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100 countries with highest GDP per capita

  • 100 countries with highest GDP per capita

    A country's gross domestic product, or GDP, is essentially a grade on its report card. It's a quick and easy way to get a feel for how that country's economy is doing—by seeing how many billions or trillions of dollars it produced in a given year. It's not a deep dive, like a parent-teacher conference, but an overall snapshot.

    Of course, GDP isn't everything. It's just one figure that doesn't take mitigating factors into account, like the amount of national debt a country entered into to produce those millions of dollars in goods or services, or the detriment to the environment that a hugely successful industry produced. Still, most experts agree that GDP is the most standardized, easily understandable way to measure the overall success or failure of economies with vastly different circumstances.

    Using data from the World Bank that was last updated in 2017, Stacker ranked 100 countries by their GDP per capita. The following countries weren't included in these rankings, as the World Bank didn't have any data available on their GDP: Eritrea, Liechtenstein, North Korea, South Sudan, Syria, and Venezuela. One nation on the following list generated a whopping $19.4 trillion in 2017—while a tiny country came out with the highest GDP per capita in the world.

    Read on to discover the 100 countries with highest GDP per capita. 

    You may also like: American cities with the highest GDP

  • #100. Iraq

    - GDP per capita: $5,018 (4.8% 2007-2017 annual growth)
    - GDP: $192.1 billion (#51 among all countries)

    After a years-long conflict with the United States, Iraq has become increasingly economically dependent on Iran, especially when it comes to energy. The threat of the Islamic State group (IS) in the region has also likely had an impact on Iraq's low GDP per capita.

  • #99. Jamaica

    - GDP per capita: $5,114 (1% 2007-2017 annual growth)
    - GDP: $14.8 billion (#118 among all countries)

    The Jamaican economy is heavily dependent on tourism and services, and an economic downturn in the 1970s contributed to the rise of violent gangs that remain in existence. Still, the overall economy did grow slightly in 2018, according to local news site Caribbean 360.

  • #98. Bosnia and Herzegovina

    - GDP per capita: $5,148 (2.1% 2007-2017 annual growth)
    - GDP: $18.1 billion (#112 among all countries)

    In Bosnia and Herzegovina, the economy largely depends on exports of metals, energy, textiles, and furniture. The decentralized government hasn't been able to reform economic policy to increase the country's GDP, and the excessive bureaucracy has hindered foreign investment.

  • #97. Namibia

    - GDP per capita: $5,231 (2.2% 2007-2017 annual growth)
    - GDP: $13.3 billion (#121 among all countries)

    The extraction and processing of minerals dominates Namibia's economy—especially gem-quality diamonds. It's also one of the world's largest producers of uranium, but doesn't grow much grain or cereals, so food shortages often become a problem in drought years.

  • #96. Suriname

    - GDP per capita: $5,317 (-0.8% 2007-2017 annual growth)
    - GDP: $3 billion (#158 among all countries)

    Mining is also the big industry in Suriname, where oil and gold make up about 85% of the country's exports. That means the economy can be very volatile when prices of these exports change, and the government has devalued the currency and raised taxes in recent years to combat the budget deficit.

  • #95. Macedonia (Former Yugoslav Republic)

    - GDP per capita: $5,415 (3% 2007-2017 annual growth)
    - GDP: $11.3 billion (#132 among all countries)

    After an extended political crisis from 2014 to 2017, Macedonia's economy has been growing in fits and starts. The government now has an action plan to accelerate the process of the country joining NATO and the European Union, which should also benefit the GDP in years to come.

  • #94. Fiji

    - GDP per capita: $5,589 (3.2% 2007-2017 annual growth)
    - GDP: $5.1 billion (#146 among all countries)

    Fiji's economy is primarily based on two things: tourism and agriculture. Local subsistence farmers grow crops such as copra, cocoa, kava, taro, pineapples, cassava, and bananas.

  • #93. Islamic Republic of Iran

    - GDP per capita: $5,594 (1.4% 2007-2017 annual growth)
    - GDP: $454 billion (#26 among all countries)

    Iran has the second highest amount of natural gas reserves and the fourth highest amount of crude oil reserves in the world, and therefore depends heavily on oil revenues. The government also has a massive presence in the country's financial and manufacturing industries.

  • #92. Belarus

    - GDP per capita: $5,728 (1.9% 2007-2017 annual growth)
    - GDP: $54.5 billion (#78 among all countries)

    Since the decline of Soviet Union, Belarus has struggled to become independent from Russian energy markets. Additionally, state-owned industries make up about 75% of the GDP.

  • #91. Paraguay

    - GDP per capita: $5,824 (6.9% 2007-2017 annual growth)
    - GDP: $39.7 billion (#88 among all countries)

    In Paraguay's cities, thousands of street vendors and microenterprises do a thriving business. In more rural areas, most people eke out a living through subsistence farming. However, in recent years, Paraguay's stock has been rising on the global level—for one thing, it's the fifth largest producer of soy in the world.

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