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States with the highest and lowest Trump approval ratings

  • States with the highest and lowest Trump approval ratings
    1/ Jamie Squire // Getty Images

    States with the highest and lowest Trump approval ratings

    In late March, special counsel Robert Mueller finally completed his investigation into the extent of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. While Mueller found Russia did interfere in the election, the report stopped short of making claims of collusion between the president or his campaign members and Russia. The report was inconclusive, however, on whether President Trump obstructed justice: "While this report does not conclude that the president committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him,” the report reads. 

    Prior to the release of Mueller's report, January was a particularly rough month for Trump’s approval rating. Polls showed the majority of Americans blaming him for the 35-day government shutdown that ended in late January (the lengthiest U.S. government shutdown in history). His overall approval rating dropped by around 3 points, taking him below his normally steady average of around 42%. In the weeks following, Trump bounced back to his pre-shutdown numbers.

    Trump’s popularity with everyday Americans has been newsworthy since he was sworn into office. He started his presidency with the lowest approval rating of an incoming president since people started collecting those numbers, and is still less popular than average. But this is a big, diverse country—and those comparisons don’t tell the whole story.

    To get a better grasp of Trump’s popularity, Stacker took a look at Morning Consult’s monthly polls tracking Trump’s approval in every state and Washington D.C. (last updated May 8, 2019) and ranked them from lowest to highest based upon approval ratings. Any states with the same approval are ranked by highest disapproval percentage. If both are the same, the tie is broken in favor of the state with a higher drop in net change percentage points. The net change of approval and disapproval percentage points between Jan. 20, 2017, and April 30, 2019, is also noted.

    Trump’s approval mostly falls along party lines: According to Gallup in mid-January, the gap of a president's approval rating between Republicans and Democrats had never been higher with a difference of 79 percentage points. Only four presidents in history have had a partisan gap of more than 60 percentage points. 

    Where someone lives has become an easy way to figure out which party they support. States in the South and Midwest with a large number of white, rural, and Christian voters support Trump, while coastal states with big cities and more people of color, millennials, and college grads tend to dislike the president. Trump’s attitude and decisions on controversial issues have led some states to join #TheResistance while others have passed laws and elected Republicans who want to further the White House’s agenda.

    Read on to see how your state feels about the president and which states in the South and Midwest will be the places to watch during Trump’s 2020 re-election campaign.

    You may also like: How state economies have changed during the Trump administration

  • #51. District of Columbia
    2/ Ted Eytan // Wikimedia Commons

    #51. District of Columbia

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 18% (-12 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 78% (+17 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -60%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: +3 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -29 points

    Donald Trump’s place of residence has also been his most vocal opposition since the beginning of his presidency. He only won 4% of the vote in the District and its disapproval rating of the president has been twice as low as any state, only decreasing since he took office. The capital even led a lawsuit against Trump alleging profits from his hotel in the city violate part of the Constitution.

  • #50. Vermont
    3/ Georgio // Wikimedia Commons

    #50. Vermont

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 30% (-11 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 67% (+22 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -37%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -4 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -35 points

    Vermont was once a Republican stronghold, but became increasingly liberal as voters from cities like Boston and New York chose to settle down in the state. Today, one of Vermont’s senators is progressive 2016 Democratic primary candidate Bernie Sanders, though the state’s popular Republican governor kept his seat in 2018. Trump’s policies, including disagreements with Canada, Vermont’s biggest international trading partner, have proved to be unpopular.

  • #49. Hawaii
    4/ Nancy // Flickr

    #49. Hawaii

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 31% (-2 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 65% (+14 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -34%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -5 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -21 points

    In Hawaii, 80% of elected officials identify as Democrats and their liberal constituents are unlikely to support the president’s conservative agenda. The Trump administration’s ongoing efforts to roll back regulations that protect the environment aren’t likely to help his numbers, as the island state is among the most vulnerable to the effects of climate change.

  • #48. Maryland
    5/ Kimberlyshorter // Wikimedia Commons

    #48. Maryland

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 33% (-3 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 63% (+12 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -30%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -3 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -17 points

    There are twice as many Democrats as there are Republicans in Maryland, leading popular Republican Gov. Larry Hogan to steer away from Trump and maintain his Democratic support. Trump’s negative view of immigration is also unhelpful to his popularity, considering one in every seven Maryland residents is foreign-born.

  • #47. California
    6/ Nick Ares // Flickr

    #47. California

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 34% (-9 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 63% (+15 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -29%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -1 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -23 points

    California and Donald Trump have had a combative relationship since he took office. In his first year alone, the state filed 44 lawsuits and motions against the administration’s policies. Trump has fought back, repeatedly criticizing the state and attempting to block some of its policies. The relationship isn’t likely to improve soon; during his inauguration, Gov. Gavin Newsom promised a "more aggressive and in-your-face” approach to dealing with the president.

  • #46. Massachusetts
    7/ Nelson48 // Wikimedia Commons

    #46. Massachusetts

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 34% (-10 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 62% (+15 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -28%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: +1 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -24 points

    Massachusetts’ Republican governor is one of the most popular in the country, but that love does not hold for President Trump, whose unpopularity drove up midterm election turnout in a liberal state where many races already had clear winners. Like other blue states, Massachusetts adopted a legal strategy to combat Trump; the attorney general has signed onto dozens of lawsuits against the administration. On Feb. 9, 2019, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren formally announced her bid for the Democratic Presidential nomination.

  • #45. Washington
    8/ Wknight94 // Wikimedia Commons

    #45. Washington

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 35% (-11 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 61% (+17 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -26%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: +1 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -27 points

    Alongside other deep blue states, Washington has taken the lead in opposing the Trump administration’s policies; issues of climate change are particularly poised to deeply affect the state’s economy in the near future. Gov. Jay Inslee made a name for himself by vocally opposing Trump on these and other issues, and hopes to run against him in the 2020 presidential election.

  • #44. New York
    9/ Eva Abreu // Flickr

    #44. New York

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 36% (-12 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 60% (+19 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -24%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -2 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -32 points

    New York City is Trump’s hometown, but that didn’t help much in the 2016 election, as 79% of residents voted against him. The rest of the state tends to lean Republican, though the president’s approval ratings have slipped even among those supporters and state Republicans have sustained electoral losses as a result.

  • #43. Connecticut
    10/ Kenneth C. Zirkel // Wikimedia Commons

    #43. Connecticut

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 37% (-10 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 60% (+18 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -23%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: no change
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -28 points

    Connecticut Republicans may have flipped a historically blue county in the 2016 presidential election, but it’s still a reliably liberal state with Democrats holding office at every state level. On the national level, Connecticut Sen. Richard Blumenthal publicly sparred with Trump several times. He’s also led 200 Democratic lawmakers in a lawsuit that claims the president violated the Constitution by not getting consent from Congress before accepting payments from foreign governments.

  • #42. Illinois
    11/ David Wilson // Flickr

    #42. Illinois

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 37% (-11 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 59% (+19 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -22%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -1 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -31 points

    Trump has commented on Chicago’s gun violence problem in speeches and tweets, but his calls for more intense policing put him at odds with city leaders advocating for reform. Trump’s trade war with China has also been contentious bringing manufacturing jobs back to some areas but cutting them in others. Voters also disapprove, as the policy leads to higher prices in stores.

  • #41. Oregon
    12/ Visitor7 // Wikimedia Commons

    #41. Oregon

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 37% (-8 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 59% (+16 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -22%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -4 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -24 points

    Oregon’s governor has made fighting Trump a policy priority, setting aside $4 million to fund lawsuits the state has signed onto in hopes of blocking some of the administration’s policies. In Congress, Oregon lawmakers seem to be more willing to work together with the White House and see room for compromise on infrastructure and transportation projects.

  • #40. Rhode Island
    13/ Kenneth C. Zirkel // Wikimedia Commons

    #40. Rhode Island

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 37% (-3 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 59% (+13 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -22%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -2 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -18 points

    Like most of its New England neighbors, Rhode Island has a reliable liberal voting record with registered Democratic voters outnumbering Republicans 3 to 1. However, they’re both dwarfed by the number of independent voters, who make up nearly half of the state’s electorate and disapprove of Trump by a large margin.

  • #39. New Hampshire
    14/ PSNH // Flickr

    #39. New Hampshire

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 39% (-6 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 58% (+14 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -19%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -6 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -20 points

    The conservative views of New Hampshire residents have historically made the state an outlier in mostly liberal New England. Recent migration from New York and Massachusetts has given liberals more of an edge and pulled down Trump’s approval rating. But many conservatives in the state are still behind him, causing tensions within the GOP in the leadup to the 2020 primary election.

  • #38. New Jersey
    15/ Doug Kerr // Wikimedia Commons

    #38. New Jersey

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 40% (-6 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 57% (+13 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -17%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -1 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -19 points

    New Jersey’s large undocumented population fuels much of the tension between the state and the federal government. Trump has stepped up federal immigration enforcement and deportations, but state law enforcement wants to make sure to keep their trust through policies that limit the cooperation between the two.

  • #37. Delaware
    16/ likeaduck // Flickr

    #37. Delaware

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 41% (-7 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 56% (+15 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -15%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -2 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -23 points

    Delaware is a blue state known for a brand of moderate politics that appeal to its large number of rural and suburban voters. Though a concentration of Trump-supporting Republicans has kept his approval somewhat higher than in neighboring states, wealthier Republicans in the north and the state’s large Democratic base swept the GOP out of elected office, partially in response to Trump’s policies.

  • #36. Maine
    17/ AlexiusHoratius // Wikimedia Commons

    #36. Maine

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 41% (-6 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 56% (+16 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -15%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -4 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -23 points

    Maine gave Trump one of four electoral votes (which the state splits between two districts) for the first time since the 1980s, but two years later Democrats captured the state House, Senate, and the governorship. This back and forth between the parties echoes urban and rural divisions voters in this more conservative New England state. Trump’s trade policy has impacted industry in the state and may put a damper among the parts of the state that still support him.

  • #35. Wisconsin
    18/ Yinan Chen // Wikimedia Commons

    #35. Wisconsin

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 42% (-6 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 55% (+14 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -13%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -1 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -19 points

    In 2016, Trump flipped Wisconsin and other states in the industrial Midwest on his promises to bring jobs and prosperity back a region full of people who felt left behind by the economic recovery. Repeating that victory in 2020 might prove difficult. Polling after the midterms has shown that the president’s support among the state’s white working-class voters might be faltering.

  • #34. Minnesota
    19/ vladeymeer // Pixabay

    #34. Minnesota

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 42% (-7 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 55% (+12 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -13%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: +1 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -16 points

    Since voting for Obama in 2008, this Rust Belt state has been trending back toward the GOP and rural voters managed to flip two Congressional seats red in an otherwise successful midterm election for state Democrats. President Trump thinks he can flip the whole state in 2020, and he may be right thanks to the support of Minnesota’s mining and manufacturing workers.

  • #33. Colorado
    20/ chachpond // Pixabay

    #33. Colorado

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 42% (-3 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 55% (+11 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -13%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: no change
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -14 points

    Once a swing state, Colorado has been turning bluer and bluer, thanks to strategic choices by state Democrats and higher-than-average numbers of college graduates and Hispanics. Voters in the state regularly elect Republicans to state office and turn down more liberal ballot initiatives, but the state’s large number of unaffiliated voters turned out in record-breaking numbers to vote for Democratic candidates in 2018, demonstrating their distaste for Trump’s rhetoric at the ballot box.

  • #32. New Mexico
    21/ Pixabay

    #32. New Mexico

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 42% (-9 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 54% (+19 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -12%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -2 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -29 points

    Once considered a swing state, New Mexico’s large Hispanic and Native American populations have cemented the state's status as a reliably blue state since the 2012 election. Races are still tight, but the midterms left New Mexico with a unified Democratic legislature. As a border state, it has been on the front lines in the fight against a border wall on the U.S.-Mexico border, one of Trump’s key immigration policies.

  • #31. Michigan
    22/ Davidshane0 // Wikimedia Commons

    #31. Michigan

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 43% (-8 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 53% (+13 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -10%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: +1 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -18 points

    Donald Trump’s narrow win in Michigan was one of the biggest shocks of the 2016 election. It was carried by his popularity from union households hoping for a revitalization of a manufacturing industry hard-hit by automation and trade agreements like NAFTA, which he promised to renegotiate. With Democrats reinvigorated by their dislike of the president and the effects of Trump's trade policy being felt across the state, chances of a repeat could be slim.

  • #30. Arizona
    23/ None // Wikimedia Commons

    #30. Arizona

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 44% (-10 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 52% (+17 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -8%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -2 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -28 points

    Republicans outnumber Democrats in Arizona, but President Trump won the state by the narrowest margin since 1996. The booming Hispanic population in the state dislikes Trump’s rhetoric around immigration. The administration’s push for a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border has also hurt his popularity in the state, as many who live there believe it's unnecessary.

  • #29. Iowa
    24/ Tim Kiser // Wikimedia Commons

    #29. Iowa

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 44% (-6 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 52% (+12 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -8%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: +2 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -17 points

    After voting for Obama twice, Iowans voted for Trump in huge numbers, winning high marks with the 40% of the state that is unaffiliated with either political party. In the two years since, many of those voters have swung toward Democrats. Iowa Republicans are also less enthusiastic; even those who do support him welcome a primary challenge.

  • #28. Pennsylvania
    25/ Inactive account – ID 12019 // Pixabay

    #28. Pennsylvania

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 45% (-4 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 52% (+13 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -7%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: no change
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -17 points

    As in other Rust Belt states, Trump’s strong Pennsylvanian support comes from rural parts of the state that have seen declines in manufacturing and coal mining. Support by union members has fallen off because of the 2017 tax reform bill and anti-union rhetoric, but Trump’s popular steel and aluminum tariffs have helped him maintain a somewhat positive image in steel country.

  • #27. Nevada
    26/ Ken Lund // Flickr

    #27. Nevada

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 45% (-6 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 51% (+12 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -6%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: +4 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -16 points

    Democrats have been increasing their voice in Nevada politics thanks to the efforts of former Sen. Harry Reid to turn out urban and Hispanic voters. Those Hispanic voters, who make up a growing chunk of the electorate, are turned off by Trump's harsh immigration policies, making it unlikely that his image in the state will improve.

  • #26. Virginia
    27/ Jim // Flickr

    #26. Virginia

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 45% (-3 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 51% (+10 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -6%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -2 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -14 points

    Virginia’s transition from a solid red state to a battleground that leans more toward Democrats has been quick and decisive; GOP candidates haven’t won a statewide race in over a decade. Despite these victories, Virginia voters are deeply divided between the Democratic leanings of the northern D.C. suburbs and metropolitan areas, and the more conservative, Trump-supporting south.

  • #25. Ohio
    28/ Tysto // Wikimedia Commons

    #25. Ohio

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 46% (-6 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 50% (+13 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -4%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: +2 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -18 points

    Ohio is similar to neighboring Pennsylvania, with many rural voters turning to Trump in the hopes that he would be able to bring back the factories that helped the region to thrive after World War II. The president has managed to hang on to a number of his supporters, but as jobs fail to come back and thousands are still being laid off, some union workers are losing faith.

  • #24. Florida
    29/ UrbanTallahassee // Wikimedia Commons

    #24. Florida

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 47% (-9 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 49% (+15 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -2%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: no change
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -24 points

    Florida remains one of Trump’s strongest swing states and one of the few where changing demographics work in his favor. White retirees generally approve of the president and are moving to the state in increasing numbers. Florida is becoming more racially diverse, but the state’s conservative-leaning Cubans, who back Trump more than other Hispanic groups, help boost his numbers.

  • #23. North Carolina
    30/ James Willamor // Flickr

    #23. North Carolina

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 47% (-5 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 49% (+14 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): -2%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -3 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -20 points

    North Carolina’s suburbs have been the site of most of the president’s lost support in this emerging battleground state. People there are frustrated with behavior they see as unpresidential. As for Trump’s policies, both lawmakers and voters in the state oppose the administration's push to change environmental regulations and allow drilling off the North Carolina coast.

  • #22. Alaska
    31/ pdx3525 // Wikimedia Commons

    #22. Alaska

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 48% (-6 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 47% (+16 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 1%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: +1 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -23 points

    America’s Final Frontier is rich with natural resources and Alaskans put their support behind Trump because of his administration’s plans to access them. The White House approved a plan to allow oil drilling in federal waters off the coast, which is popular in the state. Not all Alaskans are happy, though; Alaska’s native tribes have a great deal of influence in state politics, causing Sen. Lisa Murkowski to vote against several of Trump’s political appointments and policy proposals.

  • #21. Kansas
    32/ StarksWinter // Wikimedia Commons

    #21. Kansas

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 49% (-5 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 47% (+15 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 2%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -6 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -22 points

    Kansas made headlines during the midterms when voters elected a Democratic governor, the first time the GOP lost a statewide race in over 10 years. Still, Trump’s support in the largely conservative state remains strong, and his support could make or break the state’s 2019 Senate race.

  • #20. Georgia
    33/ None // Wikimedia Commons

    #20. Georgia

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 49% (-6 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 46% (+11 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 3%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -2 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -15 points

    Georgia seems like it should be a Trump stronghold in the staunchly Republican American deep South and many still back him wholeheartedly; for example, his endorsement pushed his preferred nominee over the finish line in the 2018 GOP primary for governor. Georgia sits in the middle of the pack for Trump approval because of "reverse migration.” Huge numbers of African-American voters moved back to the state after leaving for several decades and most disapprove of the president.

  • #19. Montana
    34/ Ron Reiring // Wikimedia Commons

    #19. Montana

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 50% (-8 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 47% (+15 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 3%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -2 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -21 points

    A generally white, rural state, Montana forms the core of Trump's base. But despite his hard campaigning, the state’s voters pride themselves on a history of voting based on issues as opposed to partisanship. The Trump administration’s push to open public lands to private development helped push the conservative state to re-elect Democrat Sen. Jon Tester in 2018 and continually sparks protests.

  • #18. Nebraska
    35/ Collinulness // Wikimrdia Commons

    #18. Nebraska

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 50% (-6 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 46% (+13 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 4%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -1 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -19 points

    President Trump’s mixed reviews in Nebraska come at the same time as his trade policies have caused mixed results in the state’s agricultural industry. Canada and Mexico are the #2 and 3 buyers of Nebraska’s agricultural products and the president's renegotiation of NAFTA helps the state’s farmers, but trade conflicts with China have impacted the state's economy and make it difficult for farmers to do business.

  • #17. Indiana
    36/ Jasssmit // Wikimedia Commons

    #17. Indiana

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 50% (-5 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 46% (+13 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 4%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: +1 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -18 points

    Donald Trump won praise early in his presidency for striking a deal that kept more than 1,000 manufacturing jobs that were being moved to Mexico at an Indiana plant instead, and his focus on revitalizing America's manufacturing sector keeps his support strong. The administration’s trade policy includes tariffs on steel and aluminum and NAFTA renegotiations that they hope will encourage voters Rust Belt states like Indiana to support Trump in 2020.

  • #16. Texas
    37/ HyunJae Park / Flickr

    #16. Texas

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 50% (-5 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 46% (+12 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 4%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: no change
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -16 points

    Flipping Texas from red to blue has long been a dream of Democrats, especially as the state’s Hispanic population continues to grow. Energized by Trump's harsh immigration rhetoric, they join young millennials moving to booming urban centers like Houston and Dallas in the state’s opposition to Trump. Though midterm results provided some hope, conservative voters still hold an edge in the state and continue to back Trump's agenda.

  • #15. Missouri
    38/ Bluelion // Wikimedia Commons

    #15. Missouri

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 50% (-3 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 46% (+12 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 4%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -3 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -15 points

    Missouri has historically been a swing state, straddling historical North-South and Midwest-Western frontier divisions. Unlike its northern neighbors, the population in the state’s rural areas continues to grow and support for Republicans, including Trump, has increased as well. However, urban residents of St. Louis and Kansas City, as well as some manufacturing workers impacted by Trump’s tariffs find themselves disappointed by his policies.

  • #14. Utah
    39/ Garrett // Flickr

    #14. Utah

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 51% (-9 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 46% (+15 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 5%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: +4 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -22 points

    President Trump has support from most Mormon voters and followers of the faith make up about 64% of Utah’s residents, but they’re starting to show less enthusiasm as his term continues. Utah has seen one of the biggest drops in presidential approval in the country, which GOP state leaders believe have less to do with his policies and more to do with his bombastic attitude.

  • #13. North Dakota
    40/ Ron Reiring // Wikimedia Commons

    #13. North Dakota

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 51% (-4 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 45% (+12 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 6%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -1 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -17 points

    North Dakota’s always been a safe state for Republicans; it’s only gone blue in five of the last 32 presidential elections. Trump is no exception, and his popularity in North Dakota played a key role in the defeat of Democratic Sen. Heidi Heitkamp in the 2018 midterms. Still, the effects of Trump’s trade policy, especially the trade war with China, impact the state’s economy and could hurt his popularity.

  • #12. Arkansas
    41/ Cliff // Wikimedia Commons

    #12. Arkansas

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 53% (-8 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 43% (+14 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 10%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: +2 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -20 points

    Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton has been posited as a possible successor to Trump’s political legacy, due to his fiery rhetoric and conservative views, and echoes the president’s. Trump’s Supreme Court appointments have also helped his popularity due to Arkansas'conservative stance on abortion. Voters on both sides of the aisle think that the new conservative majority might overturn Roe v. Wade and restrict abortion access;a popular move in a state where 60% of people believe abortion should be illegal in most cases.

  • #11. South Carolina
    42/ Akhenaton06 // Wikimedia Commons

    #11. South Carolina

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 53% (-2 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 43% (+12 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 10%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -2 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -15 points

    South Carolina’s Gov. Henry McMaster was one of Donald Trump’s earliest supporters, the first statewide-elected official to endorse him in the 2016 primary. Republicans in the state still back him and they’ve considered canceling their 2020 primary to show support and help Trump win re-election. Not everyone in the state is happy with his agenda, as seen in a Democratic upset in the midterms and the backlash against new rules that open the South Carolina coast for oil and gas drilling.

  • #10. South Dakota
    43/ Jake DeGroot // Wikimedia Commons

    #10. South Dakota

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 53% (-4 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 43% (+10 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 10%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -2 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -11 points

    As part of America’s agricultural heartland, South Dakota has the most job-related impact from the administration’s ongoing trade war with China. The Trump administration also remains popular because of its approval of the Keystone XL pipeline construction, which it has supported in spite of protests by Native American tribes and environmental groups.

  • #9. Oklahoma
    44/ Urbanative // Wikimedia Commons

    #9. Oklahoma

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 54% (-9 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 43% (+16 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 11%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: +1 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -23 points

    Oklahoma City’s Congressional district saw one of the biggest upsets of the 2018 midterms, but many just see the Democratic victory there as proof of America’s growing urban-rural divide. Oklahomans have always been a conservative bunch, and with the gains they’ve seen from the administration’s policies, their positive view of Trump may be unlikely to change.

  • #8. Kentucky
    45/ Chris Watson // Wikimedia Commons

    #8. Kentucky

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 56% (-5 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 40% (+13 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 16%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: no change
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -18 points

    In regions of Kentucky like Sandy Hook, where the collapse of the coal industry has caused significant economic upheaval, the public’s faith remains unshaken as residents in these Trump strongholds believe the president is working to bring back the jobs many Kentuckians lost over the years. The state also ranks high in its support for Trump because of his administration’s approval of Kentucky’s request to impose work requirements on those receiving Medicaid.

  • #7. Idaho
    46/ Boise Metro Chamber of Commerce // Flickr

    #7. Idaho

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 57% (-2 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 40% (+10 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 17%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: +3 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -12 points

    His "America First" rhetoric has made President Trump one of the most popular politicians in Idaho, even as the state’s booming international economy feels. The state backs Trump on most other policy issues, gun control, and opposition to the Affordable Care Act.

  • #6. Tennessee
    47/ Brent Moore // Flickr

    #6. Tennessee

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 57% (-5 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 39% (+11 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 18%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: +2 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -15 points

    Outside the urban hub of Nashville, Trump maintains the approval of many of Tennessee’s voters, despite the effect that administration’s trade policy has had on Tennessee’s farming and auto manufacturing plants; some countries also retaliated by taxing American products, including Tennessee whiskey. Residents are still confident that the White House will resolve these issues and are willing to wait it out in hopes of seeing bigger benefits down the line.

  • #5. West Virginia
    48/ Bubba73 // Wikimedia Commons

    #5. West Virginia

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 58% (-3 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 38% (+13 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 20%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -4 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -17 points

    West Virginia only started becoming a Republican state during the 2000 presidential election. Many West Virginians disliked the Democratic party’s new focus on liberal social issues and blamed the decline of the coal industry on Democratic-led environmental regulation, leading them to vote for GOP candidates for the first time in decades. Trump is known for his vocal support of coal and has proposed rolling back regulations in hopes of keeping coal plants open.

  • #4. Mississippi
    49/ NatalieMaynor // Wikimedia Commons

    #4. Mississippi

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 58% (-4 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 38% (+11 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 20%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: -1 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -14 points

    Mississippi’s large black population has yet to embrace Trump, but he remains popular among the deeply conservative white voters in a state marked by deep racial divisions. A slim majority of Mississippians live in rural areas, and they are far more likely to support Trump and other Republicans, boosting Trump’s numbers in the state.

  • #3. Louisiana
    50/ Spatms // Wikimedia Commons

    #3. Louisiana

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 58% (-2 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 38% (+10 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 20%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: +2 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -11 points

    Gov. John Bel Edwards claims that Trump calls him "his favorite Democrat.” That close relationship will be important if the Deep South’s only Democratic governor wants to win re-election in 2019. Trump won the highest vote tally for a single candidate in the state’s history and his support remains one of the steadiest in the nation.

  • #2. Alabama
    51/ Eric in SF // Wikimedia Commons

    #2. Alabama

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 61% (-1 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 35% (+9 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 26%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: no change
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -10 points

    A late-breaking scandal helped elect a Democratic senator in a 2017 special election, but it’s unclear if those results can be repeated in the ruby red deep South. Alabama is home to nearly a million Southern Baptists, part of the evangelical Christian denomination that voted for the president in huge numbers and remains strong in its support of him.

  • #1. Wyoming
    52/ Michel Rathwell // Flickr

    #1. Wyoming

    - Approval rating (April 2019): 62% (-2 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Disapproval rating (April 2019): 34% (+11 points from Jan. 2017)
    - Net approval rating (April 2019): 28%
    - Change in net approval from March 2019: +1 points
    - Change in net approval from Jan. 2017: -12 points

    Wyoming residents didn’t support Donald Trump’s preferred candidate in their most recent governor’s race, but that’s one of the only hiccups in an otherwise relatively positive relationship. The state’s oil and gas industries have seen a boost thanks to some of the administration’s rollbacks of environmental regulation. There are also hopes he may bring back some of the region’s coal mining jobs.

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