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Do you know your state bird?

  • Do you know your state bird?

    Each state in America boasts its own culture, history, and natural beauty. To represent such diversity, people from these states have chosen their own set of symbols and customs. Specific flags, songs, mottos, flowers, and even fruits commemorate the uniqueness of individual states. Some of these symbols border on the bizarre: Texas, for example, has made the Dutch Oven its official state cooking pot. Other symbols are more universal, like state birds.

    Many people remember learning about their states' history back in elementary school. But can you still remember your state bird? To test your state knowledge, Stacker compiled a list of every official state bird in the United States. As a quick refresher, a state bird is generally indigenous to the region and frequently seen within state boundaries—but it doesn't have to be unique to that state. Case in point: Five states claimed the mockingbird, six claimed the meadowlark, and seven designated the cardinal as their official bird mascot.

    Time to test your feathery friend knowledge.

    You may also like: Do you know your state fish?

  • Alabama

    In 1927, Alabama became one of the first states to adopt an official bird—and has a compelling narrative behind the selection. Civil War soldiers from the state were nicknamed after this bird for the bright cloth on their uniforms coattails, collars, and sleeves.

  • Alabama

    Northern flicker (Yellowhammer)

  • Alaska

    This isn’t the kind of bird you’d find in the average American suburb, and it’s got a name that's equally as rare. The feathery creature is native to the arctic tundra and is the only bird in its group in which males helps out with parental care.

  • Alaska

    Willow ptarmigan (red grouse)

  • Arizona

    Much like its namesake, this bird doesn’t need to drink freestanding water—it gets most of its hydration from the food it eats. That’s why you’ll find this fearless bird hopping around the dusty desert, letting out its raw, scratchy call.

  • Arizona

    Cactus wren

  • Arkansas

    If you’ve ever woken to the sound of birds outside your window, there’s a good chance the culprit is this extremely vocal bird. There's a reason it hangs around your house, too: This species' diet is largely comprised of insects commonly found in people's backyards such as caterpillars, ants, and grasshoppers.

  • Arkansas

    Northern mockingbird

  • California

    This bird is a bit of a dandy, with a distinctive black plume on its forehead. The look befits the state famous for show business.

  • California

    California valley quail

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