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Best animated films of all time, according to critics

  • Best animated films of all time, according to critics
    1/ Disney/Pixar

    Best animated films of all time, according to critics

    As any true movie lover can attest, now is a great time for animated fare. Indeed, what was once primarily relegated to the family genre has broadened in every conceivable scope. Hailing from various countries around the world is a full spectrum of animated styles, subjects, and motifs. They join an already legendary list of classic works from production houses like Studio Ghibli and Pixar.

    Whether tackling mature themes or aiming strictly for the family genre, the top animated films deliver far more quality than one might expect. In turn, they sit next to a range of live-action masterpieces in terms of durability and timelessness. Proving as much are the critical reviews, which can be downright gushing when the movie is well-executed.

    But which animated films do critics hail as the best of all time (as of January 2019)? Stacker went to Metacritic for the answer. To qualify for the list, each film needed at least four professional reviews. In the case of a ratings tie, the film with more reviews ranked higher on the list. Live-action films with occasional animated sequences were not considered for inclusion. Here, check out what the critics had to say.

  • #100. Peter Pan (1953)
    2/ Walt Disney Productions

    #100. Peter Pan (1953)

    Metascore: 76
    Number of critic reviews: 12
    Directors: Clyde Geronimi, Hamilton Luske, Jack Kinney, Wilfred Jackson
    Runtime: 77 min.

    On the heels of several live-action adaptations, Disney offered its own animated take on this timeless tale. The film follows Wendy and her brothers to Neverland, where they help Peter Pan and Tinkerbell do battle against Captain Hook and his crew. Disney followed "Peter Pan" up a half century later with a lackluster sequel in 2002 called “Return to Never Land.”

  • #99. Ghost in the Shell (1996)
    3/ Paramount Pictures

    #99. Ghost in the Shell (1996)

    Metascore: 76
    Number of critic reviews: 14
    Director: Mamoru Oshii
    Runtime: 83 min.

    Decades before the disappointing live-action remake from 2017, there came this highly regarded anime film out of Japan. Set in the year 2029, the story puts a cyborg policewoman and her partner on the trail of a dangerous hacker known only as the Puppet Master. Multiple sequels followed; and Netflix is reportedly continuing the story with a new animated series.

  • #98. The Secret of NIMH (1982)
    4/ Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

    #98. The Secret of NIMH (1982)

    Metascore: 76
    Number of critic reviews: 15
    Director: Don Bluth
    Runtime: 82 min.

    Former Disney animator Don Bluth forged his own path starting in the early 1980s, and this animated feature marked his directorial debut. While the style is reminiscent of Disney's, the story takes on a discernibly darker tone. In the film, a desperate mother seeks the help of super-intelligent rats to heal her ailing son.

  • #97. Is the Man Who Is Tall Happy? (2013)
    5/ IFC Films

    #97. Is the Man Who Is Tall Happy? (2013)

    Metascore: 76
    Number of critic reviews: 16
    Director: Michel Gondry
    Runtime: 88 min.

    French filmmaker Michel Gondry puts his own surrealist spin on the documentary format in this 2013 film. Employing vibrant hand-drawn animation, Gondry explores a variety of prescient topics during a series of interviews with linguist and philosopher Noam Chomsky. Interspersed throughout are live-action clips of both the filmmaker and his subject.

  • #96. Chico & Rita (2012)
    6/ Luma Films

    #96. Chico & Rita (2012)

    Metascore: 76
    Number of critic reviews: 27
    Directors: Fernando Trueba, Javier Mariscal, Tono Errando
    Runtime: 94 min.

    Inspired by classic Latin ballads and the bolero tradition, this animated musical chronicles the exploits of a pianist named Chico and singer named Rita. While pursuing a career in jazz music, the two engage in a tormented romance. The movie is replete with hard lines and vivid color—much like an adult coloring book brought to life.

  • #95. Princess Mononoke (1999)
    7/ Studio Ghibli

    #95. Princess Mononoke (1999)

    Metascore: 76
    Number of critic reviews: 29
    Director: Hayao Miyazaki
    Runtime: 134 min.

    Set during the late Muromachi period (about 1336 to 1573), "Princess Mononoke" centers on a deadly war between human clans and forest gods. The film—essentially a commentary on the damage humans have wrought on the environment—introduced the director and celebrated animator Hayao Miyazaki to global audiences.

  • #94. How to Train Your Dragon 2 (2014)
    8/ DreamWorks Animation

    #94. How to Train Your Dragon 2 (2014)

    Metascore: 76
    Number of critic reviews: 39
    Director: Dean DeBlois
    Runtime: 102 min.

    This sequel continues the adventures of a Viking named Hiccup and his dragon Toothless. After discovering an ice cave filled with dragons, Hiccup and Toothless must fend off Drago and his ruthless clan of dragon hunters. Helping them in their quest is Hiccup's long-lost mother, who turns out to be a legendary dragon rider named Valka.

  • #93. Have a Nice Day (2018)
    9/ Jiamei Spring Pictures

    #93. Have a Nice Day (2018)

    Metascore: 77
    Number of critic reviews: 16
    Director: Jian Liu
    Runtime: 77 min.

    In the spirit of early Quentin Tarantino or Guy Ritchie, this animated gangster tale blends comedy and violence to bewildering effect. At the heart of the story is a big bag of Chinese yuan, which draws all sorts of gritty personalities out of the woodwork. The story comes to life by way of Jian Liu's simple cell animation style.

  • #92. A Bug's Life (1998)
    10/ Pixar Animation

    #92. A Bug's Life (1998)

    Metascore: 77
    Number of critic reviews: 23
    Directors: Andrew Stanton, John Lasseter
    Runtime: 95 min.

    The second full-length feature from Pixar didn't put lightning in a bottle the same way “Toy Story” did, but most critics and viewers adored it anyway. In the film, a bumbling ant enlists the help of bugs when trying to protect his colony from greedy grasshoppers. Like every Pixar movie, this one features stunning computer animation.

  • #91. Happy Feet (2006)
    11/ Warner Bros.

    #91. Happy Feet (2006)

    Metascore: 77
    Number of critic reviews: 30
    Directors: George Miller, Judy Morris, Warren Coleman
    Runtime: 108 min.

    George Miller is best known as the man behind the “Mad Max” franchise, but he's also quite adept at making popular family fare. Consider this 2006 animated musical, which follows a tap-dancing Emperor penguin as he looks for love in Antarctica. The film's creators used motion-capture technology for the dancing segments, along with a myriad of CGI graphics.

  • #90. Finding Dory (2016)
    12/ Pixar Animation

    #90. Finding Dory (2016)

    Metascore: 77
    Number of critic reviews: 48
    Directors: Andrew Stanton, Angus MacLane
    Runtime: 97 min.

    Pixar's most iconic underwater characters return in this computer-animated sequel. It sends a lovably goofy fish named Dory (voiced by Ellen DeGeneres) on a search for her long-lost parents. The film raked in more than $1 billion worldwide and opened to largely favorable reviews.

  • #89. Tatsumi (2012)
    13/ Zhao Wei Films

    #89. Tatsumi (2012)

    Metascore: 78
    Number of critic reviews: 5
    Director: Eric Khoo
    Runtime: 96 min.

    The life and work of Japanese mangaka Yoshihiro Tatsumi leapt onto the big screen with this animated drama. The film follows its protagonist as he goes from a young comic book artist to the inventor of a new genre. In addition to depicting Tatsumi's personal exploits, the film includes adaptations of his short stories.

  • #88. Castle in the Sky (1989)
    14/ Studio Ghibli

    #88. Castle in the Sky (1989)

    Metascore: 78
    Number of critic reviews: 7
    Director: Hayao Miyazaki
    Runtime: 125 min.

    This heralded fantasy adventure features director Hayao Miyazaki's classic animation style at a time when he was more of a local legend than global icon. In possession of a magic crystal, a young boy and girl must outmaneuver various enemies as they search for a floating castle. This was the first full-length feature animated by Studio Ghibli, Miyazaki's studio.

  • #86. A Silent Voice (2017) (tie)
    15/ ABC Animation

    #86. A Silent Voice (2017) (tie)

    Metascore: 78
    Number of critic reviews: 10
    Director: Naoko Yamada
    Runtime: 130 min.

    Based on a manga series of the same name, this anime-style teen drama grapples with the theme of bullying. When a young deaf student gets ridiculed by one of her peers, she decides to move away. Years later, the bully who ridiculed her embarks on a quest for redemption.

  • #86. Rocks in My Pockets (2014) (tie)
    16/ Rocks In My Pockets

    #86. Rocks in My Pockets (2014) (tie)

    Metascore: 78
    Number of critic reviews: 10
    Director: Signe Baumane
    Runtime: 88 min.

    Using her distinctive animation style, Latvian artist Signe Baumane explores the relationship between genetics and madness in this singular comedy-drama. Set over the course of decades, the film depicts the personal struggles of Baumane and four other women in her family. Many of the story's events occur against a backdrop of political and economic turmoil.

  • #85. Lady and the Tramp (1955)
    17/ Walt Disney Productions

    #85. Lady and the Tramp (1955)

    Metascore: 78
    Number of critic reviews: 15
    Directors: Clyde Geronimi, Hamilton Luske, Wilfred Jackson
    Runtime: 76 min.

    Opposites attract in this 1955 classic about the budding romance between a streetwise mutt and an uptown cocker spaniel. As the two canines join lips while eating spaghetti, they share what might very well be the most famous kiss in animation history. It's all brought to life in the kind of visual style that only Disney could execute at the time.

  • #84. The Breadwinner (2017)
    18/ Aircraft Pictures

    #84. The Breadwinner (2017)

    Metascore: 78
    Number of critic reviews: 20
    Director: Nora Twomey
    Runtime: 94 min.

    Based on a bestselling children's novel, this animated drama takes place in Afghanistan in 2001. After her father is taken prisoner by the Taliban, a young girl named Parvana dresses up as a boy to buy food and support her family. During key segments that present a story within a story, the movie's harsh realist style gives way to a dreamy landscape of vivid imagery and color.

  • #83. Monsters, Inc. (2001)
    19/ Disney/Pixar

    #83. Monsters, Inc. (2001)

    Metascore: 78
    Number of critic reviews: 34
    Directors: David Silverman, Lee Unkrich, Pete Docter
    Runtime: 92 min.

    Billy Crystal and John Goodman lend their voices to two monsters named Mike and Sulley in this computer-animated smash hit. It takes place in the city of Monstropolis, where children's screams keep the power on at night. When a young girl gets loose on Mike and Sulley's watch, they must return her to the human world before anyone else finds her.

  • #82. Zootopia (2016)
    20/ Walt Disney Pictures

    #82. Zootopia (2016)

    Metascore: 78
    Number of critic reviews: 43
    Directors: Byron Howard, Jared Bush, Rich Moore|
    Runtime: 108 min.

    This $1 billion worldwide box office baby from Disney goes down in the city of Zootopia, home to animals from all walks of life. Ready to prove herself as a rookie cop is a bunny named Judy Hopps (voiced by Ginnifer Goodwin), who uncovers a vast and deadly conspiracy. With help from a con artist fox (voiced by Jason Bateman), Judy tries to crack the case before the city itself falls apart at the seams.

  • #81. Yellow Submarine (1968)
    21/ Apple Corps

    #81. Yellow Submarine (1968)

    Metascore: 79
    Number of critic reviews: 18
    Director: George Dunning
    Runtime: 90 min.

    The Beatles bandmates reportedly kept their distance from this animated adventure as it was being developed, and didn't even provide the voices for their caricature-esque counterparts. "Yellow Submarine" follows John, Paul, George, and Ringo as they journey to Pepperland to liberate the locals from the music-hating Blue Meanies. The Fab Four eventually came around when they saw the finished product, which features Beatles music and endures as a seminal work.

  • #80. Your Name (2017)
    22/ Amuse

    #80. Your Name (2017)

    Metascore: 79
    Number of critic reviews: 26
    Director: Makoto Shinkai
    Runtime: 106 min.

    Makoto Shinkai adapted his own novel when making this anime-style fantasy drama. It centers on a teenage boy in Tokyo and a teenage girl in rural Japan who possess the ability to swap bodies with one another. When the two strangers try to connect in real life, they discover it isn't just distance keeping them apart.

  • #79. Tarzan (1999)
    23/ Walt Disney Studios

    #79. Tarzan (1999)

    Metascore: 79
    Number of critic reviews: 27
    Directors: Chris Buck, Kevin Lima
    Runtime: 88 min.

    Disney was coming down off a huge peak when it delivered this 1999 animated adventure, which some say marked the end of an era. After being raised by gorillas, Tarzan must choose between the animal world and the human one. Phil Collins won an Academy Award for writing the movie's main ballad, “You'll Be in My Heart.”

  • #78. Liyana (2018)
    24/ Intaba Creative

    #78. Liyana (2018)

    Metascore: 80
    Number of critic reviews: 10
    Directors: Aaron Kopp, Amanda Kopp
    Runtime: 77 min.

    This unconventional movie serves as a testament to the power of collective imagination. "Liyana" centers on five orphans in the country formerly known as Swaziland, who collaborate on the story of a heroic Swazi girl named Liyana. Alternating between harsh reality and epic fantasy, the movie uses distinctive computer animation to depict Liyana's adventures. The film took home Best Documentary Feature at the Los Angeles Film Festival.

  • #77. Boy and the World (2015)
    25/ GKIDS / Filme de Papel

    #77. Boy and the World (2015)

    Metascore: 80
    Number of critic reviews: 18
    Director: Alê Abreu
    Runtime: 95 min.

    Awash with thrilling animation and virtually no dialogue, this Brazilian adventure follows a young boy as he searches for his father. Filmmaker Alê Abreu created the work by blending digital animation, painting, and drawing in a vivid tapestry. One critic described "Boy and the World" as a “wordless animated gem.”

  • #76. My Dog Tulip (2010)
    26/ Norman Twain Productions

    #76. My Dog Tulip (2010)

    Metascore: 80
    Number of critic reviews: 19
    Directors: Paul Fierlinger, Sandra Fierlinger
    Runtime: 83 min.

    Based on a memoir, this animated drama chronicles the 15-year friendship between British novelist J. R. Ackerley and his German shepherd. Not to be confused with a family film, “My Dog Tulip” candidly tackles a range of explicit subjects. Directors Paul and Sandra Fierlinger created the movie's distinct and somewhat vintage aesthetic by hand-drawing images on a computer.

  • #75. The Secret World of Arrietty (2012)
    27/ Studio Ghibli

    #75. The Secret World of Arrietty (2012)

    Metascore: 80
    Number of critic reviews: 28
    Director: Hiromasa Yonebayashi
    Runtime: 94 min.

    Studio Ghibli offers its own take on the classic children's book, “The Borrowers,” with this anime-style fantasy. It centers on The Clocks, a group of tiny people who secretly live inside the home of a much larger family. During its North American theatrical run, “The Secret World of Arrietty” became the fourth-highest-grossing anime film of all time in the United States.

  • #74. The Simpsons Movie (2007)
    28/ Twentieth Century Fox

    #74. The Simpsons Movie (2007)

    Metascore: 80
    Number of critic reviews: 36
    Director: David Silverman
    Runtime: 87 min.

    Bringing the world's foremost animated family onto the big screen, this adventure comedy finds the Simpsons fleeing Springfield after Homer causes an environmental catastrophe. The animation style is consistent with the TV series, though many of the sequences and set pieces are far more elaborate. The movie's creators spent years in development and went through a reported 166 drafts of the script before landing on the final product.

  • #73. Coraline (2009)
    29/ Focus Features

    #73. Coraline (2009)

    Metascore: 80
    Number of critic reviews: 38
    Director: Henry Selick
    Runtime: 100 min.

    It took the stop-motion animation wizards at Laika Studios more than four years to create this fantasy film, with 500 people involved in the process. "Coraline" is based on a book by Neil Gaiman and follows its adventurous title character into a secret parallel world. “The results are nothing short of magical,” according to Tasha Robinson of The A.V. Club,

  • #72. Howl's Moving Castle (2005)
    30/ Studio Ghibli

    #72. Howl's Moving Castle (2005)

    Metascore: 80
    Number of critic reviews: 40
    Director: Hayao Miyazaki
    Runtime: 119 min.

    Hayao Miyazaki was on top of the world when he unleashed this acclaimed family adventure, in which a young woman falls victim to a witch's curse. The only person capable of reversing the spell is a magician named Howl, who inhabits his own moving castle. As with all of Miyazaki's films, this one features his distinctive hand-drawn anime style.

  • #71. Incredibles 2 (2018)
    31/ Walt Disney Pictures

    #71. Incredibles 2 (2018)

    Metascore: 80
    Number of critic reviews: 51
    Director: Brad Bird
    Runtime: 118 min.

    It might have been released 14 years after the original, but this long-awaited sequel picks up right where the first one left off. The story follows Mrs. Incredible as she tries to stop a villain known only as The Screen Slaver. Back at home, Mr. Incredible discovers that baby Jack-Jack might very well be the family's most powerful member.

  • #69. Wrinkles (2014) (tie)
    32/ Cromosoma

    #69. Wrinkles (2014) (tie)

    Metascore: 81
    Number of critic reviews: 12
    Director: Ignacio Ferreras
    Runtime: 89 min.

    This 2D animated drama based on a Spanish comic strip takes place at a senior care facility. As he grapples with the early stages of Alzheimer's, a resident named Emilio forms a friendship with another resident named Miguel. Miguel helps Emilio avoid being sent to the facility's dreaded top floor, alternately known as the “assisted” floor, by resorting to a range of crafty schemes.

  • #69. Consuming Spirits (2012) (tie)
    33/ YouTube

    #69. Consuming Spirits (2012) (tie)

    Metascore: 81
    Number of critic reviews: 12
    Director: Chris Sullivan
    Runtime: 136 min.

    Filmmaker Chris Sullivan employs an array of jarring animation styles to explore the lives of three small-town characters in this idiosyncratic comedy-drama. The film—which shifts between time periods and tackles themes of poverty, madness, despair, and alcoholism—frequently culls from Sullivan's personal experiences. In his review for Slate Magazine, critic Joseph Jon Lanthier called it “one of the most uniquely humanistic animated features of all time.”

  • #68. Mirai (2018)
    34/ Early Bird Pictures

    #68. Mirai (2018)

    Metascore: 81
    Number of critic reviews: 18
    Director: Mamoru Hosoda
    Runtime: 98 min.

    Mamoru Hosoda's acclaimed fantasy chronicles the adventures of an erratic 4-year-old boy named Kun, who grows jealous with the arrival of his baby sister. Upon discovering a secret garden in his own backyard, Kun travels through time to meet with various ancestors. This was the first non-Studio Ghibli anime film to be nominated for Best Animated Feature at the Academy Awards.

  • #67. The Secret of Kells (2010)
    35/ Les Armateurs

    #67. The Secret of Kells (2010)

    Metascore: 81
    Number of critic reviews: 20
    Directors: Nora Twomey, Tomm Moore
    Runtime: 75 min.

    Mixing history and fantasy to brilliant effect, this animated adventure takes place in medieval Europe. To help a master illuminator complete a magical book, a young boy must overcome his darkest fears by venturing deep into the forest. The film's bold aesthetic draws from a well of influences, including medieval art, and both Japanese and American animation styles.

  • #66. Paprika (2006)
    36/ Madhouse

    #66. Paprika (2006)

    Metascore: 81
    Number of critic reviews: 26
    Director: Satoshi Kon
    Runtime: 90 min.

    This stunning Japanese thriller based on a novel of the same name centers on a futuristic machine that gives therapists the ability to enter their patients' dreams. When the machine ends up in the wrong hands, the real world and dream world begin to merge. This mind-bender of a film serves as a clear predecessor to Christopher Nolan's “Inception.”

  • #65. Shaun the Sheep Movie (2015)
    37/ Lionsgate

    #65. Shaun the Sheep Movie (2015)

    Metascore: 81
    Number of critic reviews: 30
    Directors: Mark Burton, Richard Starzak
    Runtime: 85 min.

    The British series “Shaun the Sheep” spun off from the popular “Wallace & Gromit” franchise back in 2007. Years later, the stop-motion animated sheep received a movie all his own. It follows Shaun from the rural countryside to the big city, where all sorts of misadventures await.

  • #64. Moana (2016)
    38/ Disney

    #64. Moana (2016)

    Metascore: 81
    Number of critic reviews: 44
    Directors: Chris Williams, Don Hall, John Musker, Ron Clements
    Runtime: 107 min.

    Inspired by Polynesian origin myths, this 3D computer-animated Disney movie finds a small island community dealing with an ancient curse. The community's only hope is a brave young explorer named Moana, who embarks on a treacherous voyage across the sea. Rumor has it that Lin-Manuel Miranda, who wrote the score for "Moana," is working on a follow-up.

  • #63. Coco (2017)
    39/ Disney/Pixar

    #63. Coco (2017)

    Metascore: 81
    Number of critic reviews: 48
    Directors: Adrian Molina, Lee Unkrich
    Runtime: 105 min.

    Pixar's most recent release expands upon the traditional musical by making music itself the most persistent motif. Set in Mexico, “Coco” follows an aspiring young musician into the Land of the Dead. There, he learns the real story behind his own family history.

  • #62. Window Horses (2017)
    40/ Ann Marie Fleming

    #62. Window Horses (2017)

    Metascore: 82
    Number of critic reviews: 6
    Director: Ann Marie Fleming
    Runtime: 85 min.

    Asian-Canadian filmmaker Ann Marie Fleming raised more than $80,000 on Indiegogo to finance this Oscar-nominated drama. Juxtaposing a bevy of hand-drawn styles, the movie follows a young poet to Iran to perform at a poetry festival. By finding common ground between multiple cultures, Fleming provides a poignant counterpunch to modern xenophobia.

  • #61. The Girl Without Hands (2017)
    41/ Les Films Sauvages

    #61. The Girl Without Hands (2017)

    Metascore: 82
    Number of critic reviews: 8
    Director: Sébastien Laudenbach
    Runtime: 76 min.

    French filmmaker Sébastien Laudenbach adapts a Grimm Brothers fairy tale of the same name to tell the story of a miller's daughter. Sold to the devil by her father, the daughter loses her hands while escaping from hell. Further distinguishing the dark tale is Laudenbach's kinetic, watercolor-style animation.

  • #58. The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993) (tie)
    42/ Disney Enterprises

    #58. The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993) (tie)

    Metascore: 82
    Number of critic reviews: 31
    Director: Henry Selick
    Runtime: 76 min.

    Tim Burton developed the story and characters for this musical masterpiece, which endures as one of the greatest achievements in the history of stop-motion animation. It sees chaos coming to Halloween Town after local leader Jack Skellington tries to invoke a little Christmas spirit. Skellington's decision to kidnap Santa Claus certainly doesn't help.

  • #58. The Illusionist (2010) (tie)
    43/ Pathé

    #58. The Illusionist (2010) (tie)

    Metascore: 82
    Number of critic reviews: 31
    Director: Sylvain Chomet
    Runtime: 80 min.

    Filmmaker Sylvain Chomet adapted an unproduced script by 20th century director Jacques Tati to offer an animated take on what was originally a live-action premise. Set in 1959, the acclaimed drama follows a Parisian illusionist as he falls out of favor during rock and roll's meteoric ascent. That sends him on a journey to Scotland, where his life is forever changed by a young woman.

  • #58. Waking Life (2001) (tie)
    44/ Fox Searchlight

    #58. Waking Life (2001) (tie)

    Metascore: 82
    Number of critic reviews: 31
    Director: Richard Linklater
    Runtime: 99 min.

    Richard Linklater is best known as the man behind movies like “Boyhood” and “Dazed and Confused,” but he also churned out this surrealist meditation on the meaning of life. It follows a young man through a dreamy landscape as he talks about the universe with a variety of people. The film's animated palette comes by way of special computer software that allows artists to sketch over video images in a fashion similar to rotoscoping (a technique in which actors are filmed and then later traced over by animators).

  • #57. Isle of Dogs (2018)
    45/ American Empirical Pictures

    #57. Isle of Dogs (2018)

    Metascore: 82
    Number of critic reviews: 55
    Director: Wes Anderson
    Runtime: 101 min.

    Wes Anderson's second stop-motion animated film takes place in Japan, where all dogs have been exiled on the heels of a dog flu outbreak. Unwilling to forever part with his beloved pet Spots, a young boy named Atari sets out to get the dog back. Numerous celebrities lent their voices, including Bill Murray, Frances McDormand, Greta Gerwig, Edward Norton, Bryan Cranston, Scarlett Johansson, and Yoko Ono.

  • #56. 101 Dalmatians (1961)
    46/ Walt Disney Productions

    #56. 101 Dalmatians (1961)

    Metascore: 83
    Number of critic reviews: 10
    Directors: Clyde Geronimi, Hamilton Luske, Wolfgang Reitherman
    Runtime: 79 min.

    Long before Disney's 1996 live-action version, there was this original animated classic. It centers on a litter of Dalmatian puppies abducted by a villainess named Cruella de Vil. The movie's rugged and atypical animation style comes as a result of xerography, a dry photocopying process that helped Disney cut costs.

  • #55. Porco Rosso (1992)
    47/ JAL

    #55. Porco Rosso (1992)

    Metascore: 83
    Number of critic reviews: 11
    Director: Hayao Miyazaki
    Runtime: 94 min.

    Hayao Miyazaki adapted his own three-part watercolor manga series for this adventure comedy, which takes place in 1930s Italy. "Porco Rosso" tells the story of an ex-fighter pilot turned high-flying bounty hunter, who makes a living by saving kidnap victims from ruthless “air pirates.” When a strange curse turns him into an anthropomorphic pig, the pilot takes on the name of Porco Rosso (Italian for “Red Pig”).

  • #54. The Lion King (1994)
    48/ Disney Enterprises

    #54. The Lion King (1994)

    Metascore: 83
    Number of critic reviews: 14
    Directors: Rob Minkoff, Roger Allers
    Runtime: 89 min.

    Disney was on a veritable hot streak when it released this animated classic, in which a lion cub named Simba is tricked into thinking he killed his own father. After running away from home, Simba returns to reclaim his birthright. Composer Hans Zimmer won an Academy Award for Best Score while the film likewise features a number of iconic songs.

  • #52. Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988) (tie)
    49/ Walt Disney Studios

    #52. Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988) (tie)

    Metascore: 83
    Number of critic reviews: 15
    Director: Robert Zemeckis
    Runtime: 104 min.

    Set in a world where humans and cartoons co-exist, this 1988 blockbuster asks who framed Hollywood ‘toon star Roger Rabbit for murder. Desperate to clear his name, Roger turns to a cartoon-hating detective (Bob Hoskins) for help. With its budget of $70 million (about $150 million in today's dollars), this was the most expensive movie ever made at the time of its release.

  • #52. Kiki's Delivery Service (1989) (tie)
    50/ Studio Ghibli

    #52. Kiki's Delivery Service (1989) (tie)

    Metascore: 83
    Number of critic reviews: 15
    Director: Hayao Miyazaki
    Runtime: 103 min.

    Critical darling Hayao Miyazaki makes the list yet again with this coming-of-age fantasy film. It follows a young witch named Kiki as she struggles to fit in with a small seaside community. Gifted with the ability to fly, Kiki earns a living by launching her own air delivery service.

  • #51. Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009)
    51/ Twentieth Century Fox

    #51. Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009)

    Metascore: 83
    Number of critic reviews: 34
    Director: Wes Anderson
    Runtime: 87 min.

    Filmmaker Wes Anderson brings a Roald Dahl tale to life by way of singular stop-motion animation. "Fantastic Mr. Fox" pits an anthropomorphic fox and his animal community against the wrath of a vengeful farmer. Anderson's team constructed numerous puppets while paying meticulous attention to detail, spending $83,000 on the first Mr. Fox puppet alone.

  • #50. Corpse Bride (2005)
    52/ Warner Bros.

    #50. Corpse Bride (2005)

    Metascore: 83
    Number of critic reviews: 35
    Directors: Mike Johnson, Tim Burton
    Runtime: 77 min.

    A sheepish groom accidentally marries a deceased woman in this stop-motion animated fantasy drama. Tim Burton and his animators used precision-crafted clockwork heads for the puppets, allowing for greater degrees of facial subtlety. One animator reported having nightmares about adjusting his own face in the very same way.

  • #49. The Wind Rises (2013)
    53/ Studio Ghibli

    #49. The Wind Rises (2013)

    Metascore: 83
    Number of critic reviews: 41
    Director: Hayao Miyazaki
    Runtime: 126 min.

    Hayao Miyazaki's most mature effort to date once again finds him revisiting aviation history, minus the fantasy element. Inspired by the true story of Jirô Horikoshi, the movie chronicles Jirô's life as the innovative designer behind the Mitsubishi A6M Zero fighter airplane. Some critics took the movie to task over its perceived glamorization of Japan's imperialist past, but Miyazaki would attest it was Horikoshi's “extraordinary genius” that drew him into the story.

  • #48. The LEGO Movie (2014)
    54/ Warner Bros.

    #48. The LEGO Movie (2014)

    Metascore: 83
    Number of critic reviews: 43
    Directors: Christopher Miller, Phil Lord
    Runtime: 100 min.

    "The LEGO Movie" brims with hilarious meta-jokes, celebrity voices, sophisticated themes, and at least one unforgettable song. The adventure-comedy centers on an average LEGO construction worker named Emmet (voiced by Chris Pratt), who sparks a revolution against an evil capitalist overlord known as Lord Business (voiced by Will Ferrell). The movie's visual style combined CGI with some stop-motion animation and a touch of live action.

  • #47. Shrek (2001)
    55/ DreamWorks Animation

    #47. Shrek (2001)

    Metascore: 84
    Number of critic reviews: 34
    Directors: Andrew Adamson, Vicky Jenson
    Runtime: 90 min.

    Loosely based on a picture book, this wildly successful CGI comedy takes place in a world inhabited by classic fairy tale characters. In order to reclaim his swampland, an ogre named Shrek (voiced by Mike Myers) and his wisecracking donkey (voiced by Eddie Murphy) must rescue Princess Fiona (voiced by Cameron Diaz) from the clutches of an evil dragon. Shrek's character was so iconic that he got a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

  • #46. Kubo and the Two Strings (2016)
    56/ Focus Features

    #46. Kubo and the Two Strings (2016)

    Metascore: 84
    Number of critic reviews: 38
    Director: Travis Knight
    Runtime: 101 min.

    "Kubo and the Two Strings" represents the directorial debut of Laika Studios president and CEO Travis Knight. The stop-motion animated fantasy takes place in feudal Japan where, to escape the wrath of vengeful spirits, a young boy must track down his deceased father's Samurai armor. As is typical with Laika Studios projects, "Kubo and the Two Strings" involved building numerous set pieces and puppets from scratch.

  • #45. The Three Caballeros (1945)
    57/ Walt Disney Pictures

    #45. The Three Caballeros (1945)

    Metascore: 85
    Number of critic reviews: 6
    Director: Bill Roberts, Clyde Geronimi, Harold Young, Jack Kinney, Norman Ferguson
    Runtime: 71 min.

    Long before “Who Framed Roger Rabbit” there came this overlooked family comedy from 1945, which likewise blended live-action and animation. Set during Donald Duck's birthday, "The Three Caballeros" sends the beloved Disney character on three Latin-themed adventures. The film was preceded by a much shorter live-action animation hybrid called “Saludos Amigos.”

  • #44. Sleeping Beauty (1959)
    58/ Walt Disney Studios

    #44. Sleeping Beauty (1959)

    Metascore: 85
    Number of critic reviews: 12
    Director: Clyde Geronimi
    Runtime: 75 min.

    Disney's 16th animated feature marked the end of an era: The studio didn't adapt another fairy tale for several decades. In "Sleeping Beauty," Princess Aurora succumbs to a vicious spell that can only be reversed by the kiss of her true love. The film was a financial disappointment upon its release, but today is regarded as a bona fide classic.

  • #43. Cinderella (1950)
    59/ Walt Disney Productions

    #43. Cinderella (1950)

    Metascore: 85
    Number of critic reviews: 15
    Directors: Clyde Geronimi, Hamilton Luske, Wilfred Jackson
    Runtime: 74 min.

    This iconic family film singlehandedly saved Walt Disney Studios from the brink of collapse. It's no wonder Cinderella's castle takes center stage in the Disney universe, or that Walt Disney himself said his favorite moment in animation history came when Cinderella got her gown. In the story, the downtrodden daughter of a wicked stepmother sneaks her way to the ball and fulfills her destiny.

  • #42. April and the Extraordinary World (2016)
    60/ Je Suis Bien Content

    #42. April and the Extraordinary World (2016)

    Metascore: 85
    Number of critic reviews: 17
    Director: Christian Desmares, Franck Ekinci
    Runtime: 105 min.

    This French adventure offers an alternative version of history as it imagines a world in which some of the 20th century's greatest discoveries never took place. The movie follows a young girl named Avril (or April in English) as she searches for her missing scientist parents in 1941. In his review for the Austin Chronicle, film critic Marc Savlov described the movie as “amazingly original and jaw-droppingly entertaining.”

  • #41. Song of the Sea (2014)
    61/ GKIDS

    #41. Song of the Sea (2014)

    Metascore: 85
    Number of critic reviews: 24
    Director: Tomm Moore
    Runtime: 93 min.

    This animated fantasy from Europe centers on a pair of Irish siblings named Ben and Saoirse. When Ben discovers that Saoirse is actually a shape-shifting creature known as a selkie, the two embark on a thrilling adventure across the sea. As with his previous work, filmmaker Tomm Moore employs exquisite hand-drawn animation.

  • #40. My Life as a Zucchini (2017)
    62/ Rita Productions

    #40. My Life as a Zucchini (2017)

    Metascore: 85
    Number of critic reviews: 28
    Director: Claude Barras
    Runtime: 70 min.

    This Swiss-French comedy-drama follows a young boy to a packed foster home where he discovers the true meaning of love and friendship. To create the work, director Claude Barras called upon a traveling network of stop-motion animators. "My Life as a Zucchini" was nominated for Best Animated Feature Film at the Academy Awards, and even shortlisted as Switzerland's official entry for Best Foreign Language Film.

  • #39. The Iron Giant (1999)
    63/ Warner Bros.

    #39. The Iron Giant (1999)

    Metascore: 85
    Number of critic reviews: 29
    Director: Brad Bird
    Runtime: 86 min.

    What was originally an overlooked animated adventure has become a modern-day cult classic. "The Iron Giant" chronicles the adventures of a young boy and his giant alien robot friend as they flee from a paranoid government agent. Legendary storyteller Brad Bird was inspired to make the film after asking himself the question, “What if a gun had a soul?”

  • #38. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind (1985)
    64/ Disney

    #38. Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind (1985)

    Metascore: 86
    Number of critic reviews: 7
    Director: Hayao Miyazaki
    Runtime: 117 min.

    One of Hayao Miyazaki's earliest feature-length films is also one of his best. It tells the story of a peace-loving warrior named Princess Nausicaä who attempts to prevent two battling nations from destroying the planet. "Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind" takes place in an apocalyptic wasteland and presents viewers with important messages about environmentalism.

  • #37. My Neighbor Totoro (1988)
    65/ Studio Ghibli

    #37. My Neighbor Totoro (1988)

    Metascore: 86
    Number of critic reviews: 15
    Director: Hayao Miyazaki
    Runtime: 86 min.

    Two young girls forge a friendship with a forest spirit in this animated fantasy from Hayao Miyazaki. The renowned director incorporated autobiographical elements into the story, including his experiences dealing with a sick mother when he was young. Writing for Empire Magazine, critic Dan Jolin called the film “an otherworldly tale of childhood and a definitive work of imagination.”

  • #36. Ernest & Célestine (2014)
    66/ GKids

    #36. Ernest & Célestine (2014)

    Metascore: 86
    Number of critic reviews: 22
    Directors: Benjamin Renner, Stéphane Aubier, Vincent Patar
    Runtime: 80 min.

    Based on a series of children's books, this Franco-Belgian fantasy accordingly features storybook-like animation. "Ernest & Célestine" takes place in a world where bears live in cities and rodents dwell underground and follows the unlikely friendship between a street-performing bear and a young mouse. Facing prejudice on all sides, the two friends boldly challenge the misguided principles of their respective societies.

  • #35. Aladdin (1992)
    67/ Walt Disney Pictures

    #35. Aladdin (1992)

    Metascore: 86
    Number of critic reviews: 25
    Directors: John Musker, Ron Clements
    Runtime: 90 min.

    With a live-action remake in the works, now is the perfect time to revisit this animated classic from 1992. "Aladdin" follows a scrappy street urchin by the same name who chances upon a genie's lamp and uses one of his wishes to become a powerful prince. Comedian Robin Williams provided the voice for the genie, ad-libbing so many lines that it cost the movie an Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay.

  • #34. Ponyo (2009)
    68/ Studio Ghibli

    #34. Ponyo (2009)

    Metascore: 86
    Number of critic reviews: 29
    Director: Hayao Miyazaki
    Runtime: 101 min.

    A young goldfish named Ponyo lies at the heart of Hayao Miyazaki's animated adventure. After falling in love with a five-year-old boy, Ponyo uses her father's magic to take the form of a human girl. As with some of Miyazaki's previous work, the story grapples with themes of environmental destruction and the fragility of the natural world.

  • #33. The Red Turtle (2017)
    69/ Studio Ghibli

    #33. The Red Turtle (2017)

    Metascore: 86
    Number of critic reviews: 32
    Director: Michael Dudok de Wit
    Runtime: 80 min.

    Studio Ghibli co-produced this dialogue-free fantasy film about a shipwrecked man and his encounters with a mysterious red turtle. Dutch animator Michael Dudok de Wit directed and co-wrote the work, incorporating hand-drawn and digital 2D animation. "The Red Turtle" won Un Certain Regard—Special Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival.

  • #32. The King and the Mockingbird (2014)
    70/ Les Films Paul Grimault

    #32. The King and the Mockingbird (2014)

    Metascore: 87
    Number of critic reviews: 14
    Director: Paul Grimault
    Runtime: 83 min.

    French animator Paul Grimault and screenwriter Jacques Prévert began working on this fairy tale adaptation back in 1948. When an incomplete version was released without Grimault's permission, the artist spent decades raising enough money to buy back the rights. He was eventually able to complete the work about a chimney sweep and shepherdess who flee from a tyrannical king.

  • #31. Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit (2005)
    71/ Aardman Animations

    #31. Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit (2005)

    Metascore: 87
    Number of critic reviews: 38
    Directors: Nick Park, Steve Box
    Runtime: 85 min.

    A British stop-motion claymation franchise got the feature-length treatment with the release of this critical darling. In "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit," villagers count down the days to an annual vegetable-growing competition as a giant mutated rabbit begins destroying all the local gardens. It sounds like a job for "Anti-Pesto,” the pest-control outfit run by Wallace and his loyal dog, Gromit.

  • #30. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (2018)
    72/ Sony Pictures Animation

    #30. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (2018)

    Metascore: 87
    Number of critic reviews: 50
    Directors: Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey, Rodney Rothman
    Runtime: 117 min.

    Critics and audiences alike went hog wild for the latest “Spider-Man” movie, in which a number of people wear the superhero's mask. It follows Brooklyn teenager Miles Morales into a multiverse, where he teams up with five counterparts against a dangerous threat. The film's creators borrowed ideas from hand-drawn techniques and broke with numerous conventions when developing its seminal computer-animation style.

  • #29. Ruben Brandt, Collector (2018)
    73/ Ruben Brandt Ltd.

    #29. Ruben Brandt, Collector (2018)

    Metascore: 88
    Number of critic reviews: 4
    Director: Milorad Krstic
    Runtime: 96 min.

    Aimed squarely at adults, this Hungarian crime drama features psychotherapist Ruben Brandt and his surrealist nightmares. Each nightmare is inspired by a specific work of art, and Brandt is convinced that the torment only will cease once the artwork is in his possession. As “The Collector” and his gang steal these famous works of art from around the world, a team of detectives works to crack the case.

  • #28. The Little Mermaid (1989)
    74/ Walt Disney Studios

    #28. The Little Mermaid (1989)

    Metascore: 88
    Number of critic reviews: 24
    Directors: John Musker, Ron Clements
    Runtime: 83 min.

    In "The Little Mermaid," a young mermaid named Ariel gives up her voice in order to take human form. Should Ariel fail to win the love of a human prince, her soul will belong to the evil sea witch Ursula forever. The film marks the last time Disney used cels and Xeroxing.

  • #26. Chicken Run (2000) (tie)
    75/ Aardman Animations

    #26. Chicken Run (2000) (tie)

    Metascore: 88
    Number of critic reviews: 34
    Directors: Nick Park, Peter Lord
    Runtime: 84 min.

    The first feature-length film from Aardman Animations takes place on a Yorkshire poultry farm styled after a World War II POW camp. Determined to avoid their inevitable fate, Rocky the rooster and Ginger the chicken hatch an epic escape plan. Creating the stop-motion animation was a painstaking process: The filmmakers turned in about three seconds of footage per day.

  • #26. Toy Story 2 (1999) (tie)
    76/ Disney/Pixar

    #26. Toy Story 2 (1999) (tie)

    Metascore: 88
    Number of critic reviews: 34
    Directors: Ash Brannon, John Lasseter, Lee Unkrich
    Runtime: 92 min.

    Woody, Buzz Lightyear, and the rest of the gang are back in this beloved sequel taking place while Andy is away at summer camp. When Woody gets stolen by a crazed collector, the remaining toys set about rescuing their friend. It was another 11 years before the saga continued with a third installment.

  • #25. Up (2009)
    77/ Disney/Pixar

    #25. Up (2009)

    Metascore: 88
    Number of critic reviews: 37
    Directors: Bob Peterson, Pete Docter
    Runtime: 96 min.

    After opening with one of the most unforgettable sequences in animated history, this Pixar film embarks on a quest of legendary proportion. It follows an old man (voiced by Ed Asner) as he equips his house with tons of balloons and then takes to the sky, bringing a young stowaway along for the ride. Film critic Richard Corliss called it the “studio's most deeply emotional and affecting work.”

  • #24. Paddington 2 (2018)
    78/ StudioCanal

    #24. Paddington 2 (2018)

    Metascore: 88
    Number of critic reviews: 38
    Director: Paul King
    Runtime: 103 min.

    A computer-animated bear takes center stage in this otherwise live-action sequel. Now settled in with the Brown family, Paddington gets a series of odd jobs in order to buy Aunt Lucy a 100th birthday present. When the present is stolen, Paddington and the Browns are on the case.

  • #23. Anomalisa (2015)
    79/ Paramount Pictures

    #23. Anomalisa (2015)

    Metascore: 88
    Number of critic reviews: 46
    Directors: Charlie Kaufman, Duke Johnson
    Runtime: 90 min.

    Auteur Charlie Kaufman takes his heady preoccupations into stop-motion animation territory with this effort. When a depressed man meets a stranger during a business trip, his entire outlook on life changes for the better. Initial funding for "Anomalisa" came from a successful Kickstarter campaign.

  • #22. The Tale of The Princess Kaguya (2014)
    80/ Studio Ghibli

    #22. The Tale of The Princess Kaguya (2014)

    Metascore: 89
    Number of critic reviews: 28
    Director: Isao Takahata
    Runtime: 137 min.

    Studio Ghibli co-founder Isao Takahata adapted a 10th-century folktale for this animated adventure, in which a tiny princess is discovered inside a bamboo stalk. After growing into a beautiful young woman, the princess is courted by a range of male suitors. Studio Ghibli renders a gorgeous style reminiscent of Japanese paintings, once again pushing the boundaries of anime.

  • #21. It's Such a Beautiful Day (2012)
    81/ Bitter Films

    #21. It's Such a Beautiful Day (2012)

    Metascore: 90
    Number of critic reviews: 7
    Director: Don Hertzfeldt
    Runtime: 62 min.

    This morbid masterpiece converges three short films into a unified whole as "It's Such a Beautiful Day" confronts a stick figure named Bill with a psychological breakdown. Creator Don Hertzfeldt employs a bevy of experimental visuals as the narrative segues between reality, memory, and hallucination. What's ultimately revealed is a mind-bending meditation on humanity's biggest and most persistent fixations.

  • #20. Only Yesterday (1991)
    82/ Studio Ghibli

    #20. Only Yesterday (1991)

    Metascore: 90
    Number of critic reviews: 19
    Director: Isao Takahata
    Runtime: 118 min.

    Based on a manga of the same name, this anime-style drama takes place in 1982. It follows an office worker to the countryside, where she reflects upon her lifelong upbringing in Tokyo. Eschewing traditional anime tropes for adult-themed subject matter, the movie was a surprise hit at the Japanese box office.

  • #19. Persepolis (2007)
    83/ 2.4.7. Films

    #19. Persepolis (2007)

    Metascore: 90
    Number of critic reviews: 31
    Directors: Marjane Satrapi, Vincent Paronnaud
    Runtime: 96 min.

    Graphic novelist Marjane Satrapi adapted her own comic when co-directing this autobiographical drama. Set in 1970s Iran, the story follows Satrapi as she comes of age during the Islamic Revolution. The movie's animation style plays it close to the original source material, leaping onto the screen in black and white.

  • #18. Finding Nemo (2003)
    84/ Buena Vista Pictures

    #18. Finding Nemo (2003)

    Metascore: 90
    Number of critic reviews: 38
    Directors: Andrew Stanton, Lee Unkrich
    Runtime: 100 min.

    Blending heart and humor as only Pixar can, this computer-animated adventure follows a timid clownfish named Marlin (voiced by Albert Brooks) as he searches for his missing son, Nemo. Helping Marlin wade through the vast ocean terrain is a forgetful blue tang by the name of Dory. Little do they realize that Nemo is stuck behind aquarium glass in a dentist's office with little time to spare.

  • #17. The Incredibles (2004)
    85/ Buena Vista Pictures

    #17. The Incredibles (2004)

    Metascore: 90
    Number of critic reviews: 41
    Director: Brad Bird
    Runtime: 115 min.

    Brad Bird's wildly popular action movie takes place in a world where superheroes have been banned, forcing the Incredibles family to live in hiding. As Bob Parr (aka Mr. Incredible) grapples with the doldrums of suburban life, he yearns to put his natural talents to work. He's eventually given a chance to wear the uniform once again, though the new job is not what it seems.

  • #16. Bambi (1942)
    86/ Disney

    #16. Bambi (1942)

    Metascore: 91
    Number of critic reviews: 16
    Directors: Bill Roberts, David Hand, Graham Heid, James Algar, Norman Wright, Paul Satterfield, Samuel Armstrong
    Runtime: 70 min.

    The story of a young deer named Bambi is as simple as it is profound, and still timeless after all these years. After a tragic opening, the movie chronicles the eponymous character as he comes of age in the forest. Chinese-American animator Tyrus Wong conceived the expressive look of the forest backgrounds, drawing upon ancient landscape paintings from the Song Dynasty (960–1279 A.D.).

  • #15. Waltz with Bashir (2008)
    87/ Columbia/Tristar

    #15. Waltz with Bashir (2008)

    Metascore: 91
    Number of critic reviews: 33
    Director: Ari Folman
    Runtime: 90 min.

    Israeli veteran Ari Folman explores Israel's war with Lebanon in 1982 through an animated lens in this vivid documentary. Plagued by his own inability to remember the war, Folman interviews other soldiers who were there. The director and his small team combined Adobe Flash cutouts, cel animation, and 3D drawings to bring history to life.

  • #14. The Triplets of Belleville (2003)
    88/ Les Armateurs

    #14. The Triplets of Belleville (2003)

    Metascore: 91
    Number of critic reviews: 35
    Director: Sylvain Chomet
    Runtime: 78 min.

    Sylvain Chomet's debut feature takes place during the Tour de France, and centers on the abduction of three competing cyclists. As a woman searches for the missing victims, she gets help from three former jazz legends known as The Triplets of Belleville. It all goes down in Chomet's stunning 2D drawing style, and with virtually no dialogue.

  • #13. Tower (2016)
    89/ Go-Valley

    #13. Tower (2016)

    Metascore: 92
    Number of critic reviews: 22
    Director: Keith Maitland
    Runtime: 96 min.

    Filmmaker Keith Maitland first heard about the 1966 shooting at the University of Texas in Austin from his seventh-grade history teacher, who was actually there. Years later, he returned with this animated documentary about the harrowing ordeal. The movie relies on rotoscoping to create a realistic aesthetic.

  • #12. Toy Story 3 (2010)
    90/ Disney/Pixar

    #12. Toy Story 3 (2010)

    Metascore: 92
    Number of critic reviews: 39
    Director: Lee Unkrich
    Runtime: 103 min.

    After getting stranded at a hostile day care center, the world's most famous toys square off against reckless toddlers and an evil bear named Lotso. So goes the third “Toy Story” movie, which finds Andy preparing for college and leaving his past behind. A fourth installment is scheduled for release this summer.

  • #11. Sita Sings the Blues (2009)
    91/ Nina Paley // WIkimedia Commons

    #11. Sita Sings the Blues (2009)

    Metascore: 93
    Number of critic reviews: 11
    Director: Nina Paley
    Runtime: 82 min.

    Film critic Roger Ebert was “swept away” by this animated musical from artist Nina Paley. The film juxtaposes a tale from the Ramayana with the breakup of the director's own marriage. Animation comes courtesy of Paley herself, who pairs the visuals with 1920s jazz vocals from Annette Hanshaw.

  • #10. Inside Out (2015)
    92/ Pixar Animation

    #10. Inside Out (2015)

    Metascore: 94
    Number of critic reviews: 55
    Directors: Pete Docter, Ronaldo Del Carmen
    Runtime: 94 min.

    This 3D computer-animated blockbuster takes viewers inside the mind of a girl named Riley, whose emotions are personified by a team of engaging personalities. As Riley cautiously navigates a new home and new city, her emotions likewise embark on a perilous journey. To appeal to as broad an audience as possible, the movie's creators changed minor details for different international markets.

  • #9. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1938)
    93/ Disney

    #9. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1938)

    Metascore: 95
    Number of critic reviews: 15
    Directors: Ben Sharpsteen, David Hand, Larry Morey, Perce Pearce, Wilfred Jackson, William Cottrell
    Runtime: 83 min.

    Seminal is hardly the word to describe this late-1930s classic, which was both Walt Disney's first animated feature and the first full-length animated film produced in North America. It also popularized Technicolor and became the most successful movie of its time. The story of Snow White could have sunk the studio, but it spawned an industry instead.

  • #8. Beauty and the Beast (1991)
    94/ Walt Disney Productions

    #8. Beauty and the Beast (1991)

    Metascore: 95
    Number of critic reviews: 22
    Directors: Gary Trousdale, Kirk Wise
    Runtime: 84 min.

    The recent live-action remake doesn't hold a talking candlestick to this animated original, about the relationship between a young beauty and a cursed beast. Should the beautiful Belle learn to love the beast, then a spell will lift and he'll turn back into a handsome prince. This was Disney's third film to incorporate digital animation, with the first two being “The Rescuers Down Under” and “The Little Mermaid.”

  • #7. Toy Story (1995)
    95/ Pixar Animation

    #7. Toy Story (1995)

    Metascore: 95
    Number of critic reviews: 26
    Director: John Lasseter
    Runtime: 81 min.

    Pixar's inaugural feature introduced audiences to Andy's incredible toys and the wonders of 3D computer animation. It finds Woody the cowboy getting jealous when Andy brings home his newest acquisition, a spaceman by the name of Buzz Lightyear. Family entertainment hasn't been the same since.

  • #6. WALL-E (2008)
    96/ Disney/Pixar

    #6. WALL-E (2008)

    Metascore: 95
    Number of critic reviews: 39
    Director: Andrew Stanton
    Runtime: 98 min.

    The second-best reviewed movie of 2008 was this computer-animated adventure from Pixar, which takes place in a grim future. After wading through literal mountains of trash, a lovable robot named WALL-E follows his newfound love interest onto a spaceship. It's here that he crosses paths with a careless species called Homo sapiens.

  • #5. Fantasia (1940)
    97/ The Walt Disney Company

    #5. Fantasia (1940)

    Metascore: 96
    Number of critic reviews: 18
    Directors: Ben Sharpsteen, Bill Roberts, David Hand, Ford Beebe Jr., Hamilton Luske, James Algar, Jim Handley, Norman Ferguson, Paul Satterfield, Samuel Armstrong, T. Hee, Wilfred Jackson
    Runtime: 125 min.

    Setting a tapestry of brilliant animation against a backdrop of classical music, “Fantasia” remains unlike anything else in the Disney canon (barring “Fantasia 2000,” that is). This iconic passion project might have been something of a failure in its day, but it's since become known as nothing short of a masterpiece. Even decades after its release, this one hasn't aged a day.

  • #4. Ratatouille (2007)
    98/ Don Bluth Productions

    #4. Ratatouille (2007)

    Metascore: 96
    Number of critic reviews: 37
    Director: Brad Bird
    Runtime: 111 min.

    Pixar's eighth feature film is also the studio's best-reviewed effort to date. It centers on an epicurean rat named Remy, who dreams of becoming a French chef. When he ends up in the kitchen of a once-famous restaurant, Remy gets to put his culinary skills to the test.

  • #3. Spirited Away (2002)
    99/ Studio Ghibli

    #3. Spirited Away (2002)

    Metascore: 96
    Number of critic reviews: 41
    Director: Hayao Miyazaki
    Runtime: 125 min.

    This epic fantasy finds Hayao Miyazaki at the top of his game and remains one of the most beloved animated films of all time. It follows a young girl into a fantastic parallel world, where gods roam and humans turn into beasts. This was the first anime film to be nominated for—and win—an Academy Award.

  • #2. Dumbo (1941)
    100/ The Walt Disney Company

    #2. Dumbo (1941)

    Metascore: 98
    Number of critic reviews: 10
    Directors: Ben Sharpsteen, Bill Roberts, Jack Kinney, John Elliotte, Norman Ferguson, Samuel Armstrong, Wilfred Jackson
    Runtime: 64 min.

    A bullied circus elephant named Dumbo learns to fly in this 1941 family film, which clocks in at a tight 64 minutes. Due to budget constraints, Disney cultivated a simpler animation style while emphasizing the story's emotional components. A live-action remake from Tim Burton is right around the corner.

  • #1. Pinocchio (1940)
    101/ Walt Disney Productions

    #1. Pinocchio (1940)

    Metascore: 99
    Number of critic reviews: 17
    Directors: Ben Sharpsteen, Bill Roberts, Hamilton Luske, Jack Kinney, Norman Ferguson, T. Hee, Wilfred Jackson
    Runtime: 88 min.

    With a current score of 99 on Metacritic, Disney's “Pinocchio” endures as the most critically acclaimed animated film of all time. It tells the story of a living puppet who must prove his worth if he wants to become a human boy. The animation is so iconic that William O'Connor of The Daily Beast attested this 1940 classic is “still the finest hand-drawn film ever.”

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