 U.S. manufacturing facilities have closed since 2001.

Stacker mined 2018 data from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) to compile the top 10 industries in every state, ranked by each industry's contribution to the GDP. The data only analyzed private enterprises and not government business. In some cases, we’ve also included information about each state's economy as a whole, of which GDP is one factor. The biggest boons to U.S. economic growth in the second quarter of 2019 came from professional, scientific, and technical services; real estate and rental and leasing; and mining, according to the BEA’s data. Although manufacturing is the top industry in the country overall, it only ranked first in 17 states.

Industries comprise sectors defined by the North American Industry Classification System, the standard federal agencies use to classify businesses to analyze data. Similar sectors, such as educational services, health care, and social assistance sectors, were combined into one industry for classification purposes. Some industries may appear noticeably lacking in the top 10 from certain states (agriculture from Mississippi, for example). The reason for this is that the BEA’s data represent direct contributions to the GDP, leaving off other sources of financial infusion to that industry such as government payments (and the aforementioned government business, as these numbers reflect private industry only).

Read on to find out which industries in your home state are the most lucrative.

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Melinda Shelton // Wikimedia Commons

Alabama

- Top industries:
- #1. Manufacturing ($37.6 billion, #23 among all states)
- #2. Real estate and rental and leasing ($23.6 billion, #29)
- #3. Professional and business services ($22 billion, #27)
- #4. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($17.7 billion, #27)
- #5. Retail trade ($15.3 billion, #25)
- #6. Finance and insurance ($13.2 billion, #27)
- #7. Wholesale trade ($12.4 billion, #28)
- #8. Construction ($7.8 billion, #30)
- #9. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($7.2 billion, #30)
- #10. Utilities ($6.5 billion, #17)

Alabama’s highest-growing job sectors from 2010 to 2017 were administrative and waste services, accommodation and food service, arts and entertainment, and manufacturing and transportation. Fortune 500 company Regions Financial—a bank and financial services company—is headquartered in Birmingham.

Alabama boasts higher-paid manufacturing jobs than other manufacturing-heavy states like Mississippi and remains an attractive option for employers. Mazda Toyota Manufacturing in 2018 announced plans to sink $1.6 billion into an SUV plant in Huntsville that would employ up to 4,000 people when it opens in 2021 (construction is currently underway).

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Bureau of Safetyand Environmental Enforcement BSEE // Wikimedia Commons

Alaska

- Top industries:
- #1. Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction ($9.3 billion, #9 among all states)
- #2. Transportation and warehousing ($7.4 billion, #28)
- #3. Real estate and rental and leasing ($5.2 billion, #47)
- #4. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($4.5 billion, #49)
- #5. Professional and business services ($3.3 billion, #47)
- #6. Retail trade ($2.3 billion, #49)
- #7. Construction ($2 billion, #49)
- #8. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($1.9 billion, #48)
- #9. Manufacturing ($1.8 billion, #50)
- #10. Wholesale trade ($1.4 billion, #50)

Alaska has the highest unemployment rate of any state, a fact economists say was exacerbated by $444 million in vetoes put forward by Gov. Mike Dunleavy in June 2019. Those erasures of line items (182 in all) from the state’s operating budget are widely expected to result in higher taxes and extensive public-sector job losses numbering between 4,500 and 7,000, according to one analysis by the Institute of Social and Economic Research.

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Max Pixel

Arizona

- Top industries:
- #1. Real estate and rental and leasing ($54.2 billion, #17 among all states)
- #2. Professional and business services ($39.7 billion, #20)
- #3. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($34 billion, #19)
- #4. Manufacturing ($28.9 billion, #27)
- #5. Finance and insurance ($25.1 billion, #19)
- #6. Retail trade ($24.4 billion, #14)
- #7. Wholesale trade ($19.5 billion, #21)
- #8. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($16.6 billion, #18)
- #9. Construction ($16.3 billion, #17)
- #10. Information ($12.3 billion, #19)

After Arizona officially became a state in 1912, the mining industry exploded and remained the top industry until the 1950s. Today, tourism is Arizona’s #1 export industry, with 45.5 million visitors flocking there from all over the world in 2018, bringing $24.4 billion to the state. Best Western is headquartered in Arizona, along with Cold Stone Creamery, GoDaddy, and U-Haul.

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Department of Energy // flickr

Arkansas

- Top industries:
- #1. Manufacturing ($19.3 billion, #32 among all states)
- #2. Professional and business services ($13.8 billion, #33)
- #3. Real estate and rental and leasing ($13.4 billion, #35)
- #4. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($12.1 billion, #33)
- #5. Wholesale trade ($9.7 billion, #32)
- #6. Retail trade ($8.9 billion, #35)
- #7. Finance and insurance ($6.3 billion, #38)
- #8. Transportation and warehousing ($5.4 billion, #35)
- #9. Construction ($4.8 billion, #36)
- #10. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($4.2 billion, #37)

Manufacturing jobs represent 12.7% of Arkansas' workforce and have climbed 8% since 2014—two full percentage points above the national average.

The state also produces half of the rice in the United States. Transportation and logistics are also an important contributor to the state's economy, employing over 85,000 people at more than 80 distribution centers and 22 major trucking centers. But the top export in Arkansas is Aerospace, which adds $1.8 billion annually to the state's economy.

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Jawed Karim // Wikimedia Commons

California

- Top industries:
- #1. Real estate and rental and leasing ($504 billion, #1 among all states)
- #2. Professional and business services ($397.3 billion, #1)
- #3. Manufacturing ($320.7 billion, #1)
- #4. Information ($287.8 billion, #1)
- #5. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($218.3 billion, #1)
- #6. Wholesale trade ($158.2 billion, #1)
- #7. Finance and insurance ($155.6 billion, #2)
- #8. Retail trade ($153.4 billion, #1)
- #9. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($130 billion, #1)
- #10. Construction ($111.3 billion, #1)

California has the largest economy in the United States and is home to some of the largest entertainment and fashion industries in the country. However, computer and electronic products straight from Silicon Valley bring in some of the most cash to California's economy.

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NPS photo

Colorado

- Top industries:
- #1. Real estate and rental and leasing ($55.2 billion, #16 among all states)
- #2. Professional and business services ($54.6 billion, #16)
- #3. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($26.7 billion, #23)
- #4. Manufacturing ($25.8 billion, #29)
- #5. Finance and insurance ($21.9 billion, #21)
- #6. Construction ($21.2 billion, #14)
- #7. Wholesale trade ($20.5 billion, #20)
- #8. Information ($20.2 billion, #11)
- #9. Retail trade ($19.1 billion, #20)
- #10. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($19.1 billion, #15)

Colorado's economy is evenly split in its landscape, with the farming industry operating in the eastern part of the state, the urban areas playing host to services and manufacturing, and the Rocky Mountains providing recreation areas, as well as petroleum and coal deposits. Within the services industry, which comprises the largest portion of the state's gross product, the top moneymakers are community, business, and personal services. The finance industry is another big contributor, with the state capital of Denver serving as an important financial and regional bank hub.

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Dannel Mallow // flickr

Connecticut

- Top industries:
- #1. Real estate and rental and leasing ($40 billion, #20 among all states)
- #2. Finance and insurance ($37.7 billion, #12)
- #3. Professional and business services ($33.7 billion, #21)
- #4. Manufacturing ($29.7 billion, #26)
- #5. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($28.6 billion, #22)
- #6. Wholesale trade ($17.7 billion, #23)
- #7. Retail trade ($13.8 billion, #26)
- #8. Information ($13.6 billion, #16)
- #9. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($9.4 billion, #28)
- #10. Construction ($8.2 billion, #29)

There are over 1,200 digital media companies doing business in Connecticut, including ESPN, which is headquartered in Bristol. Advanced manufacturing, bioscience, green technology, insurance, and financial services are among the other top industries in Connecticut and continue to grow. Three Fortune 500 companies—Cigna, Aetna, and United Technologies—also have headquarters in the state.

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Littleinfo // Wikimedia Commons

Delaware

- Top industries:
- #1. Finance and insurance ($21.9 billion, #22 among all states)
- #2. Real estate and rental and leasing ($10.6 billion, #41)
- #3. Professional and business services ($8.5 billion, #38)
- #4. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($6 billion, #44)
- #5. Manufacturing ($4.8 billion, #43)
- #6. Construction ($2.8 billion, #43)
- #7. Retail trade ($2.8 billion, #47)
- #8. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($2.1 billion, #46)
- #9. Wholesale trade ($2 billion, #47)
- #10. Transportation and warehousing ($1.2 billion, #48)

Wilmington is the heart of Delaware’s economy, serving as home to DuPont Co. and other large manufacturers. The smaller agricultural industry is still vitally important to Delaware's economy, and the state is a leading producer of broiler chickens while potatoes, soybeans, corn, and dairy products are also top exports. The state's proximity to the Atlantic Ocean also has given rise to tourism at places like Rehoboth and Bethany beaches and has significantly expanded the fishing industry with the growing export of crabs, clams, and oysters.

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Pixabay

Florida

- Top industries:
- #1. Real estate and rental and leasing ($172.5 billion, #4 among all states)
- #2. Professional and business services ($136.6 billion, #4)
- #3. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($100 billion, #4)
- #4. Retail trade ($74 billion, #3)
- #5. Wholesale trade ($70.8 billion, #4)
- #6. Finance and insurance ($66.4 billion, #5)
- #7. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($63.7 billion, #4)
- #8. Manufacturing ($56.2 billion, #13)
- #9. Construction ($55.1 billion, #3)
- #10. Information ($41.6 billion, #7)

The Sunshine State is the world’s biggest travel destination and attributes 10% of its GDP to tourism alone, which is no surprise considering Florida's sunny beaches, theme parks, cruise ship ports, and golf courses. The incredibly successful tourism industry allows Florida to be one of only seven states with no state income tax. The southeastern region of the state leads the state's farming industry, producing about two-thirds of the oranges in the United States, in addition to a steady supply of winter vegetables.

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sailn1 // flickr

Georgia

- Top industries:
- #1. Real estate and rental and leasing ($74.1 billion, #11 among all states)
- #2. Professional and business services ($72.8 billion, #11)
- #3. Manufacturing ($63.3 billion, #11)
- #4. Finance and insurance ($47.8 billion, #10)
- #5. Information ($46.2 billion, #6)
- #6. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($45.3 billion, #12)
- #7. Wholesale trade ($45 billion, #7)
- #8. Retail trade ($32 billion, #11)
- #9. Transportation and warehousing ($25.3 billion, #7)
- #10. Construction ($24.8 billion, #8)

Although most Georgians work in the service industry, the state's economy has roots in the agricultural sector. Even today, one in seven workers in Georgia toils in agricultural fields, where cotton, peanuts, pecans, eggs, and of course, the famous Georgia peaches are harvested. The state's roots in cotton have also contributed to a rich textile industry today, especially in smaller cities like Macon, Rome, and Augusta.

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Mariamichelle // Pixabay

Hawaii

- Top industries:
- #1. Real estate and rental and leasing ($18.9 billion, #34 among all states)
- #2. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($9.6 billion, #27)
- #3. Professional and business services ($8 billion, #40)
- #4. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($7.2 billion, #42)
- #5. Retail trade ($6.1 billion, #37)
- #6. Construction ($5.4 billion, #34)
- #7. Transportation and warehousing ($5.2 billion, #36)
- #8. Finance and insurance ($3.4 billion, #44)
- #9. Wholesale trade ($2.8 billion, #45)
- #10. Other services (except government and government enterprises) ($2.1 billion, #38)

Tourism is the economic backbone of Hawaii, supplying most of the state's jobs and $1.96 billion in 2017 tax revenue. That same year, visitor spending in Hawaii reached $16.78 billion. The median household income in Hawaii also healthily above the national average at $74,511. Defense is also a large part of the Hawaiian economy: Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine, and Coast Guard bases are located on the islands.

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ARLittleRock // Wikimedia Commons

Idaho

- Top industries:
- #1. Real estate and rental and leasing ($10.7 billion, #40 among all states)
- #2. Manufacturing ($8.6 billion, #37)
- #3. Professional and business services ($8 billion, #41)
- #4. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($7 billion, #43)
- #5. Retail trade ($6 billion, #38)
- #6. Construction ($5.1 billion, #35)
- #7. Wholesale trade ($4.6 billion, #39)
- #8. Finance and insurance ($3.5 billion, #42)
- #9. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($3.1 billion, #41)
- #10. Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting ($3.1 billion, #18)

Idaho is famous for its potatoes for good reason—the state supplies almost 30% of all potatoes in the United States. The entire agricultural industry is particularly strong in Idaho, but the health care and food processing industries are also growing quickly. The revenue for the health care industry in Idaho has risen 46% in the past 10 years and is projected to add another 36% in the upcoming years, putting Idaho at second in the country for health care growth.

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Ron Frazier // flickr

Illinois

- Top industries:
- #1. Professional and business services ($118.4 billion, #5 among all states)
- #2. Real estate and rental and leasing ($108.9 billion, #5)
- #3. Manufacturing ($107.7 billion, #4)
- #4. Finance and insurance ($88.7 billion, #4)
- #5. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($75.6 billion, #6)
- #6. Wholesale trade ($67.4 billion, #5)
- #7. Retail trade ($41.5 billion, #6)
- #8. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($36 billion, #5)
- #9. Transportation and warehousing ($35.2 billion, #4)
- #10. Construction ($30.4 billion, #6)

Business is booming in Illinois despite a recent population decline, and the state houses the headquarters of Walgreens, Boeing, State Farm, Sears, and United. Illinois is also a significant leader in clean energy and has several wind farms, as well as ethanol fuel production. However, the largest industries in the state are manufacturing, education, agriculture, energy, and biotechnology.

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ArtisticOperations // Pixabay

Indiana

- Top industries:
- #1. Manufacturing ($100.7 billion, #6 among all states)
- #2. Real estate and rental and leasing ($36.3 billion, #23)
- #3. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($35 billion, #18)
- #4. Professional and business services ($31.7 billion, #23)
- #5. Finance and insurance ($21.2 billion, #25)
- #6. Wholesale trade ($20.6 billion, #19)
- #7. Retail trade ($20.1 billion, #17)
- #8. Construction ($14.1 billion, #19)
- #9. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($13.5 billion, #20)
- #10. Transportation and warehousing ($13.2 billion, #17)

The top industry in the Hoosier State is manufacturing, which contributes more gross product to Indiana than most other states. Indiana is a leading manufacturer of transportation equipment and houses a number of automobile plants that assemble cars, motor vehicle parts, and truck and bus bodies. However, the state generates most of its revenue through the service industry, which is mostly comprised of wholesale and retail trade.

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Phil Roeder // Wikimedia Commons

Iowa

- Top industries:
- #1. Manufacturing ($33.6 billion, #25 among all states)
- #2. Finance and insurance ($25.9 billion, #18)
- #3. Real estate and rental and leasing ($19.5 billion, #32)
- #4. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($14.4 billion, #30)
- #5. Professional and business services ($12.7 billion, #34)
- #6. Wholesale trade ($11.4 billion, #29)
- #7. Retail trade ($9.9 billion, #33)
- #8. Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting ($8.5 billion, #3)
- #9. Construction ($7.7 billion, #31)
- #10. Transportation and warehousing ($6.4 billion, #32)

Despite having a population of just 3 million, Iowa goes big with its industries. The state is serious about farming and is the biggest U.S. producer of hogs. Iowa is also a leading producer of livestock, beef cattle, milk, chicken, and eggs. Besides agriculture, manufacturing is another leading industry, and in particular, food processing. The state is home to one of the nation's largest cereal mills, as well as the biggest popcorn-processing plant.

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Bluemoose // Wikimedia Commons

Kansas

- Top industries:
- #1. Manufacturing ($27.6 billion, #28 among all states)
- #2. Real estate and rental and leasing ($20.2 billion, #31)
- #3. Professional and business services ($18.1 billion, #30)
- #4. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($13.7 billion, #31)
- #5. Wholesale trade ($11 billion, #31)
- #6. Retail trade ($10.1 billion, #32)
- #7. Finance and insurance ($9.2 billion, #34)
- #8. Transportation and warehousing ($7.2 billion, #29)
- #9. Information ($6.5 billion, #26)
- #10. Construction ($6.3 billion, #33)

Kansas is another important agricultural state and ranks seventh in the nation for total agricultural production. The state is the top wheat producer in the nation, and the crop accounts for 12% of Kansas' total agriculture. However, mining is also an important industry in Kansas, and almost every county in the state is involved in some kind of mineral production. Petroleum and natural gas are mined the most in Kansas, followed by helium, limestone, and salt.

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Max Pixel

Kentucky

- Top industries:
- #1. Manufacturing ($37.7 billion, #22 among all states)
- #2. Real estate and rental and leasing ($21.6 billion, #30)
- #3. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($20 billion, #26)
- #4. Professional and business services ($17.9 billion, #31)
- #5. Wholesale trade ($14.2 billion, #24)
- #6. Retail trade ($12.2 billion, #27)
- #7. Finance and insurance ($12.1 billion, #29)
- #8. Transportation and warehousing ($10.4 billion, #23)
- #9. Construction ($8.7 billion, #27)
- #10. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($7.9 billion, #29)

Fourteen percent of Kentucky's large manufacturing industry comprises food and beverage products, an ever-growing sector in the state thanks to support from the surrounding agricultural industry. In fact, a third of the country's top 100 food processing companies—like Kellogg and Nestle—have facilities in the Bluegrass State. The drink industry is also incredibly successful, considering Kentucky produces 95% of the world's bourbon.

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Roy Luck // flickr

Louisiana

- Top industries:
- #1. Manufacturing ($52.2 billion, #18 among all states)
- #2. Real estate and rental and leasing ($26 billion, #26)
- #3. Professional and business services ($22.3 billion, #26)
- #4. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($22.1 billion, #25)
- #5. Retail trade ($16.1 billion, #23)
- #6. Construction ($13.7 billion, #22)
- #7. Wholesale trade ($13.4 billion, #26)
- #8. Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction ($12.2 billion, #6)
- #9. Finance and insurance ($11.9 billion, #30)
- #10. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($11.8 billion, #23)

Louisiana has one of the largest concentrations of oil refineries in the country. But while gas production has been a stable source of revenue, the state is increasingly expanding its chemical industry, which accounts for $79.7 billion in sales in Louisiana, according to a 2018 study from the Louisiana Chemical Association.

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Tony Fischer // flickr

Maine

- Top industries:
- #1. Real estate and rental and leasing ($9.3 billion, #42 among all states)
- #2. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($8.7 billion, #38)
- #3. Professional and business services ($7 billion, #43)
- #4. Manufacturing ($6.2 billion, #40)
- #5. Retail trade ($5.1 billion, #41)
- #6. Finance and insurance ($4.1 billion, #41)
- #7. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($3.6 billion, #39)
- #8. Wholesale trade ($3.5 billion, #42)
- #9. Construction ($2.4 billion, #45)
- #10. Transportation and warehousing ($1.5 billion, #45)

Because an astounding 90% of Maine is forested, foresting is one of the leading industries in the state and provides more than 33,000 jobs. However, the paper-producing industry has been shrinking with the introduction of digital media and foreign competition. Tourism has taken root in Maine, with people from around the world flocking to the picturesque Acadia National Park and Baxter State Park, where the Appalachian Trail reaches its northern limit.

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NIH // Wikimedia Commons

Maryland

- Top industries:
- #1. Real estate and rental and leasing ($68.9 billion, #13 among all states)
- #2. Professional and business services ($58.3 billion, #15)
- #3. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($37.8 billion, #17)
- #4. Manufacturing ($24.4 billion, #30)
- #5. Finance and insurance ($22.6 billion, #20)
- #6. Retail trade ($20.1 billion, #18)
- #7. Construction ($18.2 billion, #16)
- #8. Wholesale trade ($17.7 billion, #22)
- #9. Information ($17.7 billion, #14)
- #10. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($16.1 billion, #19)

Maryland's economic growth can be attributed to information technology, telecommunications, aerospace and defense, as well as biotechnology, where the state is at the center of mapping the human genome. The state is home to the National Institutes of Health, NASA, the Goddard Space Flight Center, and many Defense Department operations. Maryland's proximity to the Chesapeake Bay fuels its commercial fishing industry, which provides half of the nation's blue crab harvest.

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Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kelsey L. Adams // U.S. Navy

Massachusetts

- Top industries:
- #1. Professional and business services ($102.4 billion, #7 among all states)
- #2. Real estate and rental and leasing ($80.6 billion, #8)
- #3. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($69.7 billion, #7)
- #4. Finance and insurance ($52.8 billion, #7)
- #5. Manufacturing ($52.6 billion, #15)
- #6. Information ($31.7 billion, #8)
- #7. Wholesale trade ($27.6 billion, #13)
- #8. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($23.4 billion, #9)
- #9. Retail trade ($22.4 billion, #16)
- #10. Construction ($21.1 billion, #15)

The education and health services industries employ the most people in Massachusetts, but the state's manufacturing industry is also a significant part of its economy and produces many computer and electronic products. The technology sector has rapidly grown in recent years and continues to do so, making it among the most concentrated technology industries in the United States. Cape Cod and Martha's Vineyard also attract tourists from near and far; tourists to Massachusetts in 2018 spent a record-setting $24.2 billion.

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U.S. Department of Labor // Wikimedia Commons

Michigan

- Top industries:
- #1. Manufacturing ($99.2 billion, #7 among all states)
- #2. Professional and business services ($70.5 billion, #12)
- #3. Real estate and rental and leasing ($63.3 billion, #15)
- #4. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($49.5 billion, #10)
- #5. Wholesale trade ($34.8 billion, #10)
- #6. Retail trade ($32 billion, #10)
- #7. Finance and insurance ($27.3 billion, #15)
- #8. Construction ($21.4 billion, #11)
- #9. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($19.1 billion, #16)
- #10. Transportation and warehousing ($13.6 billion, #14)

Automobile sales in Michigan have boosted jobs, helped raise home prices, catered to tourist communities, and kept government offices open. The City of Grand Rapids, in particular, has low unemployment rates compared to the rest of the country, and Ann Arbor, which is home to the University of Michigan, has attracted consistent investment. However, the state's economy is ultimately dependent on its “big three” automakers—General Motors, Ford, and Fiat Chrysler.

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Nephron // Wikimedia Commons

Minnesota

- Top industries:
- #1. Manufacturing ($52.2 billion, #17 among all states)
- #2. Professional and business services ($48.5 billion, #17)
- #3. Real estate and rental and leasing ($40.5 billion, #18)
- #4. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($39.6 billion, #14)
- #5. Finance and insurance ($32.9 billion, #13)
- #6. Wholesale trade ($25.5 billion, #14)
- #7. Retail trade ($19.8 billion, #19)
- #8. Construction ($14.5 billion, #18)
- #9. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($12.8 billion, #22)
- #10. Information ($12.2 billion, #20)

Those employed by education and health services account for the highest percentage of Minnesota’s workforce. Manufacturing and retail trade also contribute major amounts of revenue to the state's economy. Minnesota is home to 17 Fortune 500 companies, including Target, General Mills, 3M, and United Health Group.

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Designbymickey // Pixabay

Mississippi

- Top industries:
- #1. Manufacturing ($18.8 billion, #33 among all states)
- #2. Real estate and rental and leasing ($12 billion, #39)
- #3. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($10 billion, #36)
- #4. Retail trade ($9 billion, #34)
- #5. Professional and business services ($8.3 billion, #39)
- #6. Wholesale trade ($6.2 billion, #36)
- #7. Finance and insurance ($5.6 billion, #40)
- #8. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($5.2 billion, #34)
- #9. Transportation and warehousing ($4.3 billion, #38)
- #10. Construction ($4.3 billion, #38)

Mississippi has the country's lowest cost of living as well as a strong agricultural economy valued at $7.72 billion when including government payments. The state is the world's largest producer of pond-raised catfish, the third state in cotton growth, and boasts high production rates of poultry, eggs, and dairy products.

Manufacturing was first introduced in Mississippi in 1936 with the country’s first state-sponsored economic development plan. “Balance Agriculture with Industry (BAWI)” sought to mitigate the effects of the Great Depression by incentivizing northern industries to move or expand into the south with affordable land, subsidies, and low taxes. 1965 marked the first year that industrial employment in Mississippi surpassed agricultural employment; today, manufacturing represents the top industry in the state.

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Ethan Wagner // U.S. Air Force

Missouri

- Top industries:
- #1. Professional and business services ($42.3 billion, #18 among all states)
- #2. Manufacturing ($39 billion, #20)
- #3. Real estate and rental and leasing ($35.6 billion, #24)
- #4. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($33.3 billion, #21)
- #5. Finance and insurance ($26.1 billion, #17)
- #6. Wholesale trade ($21.2 billion, #17)
- #7. Retail trade ($18.6 billion, #22)
- #8. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($13 billion, #21)
- #9. Information ($12.9 billion, #18)
- #10. Construction ($11.7 billion, #24)

The Show-Me State's main manufacturers are aerospace and transportation, followed by food products, chemicals, machinery, metals, and electrical equipment. Agriculture also remains important for the state's economy, with Missouri playing host to over 100,000 farms—second only to Texas for the most farms in the nation. The state is among the top five in the country for soybean production and is known for its exports of beef, pork, dairy products, corn, and poultry.

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Tobias Klenze // Wikimedia Commons

Montana

- Top industries:
- #1. Real estate and rental and leasing ($7.1 billion, #45 among all states)
- #2. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($5.4 billion, #46)
- #3. Professional and business services ($3.9 billion, #45)
- #4. Manufacturing ($3.3 billion, #46)
- #5. Retail trade ($3.2 billion, #45)
- #6. Construction ($2.9 billion, #42)
- #7. Wholesale trade ($2.7 billion, #46)
- #8. Finance and insurance ($2.6 billion, #47)
- #9. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($2.6 billion, #44)
- #10. Transportation and warehousing ($2.3 billion, #44)

Although livestock and agriculture have always been important sources of revenue for Montana, the state's economy has diversified. From 2000 to 2015, the industries that experienced the most growth were health care and social assistance; real estate; and food services. During the same period, the state created over 100,000 new jobs, as well. In the western part of the state, federal lands provide another boom for the economy, attracting tourists to places like Glacier National Park and the college town of Missoula.

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Richard Hurd // Flickr

Nebraska

- Top industries:
- #1. Manufacturing ($13.5 billion, #35 among all states)
- #2. Finance and insurance ($12.5 billion, #28)
- #3. Real estate and rental and leasing ($12.3 billion, #37)
- #4. Professional and business services ($11.5 billion, #35)
- #5. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($10.6 billion, #35)
- #6. Transportation and warehousing ($10.4 billion, #22)
- #7. Wholesale trade ($7.6 billion, #34)
- #8. Retail trade ($6.7 billion, #36)
- #9. Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting ($6 billion, #6)
- #10. Utilities ($3.9 billion, #27)

Nebraska depends heavily on its agricultural industry, specifically on its “golden triangle” of corn, livestock, and ethanol production. The Cornhusker State earned its name for a reason: Corn is its leading crop and the state is among the top three corn-producing states in the country. Nebraska also produces the second-highest amount of ethanol and operates 25 plants that annually yield 2 billion gallons of renewable fuel. The median household income in Nebraska is $56,927, just slightly below the national average.

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skeeze // Pixabay

Nevada

- Top industries:
- #1. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($27.9 billion, #6 among all states)
- #2. Real estate and rental and leasing ($25.4 billion, #27)
- #3. Professional and business services ($19 billion, #29)
- #4. Retail trade ($11.6 billion, #30)
- #5. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($11.3 billion, #34)
- #6. Finance and insurance ($9.2 billion, #33)
- #7. Construction ($8.6 billion, #28)
- #8. Manufacturing ($7.9 billion, #39)
- #9. Transportation and warehousing ($7.9 billion, #27)
- #10. Wholesale trade ($7 billion, #35)

As the home of Las Vegas, Nevada rakes in huge amounts of cash from its tourism and gaming industries. Almost 400,000 people are employed by the city's hotels, casinos, and other attractions, and about 2,500 jobs are added each year. Outside of Vegas, Nevada also has a thriving aerospace industry, thanks to Nellis Air Force Base in the southern region of the state. The base employs 12,000 civilian and military workers.

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Frank Schwichtenberg // Wikimedia Commons

New Hampshire

- Top industries:
- #1. Real estate and rental and leasing ($12.2 billion, #38 among all states)
- #2. Professional and business services ($11 billion, #36)
- #3. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($9.8 billion, #37)
- #4. Manufacturing ($9.7 billion, #36)
- #5. Finance and insurance ($6.8 billion, #37)
- #6. Retail trade ($5.5 billion, #40)
- #7. Wholesale trade ($5.4 billion, #37)
- #8. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($4.4 billion, #36)
- #9. Information ($3.3 billion, #36)
- #10. Construction ($2.6 billion, #44)

New Hampshire has built its success off of neighboring Massachusetts to move from historic paper and grain mills to electronic component manufacturing and other high-tech industries. Today, smart manufacturing is the most important part of the state's economy and accounts for 19% of wages paid within the state. New Hampshire is also a popular area for people looking to purchase second homes, and many of the state's vacation homes are owned by people from elsewhere who rent houses to tourists.

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Britt Reints // Wikimedia Commons

New Jersey

- Top industries:
- #1. Professional and business services ($100.9 billion, #9 among all states)
- #2. Real estate and rental and leasing ($99.9 billion, #6)
- #3. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($57.6 billion, #9)
- #4. Manufacturing ($52.3 billion, #16)
- #5. Wholesale trade ($51.8 billion, #6)
- #6. Finance and insurance ($42.2 billion, #11)
- #7. Retail trade ($35 billion, #9)
- #8. Information ($26.7 billion, #10)
- #9. Construction ($23.3 billion, #10)
- #10. Transportation and warehousing ($22.8 billion, #9)

New Jersey boasts numerous information and technology companies, as well as pharmaceutical and biotech companies, but is also home to industrial giants like Johnson & Johnson. Tourism has always been an important component of New Jersey's economy, thanks to the state's proximity to New York City, the Jersey Shore, and Atlantic City, which all attract millions of visitors each year. However, in the past decade, the tourism industry has decreased, forcing some Atlantic City casinos to close.

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Steve Burke // Wikimedia Commons

New Mexico

- Top industries:
- #1. Real estate and rental and leasing ($13.1 billion, #36 among all states)
- #2. Professional and business services ($10.5 billion, #37)
- #3. Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction ($10.5 billion, #8)
- #4. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($8.1 billion, #40)
- #5. Retail trade ($5.7 billion, #39)
- #6. Manufacturing ($4.2 billion, #44)
- #7. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($4.1 billion, #38)
- #8. Construction ($3.7 billion, #39)
- #9. Finance and insurance ($3.4 billion, #43)
- #10. Wholesale trade ($3.1 billion, #44)

Since 2007, the health care sector in New Mexico has steadily grown, adding almost 15,000 new jobs, and it is projected to grow the most out of any sector in the state. This industry is led by the New Mexico Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Lovelace Health Systems, and Presbyterian Health Systems, where practitioners earn an average salary of $73,000. Although the retail industry has shrunk, it is still among the largest operating in New Mexico and is thought to be one of five industries to significantly expand by 2020.

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George Rex // flickr

New York

- Top industries:
- #1. Finance and insurance ($309.2 billion, #1 among all states)
- #2. Real estate and rental and leasing ($238 billion, #2)
- #3. Professional and business services ($218.1 billion, #2)
- #4. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($158.7 billion, #2)
- #5. Information ($132.6 billion, #2)
- #6. Wholesale trade ($75.7 billion, #3)
- #7. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($73.9 billion, #2)
- #8. Manufacturing ($71.7 billion, #9)
- #9. Retail trade ($71.4 billion, #4)
- #10. Construction ($51.2 billion, #4)

New York is famous for its Wall Street-centric economy, and for many businesses, the state is the financial epicenter of the world. The New York Stock Exchange is the world's largest stock exchange, with a market capitalization of more than a whopping $20 trillion. And if that weren't enough, New York City is the headquarters for five of the country's 10 largest banks, including Morgan Stanley, Citigroup, and JPMorgan Chase.

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Max Pixel

North Carolina

- Top industries:
- #1. Manufacturing ($100.7 billion, #5 among all states)
- #2. Professional and business services ($68.1 billion, #13)
- #3. Real estate and rental and leasing ($64.4 billion, #14)
- #4. Finance and insurance ($49.2 billion, #9)
- #5. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($45.3 billion, #11)
- #6. Wholesale trade ($32.7 billion, #11)
- #7. Retail trade ($28.8 billion, #12)
- #8. Construction ($21.4 billion, #12)
- #9. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($21.3 billion, #12)
- #10. Information ($20 billion, #12)

North Carolina's top manufactured products are tobacco, chemicals, and computer and electronic products. However, the state also has a rich services industry, with metropolitan areas hosting a variety of finance, insurance, and real estate businesses. The North Carolina coastline also lends itself to booming commercial fishing; its most valuable products are blue crabs, clams, flounder, and shrimp.

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Tony Webster // Wikimedia Commons

North Dakota

- Top industries:
- #1. Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction ($6.7 billion, #12 among all states)
- #2. Real estate and rental and leasing ($6.5 billion, #46)
- #3. Wholesale trade ($4.6 billion, #38)
- #4. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($4.6 billion, #48)
- #5. Manufacturing ($4 billion, #45)
- #6. Professional and business services ($3.3 billion, #48)
- #7. Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting ($3.2 billion, #17)
- #8. Construction ($3.2 billion, #41)
- #9. Retail trade ($3 billion, #46)
- #10. Transportation and warehousing ($2.9 billion, #40)

Oil and gas production is an important part of North Dakota's economy, and it has significantly expanded in recent years. In 2004, oil and gas production accounted for 2% of the state's economy, but by 2014, the total was 16%. Still, the education, finance, trade, and transportation sectors employ many more people in North Dakota than the mining and logging industry. Agriculture is also a core component of the state's revenue since 90% of North Dakota's land is dedicated to farming.

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niekverlaan // Pixabay

Ohio

- Top industries:
- #1. Manufacturing ($111.5 billion, #3 among all states)
- #2. Professional and business services ($77.3 billion, #10)
- #3. Real estate and rental and leasing ($73.7 billion, #12)
- #4. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($65.2 billion, #8)
- #5. Finance and insurance ($61.9 billion, #6)
- #6. Wholesale trade ($41.7 billion, #9)
- #7. Retail trade ($38.8 billion, #7)
- #8. Construction ($25.2 billion, #7)
- #9. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($24.8 billion, #8)
- #10. Transportation and warehousing ($23.1 billion, #8)

The northwestern region of Ohio depends on its many auto parts and auto assembly plants, and the industry is only expected to grow stronger—automotive jobs are forecasted to grow 19% by 2028. Manufacturing grew 12% from 2012 to 2014, contributing $99.8 billion to Ohio's gross state product in 2014. Food production also is key to Ohio's economy, accounting for 14% of the state's jobs and contributing $105 billion to its total economic output in 2010.

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Roy Luck // flickr

Oklahoma

- Top industries:
- #1. Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction ($29.3 billion, #2 among all states)
- #2. Real estate and rental and leasing ($18.9 billion, #33)
- #3. Manufacturing ($18.5 billion, #34)
- #4. Professional and business services ($16.9 billion, #32)
- #5. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($15.4 billion, #29)
- #6. Transportation and warehousing ($13.3 billion, #16)
- #7. Retail trade ($11.1 billion, #31)
- #8. Wholesale trade ($11 billion, #30)
- #9. Finance and insurance ($7.6 billion, #36)
- #10. Construction ($7.3 billion, #32)

Tulsa may no longer be considered the oil capital of the world, but the mining industry is still the top industry in the state despite shrinking in recent years. The economy still depends on the oil and gas industry, which has just strengthened after a drop in global gas prices in 2016. The median household income in Oklahoma is well below the national average, at $49,176.

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Joi Ito // Wikimedia Commons

Oregon

- Top industries:
- #1. Real estate and rental and leasing ($38.8 billion, #22 among all states)
- #2. Manufacturing ($34.1 billion, #24)
- #3. Professional and business services ($28.6 billion, #24)
- #4. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($22.7 billion, #24)
- #5. Wholesale trade ($12.7 billion, #27)
- #6. Retail trade ($12 billion, #29)
- #7. Finance and insurance ($11.1 billion, #31)
- #8. Construction ($10.9 billion, #26)
- #9. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($10.6 billion, #26)
- #10. Information ($8.8 billion, #23)

In the past 30 years, Oregon has transitioned from a resource-based economy to a mixed manufacturing and marketing economy with an emphasis on technology. In the years before the financial crisis of 2008, Oregon experienced enormous growth in the construction and services industries but is still working to earn back the losses it experienced after that recession. Today, Oregon's top commodities include greenhouses, cattle, hay, milk, grass seed, wheat, and potatoes.

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takomabibelot // flickr

Pennsylvania

- Top industries:
- #1. Professional and business services ($101.8 billion, #8 among all states)
- #2. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($95.7 billion, #5)
- #3. Real estate and rental and leasing ($95.4 billion, #7)
- #4. Manufacturing ($91.5 billion, #8)
- #5. Finance and insurance ($52.7 billion, #8)
- #6. Information ($48.5 billion, #5)
- #7. Wholesale trade ($44.7 billion, #8)
- #8. Retail trade ($37.1 billion, #8)
- #9. Construction ($33.3 billion, #5)
- #10. Transportation and warehousing ($29.1 billion, #6)

Known for its coal and steel outputs, Pennsylvania remains one of the nation's most important industrial centers for coal, steel, and railroads. However, the state is also known as the snack food capital of the world; its sales of snacks and food total more than $5.1 billion each year. Pennsylvania is also the largest producer of canned fruit in the country, as well as vegetable specialty products, chocolate, potato chips, and pretzels.

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Will Hart // Wikimedia Commons

Rhode Island

- Top industries:
- #1. Real estate and rental and leasing ($8.7 billion, #43 among all states)
- #2. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($8 billion, #41)
- #3. Professional and business services ($7.8 billion, #42)
- #4. Finance and insurance ($5.8 billion, #39)
- #5. Manufacturing ($5.1 billion, #42)
- #6. Wholesale trade ($3.6 billion, #41)
- #7. Retail trade ($3.3 billion, #44)
- #8. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($3 billion, #42)
- #9. Construction ($2.4 billion, #46)
- #10. Information ($1.5 billion, #41)

Because of its small geographical size, Rhode Island doesn't have the same room for farming and manufacturing as other states. Instead, it leads in finance, insurance, and real estate, with Providence serving as the financial hub for all of New England. Most Rhode Island residents can attribute their income to private research facilities, law firms, computer programming companies, and repair shops.

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The ed17 // Wikimedia Commons

South Carolina

- Top industries:
- #1. Manufacturing ($38.4 billion, #21 among all states)
- #2. Real estate and rental and leasing ($29.2 billion, #25)
- #3. Professional and business services ($25.6 billion, #25)
- #4. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($17.1 billion, #28)
- #5. Retail trade ($15.4 billion, #24)
- #6. Wholesale trade ($13.4 billion, #25)
- #7. Construction ($12 billion, #23)
- #8. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($11.2 billion, #24)
- #9. Finance and insurance ($11 billion, #32)
- #10. Information ($6.6 billion, #25)

Tourism in South Carolina is booming, with visitors from across the country traveling miles to visit Charleston, Hilton Head, and Myrtle Beach, all considered some of the nation's best beach towns. Following tourism and manufacturing, other prominent industries in the Palmetto State include government and professional and business services. The state is home to the headquarters of Michelin North America, ScanSource, and Denny's.

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Hasselblad500CM // Wikimedia Commons

South Dakota

- Top industries:
- #1. Finance and insurance ($8.1 billion, #35 among all states)
- #2. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($5.4 billion, #45)
- #3. Manufacturing ($5.1 billion, #41)
- #4. Real estate and rental and leasing ($4.8 billion, #48)
- #5. Wholesale trade ($3.7 billion, #40)
- #6. Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting ($3.6 billion, #15)
- #7. Retail trade ($3.5 billion, #43)
- #8. Professional and business services ($3.1 billion, #49)
- #9. Construction ($2 billion, #48)
- #10. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($2 billion, #47)

Agriculture is one of the most important industries in South Dakota, and the state ranks among the top 10 in the country for the production of hay, sunflowers, rye, honey, soybeans, corn, wheat, and cattle. South Dakota is arguably most famous for being the home of the iconic American landmark, Mount Rushmore, and tourism is another important part of the economy, contributing about $2 billion annually. But it's the service sector, which includes retail, trade, and manufacturing jobs, that employs the most people in the state.

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Aviator31 // Wikimedia Commons

Tennessee

- Top industries:
- #1. Manufacturing ($55 billion, #14 among all states)
- #2. Professional and business services ($41.4 billion, #19)
- #3. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($40.3 billion, #13)
- #4. Real estate and rental and leasing ($40.1 billion, #19)
- #5. Wholesale trade ($24.9 billion, #15)
- #6. Retail trade ($24.3 billion, #15)
- #7. Finance and insurance ($21.5 billion, #24)
- #8. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($20.7 billion, #13)
- #9. Transportation and warehousing ($16.6 billion, #10)
- #10. Construction ($14 billion, #20)

While agriculture once dominated Tennessee's economy, the state recently has seen major expansions in the mining, construction, manufacturing, and logging industries. Tourism is another strong part of the state's economy, with people flocking to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and cities like Nashville and Memphis. Tennessee headquarters several Fortune 500 companies, including FedEx and HCA Holdings.

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Roy Luck // flickr

Texas

- Top industries:
- #1. Manufacturing ($237.7 billion, #2 among all states)
- #2. Professional and business services ($212.4 billion, #3)
- #3. Real estate and rental and leasing ($175.3 billion, #3)
- #4. Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction ($161.7 billion, #1)
- #5. Wholesale trade ($138 billion, #2)
- #6. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($123 billion, #3)
- #7. Finance and insurance ($102.7 billion, #3)
- #8. Retail trade ($99.6 billion, #2)
- #9. Construction ($92.8 billion, #2)
- #10. Transportation and warehousing ($66.3 billion, #2)

If Texas was a country, it would have the 10th-largest economy in the world based on GDP and would be ahead of Australia, Mexico, Spain, and Russia. As the top exporter in the United States, the Lone Star State in 2018 exported $315.9 billion in goods exports to the world. This economy is even further boosted by 48 Fortune 500 companies headquartered across Texas, including ExxonMobil, AT&T, Sysco, and American Airlines.

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Streamline1989 // Wikimedia Commons

Utah

- Top industries:
- #1. Real estate and rental and leasing ($24.4 billion, #28 among all states)
- #2. Professional and business services ($19.9 billion, #28)
- #3. Manufacturing ($19.6 billion, #31)
- #4. Finance and insurance ($15.5 billion, #26)
- #5. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($13.1 billion, #32)
- #6. Retail trade ($12.2 billion, #28)
- #7. Construction ($11 billion, #25)
- #8. Wholesale trade ($9.1 billion, #33)
- #9. Information ($8.5 billion, #24)
- #10. Transportation and warehousing ($6.6 billion, #31)

Goldman Sachs has named Utah the “Wall Street of the West,” and the largest job increases in the state in the coming years are projected to be in professional and business services, health care, and construction. Utah is also completing several significant construction projects that are expected to bring in even more revenue, such as the redevelopment of the Salt Lake City International Airport and an Amazon fulfillment center. People from all over also come to Utah for its ski resorts, and the state welcomed a record number of skiers in the 2018-2019 season, up 12% to 5,125,441 skier visits.

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Raffi Asdourian // flickr

Vermont

- Top industries:
- #1. Real estate and rental and leasing ($4.7 billion, #49 among all states)
- #2. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($4.6 billion, #47)
- #3. Professional and business services ($3.4 billion, #46)
- #4. Manufacturing ($3.1 billion, #47)
- #5. Retail trade ($2.5 billion, #48)
- #6. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($2.2 billion, #45)
- #7. Finance and insurance ($1.8 billion, #48)
- #8. Wholesale trade ($1.7 billion, #48)
- #9. Construction ($1.1 billion, #50)
- #10. Information ($0.9 billion, #49)

Vermont is the #1 maple syrup producer in the country and produces cheese, hay, apples, and sweet corn. The services sector is also important to the state's economy, led by community, business, and personal services.

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Robert J. Sitar/USN // Wikimedia Commons

Virginia

- Top industries:
- #1. Professional and business services ($103 billion, #6 among all states)
- #2. Real estate and rental and leasing ($75.1 billion, #10)
- #3. Manufacturing ($45.3 billion, #19)
- #4. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($39.4 billion, #15)
- #5. Finance and insurance ($27.7 billion, #14)
- #6. Retail trade ($26.6 billion, #13)
- #7. Wholesale trade ($22.6 billion, #16)
- #8. Construction ($21.3 billion, #13)
- #9. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($18 billion, #17)
- #10. Information ($17.2 billion, #15)

Virginia's economy is as diversified as its landscape, with shipbuilding dominating the coastline, federal workers populating the northern region of the state, technology companies in the suburban Washington corridor, and wineries and apple farms in the countryside. The state's unemployment rate is well below the national average and led by a civilian workforce of 4.3 million. The vineyard and winemaking industry has blossomed in recent years and is only expected to grow in the next decade.

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Robert Scoble // flickr

Washington

- Top industries:
- #1. Real estate and rental and leasing ($77.6 billion, #9 among all states)
- #2. Information ($71.6 billion, #3)
- #3. Manufacturing ($64.6 billion, #10)
- #4. Professional and business services ($59.7 billion, #14)
- #5. Retail trade ($47.2 billion, #5)
- #6. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($38.9 billion, #16)
- #7. Wholesale trade ($28.4 billion, #12)
- #8. Construction ($24.2 billion, #9)
- #9. Finance and insurance ($21.9 billion, #23)
- #10. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($21.3 billion, #11)

Washington was the country's top state for business in 2017, with the state's economy growing 3.7% the year before. The state is ripe for innovation and houses the nation's largest concentration of STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) workers and trails only California in the number of patents filed each year. Additionally, Washington has no corporate or state income tax, which helps attract a wide variety of businesses.

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Airman 1st Class Mercedee Schwartz // U.S. Air National Guard

West Virginia

- Top industries:
- #1. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($8.6 billion, #39 among all states)
- #2. Manufacturing ($8.1 billion, #38)
- #3. Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction ($7.9 billion, #10)
- #4. Real estate and rental and leasing ($7.7 billion, #44)
- #5. Professional and business services ($6.4 billion, #44)
- #6. Retail trade ($5.1 billion, #42)
- #7. Construction ($4.5 billion, #37)
- #8. Wholesale trade ($3.5 billion, #43)
- #9. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($2.9 billion, #43)
- #10. Finance and insurance ($2.7 billion, #45)

West Virginia's economy has historically so depended on mining and coal prices that low energy prices in recent years have financially hurt the state. Still, West Virginia produces most coal used in other states. The state has looked to other industries for economic growth, and in 2017, mining and logging jobs increased by 5%, accompanied by growth in the construction industry, as well.

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Royal Broil // flickr

Wisconsin

- Top industries:
- #1. Manufacturing ($63.1 billion, #12 among all states)
- #2. Real estate and rental and leasing ($39.3 billion, #21)
- #3. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($33.4 billion, #20)
- #4. Professional and business services ($33.2 billion, #22)
- #5. Finance and insurance ($26.1 billion, #16)
- #6. Wholesale trade ($20.6 billion, #18)
- #7. Retail trade ($18.7 billion, #21)
- #8. Construction ($13.9 billion, #21)
- #9. Information ($11.6 billion, #22)
- #10. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($10.7 billion, #25)

For the past century, manufacturing has dominated Wisconsin's economy. The state is the #1 paper producer in the U.S., employing over 31,000 people and producing 5.3 million tons of paper and 1.1 million tons of paperboard every year. Dairy is also an important component of the Midwestern state's economy, and it ranks first in cheese-making as well as in the production of cranberries, green beans, and corn.

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Viplav Valluri // Wikimedia Commons

Wyoming

- Top industries:
- #1. Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction ($7.5 billion, #11 among all states)
- #2. Real estate and rental and leasing ($4.3 billion, #50)
- #3. Transportation and warehousing ($3.4 billion, #39)
- #4. Manufacturing ($2.3 billion, #48)
- #5. Retail trade ($2.1 billion, #50)
- #6. Construction ($2.1 billion, #47)
- #7. Professional and business services ($2 billion, #50)
- #8. Educational services, health care, and social assistance ($1.9 billion, #50)
- #9. Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services ($1.7 billion, #49)
- #10. Wholesale trade ($1.5 billion, #49)

As the smallest state in the country in terms of population, Wyoming relies heavily on mining for its economy as well as for tourism: Its seven national parks draw 7 million people each year. The state is home to Yellowstone National Park, where visitors will find the largest hot spring in the United States and the famous geyser, Old Faithful.

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