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50 consumer products with the highest injury rates

  • 50 consumer products with the highest injury rates

    Each year, millions of products are recalled from stores after companies determine their items pose a risk of serious or life-threatening injuries to consumers. In 2018, children’s snowsuits were recalled after buttons were found to be potential choking hazards. Earlier the same year, Swedish furniture company Ikea recalled one of its lamps after concerns emerged about glass detaching and falling on customers.

    Because common products often cause safety concerns, the analysts at Stacker set out to find the 50 consumer products with the highest injury rates. The data comes from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission National Electronic Injury Surveillance System Injury Estimates (NEISS), which ranks the consumer products with the highest estimated number of product-related injuries nationwide. The estimates are “based on a nationally representative probability sample of hospitals in the U.S.,” according to NEISS. Some of these listed are not explicitly products, but broader activities or objects that are categorized and tracked by the NEISS.

    The products are ranked from fewest to most estimated injuries in 2017, with the data updated in April 2018. While some products like trampolines pose obvious risks to injury, the #1 most injury-inducing product might surprise many readers. Note that the U.S. CPSC groups similar products together and does not rank brand name items by most estimated injuries.

    Read on to discover 50 consumer products with the highest injury rates.

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  • #50. Handrails, railings, or banisters

    Estimated injuries in 2017: 58,659 (+4.7% from 2016)
    Injuries per 100,000 people: 18
    Estimated injuries over 5 years (2013–2017): 54,827 per year (Rank: #50; 16.9 injuries per 100,000 people)
    Estimated injuries over 10 years (2008–2017): 52,498 per year (Rank: #49; 16.1 injuries per 100,000 people)
    Gender breakdown: Men: 28,820 injuries (49.1% of total injuries); Women: 29,839 injuries (50.9% of total injuries)
    Top age group affected: 0–9 years (9,723 injuries; 16.6% of total injuries)

    Handrails or banisters can be deadly for children who fall through them. The space between banisters can appear small, but some railings—especially those that have been grandfathered into safety standards—can be large enough for kids to squeeze through and fall.

  • #49. Drinking glasses

    Estimated injuries in 2017: 58,946 (-12% from 2016)
    Injuries per 100,000 people: 18.1
    Estimated injuries over 5 years (2013–2017): 66,187 per year (Rank: #43; 20.4 injuries per 100,000 people)
    Estimated injuries over 10 years (2008–2017): 73,260 per year (Rank: #41; 22.5 injuries per 100,000 people)
    Gender breakdown: Men: 26,105 injuries (44.3% of total injuries); Women: 32,841 injuries (55.7% of total injuries)
    Top age group affected: 20–29 years (15,815 injuries; 26.8% of total injuries)

    Drinking glasses, if broken, can cause injury to consumers ranging from small cuts to deep lacerations. Consumers should throw away any chipped, cracked, or broken drinking glasses to avoid cuts.


     

  • #48. Toys

    Estimated injuries in 2017: 59,008 (+1.9% from 2016)
    Injuries per 100,000 people: 18.1
    Estimated injuries over 5 years (2013–2017): 57,581 per year (Rank: #49; 17.7 injuries per 100,000 people)
    Estimated injuries over 10 years (2008–2017): 46,345 per year (Rank: #50; 14.3 injuries per 100,000 people)
    Gender breakdown: Men: 28,873 injuries (48.9% of total injuries); Women: 30,134 injuries (51.1% of total injuries)
    Top age group affected: 0–9 years (34,874 injuries; 59.1% of total injuries)

    When parents think of toy-related injuries, they often think of small toys that can be choking hazards to their children. Surprisingly, according to Stanford's Children's Health, riding toys like scooters, bikes, and tricycles are the “leading causes of toy-related injuries.”

  • #47. Metal containers

    Estimated injuries in 2017: 65,646 (+7.2% from 2016)
    Injuries per 100,000 people: 20.2
    Estimated injuries over 5 years (2013–2017): 65,244 per year (Rank: #45; 20.1 injuries per 100,000 people)
    Estimated injuries over 10 years (2008–2017): 71,949 per year (Rank: #42; 22.1 injuries per 100,000 people)
    Gender breakdown: Men: 27,829 injuries (42.4% of total injuries); Women: 37,817 injuries (57.6% of total injuries)
    Top age group affected: 20–29 years (11,241 injuries; 17.1% of total injuries)

    People often get injured when opening large metal containers such as shipping containers. Injuries can occur when using a crowbar or fork lift to open doors that are stuck. Using the proper technique and safety precautions when opening these containers can reduce the risk of injury.  

  • #46. Dancing (activity, apparel, or equipment)

    Estimated injuries in 2017: 65,839 (+11.7% from 2016)
    Injuries per 100,000 people: 20.2
    Estimated injuries over 5 years (2013–2017): 60,509 per year (Rank: #48; 18.6 injuries per 100,000 people)
    Estimated injuries over 10 years (2008–2017): 58,793 per year (Rank: #46; 18.1 injuries per 100,000 people)
    Gender breakdown: Men: 15,771 injuries (24% of total injuries); Women: 50,068 injuries (76% of total injuries)
    Top age group affected: 10–19 years (24,944 injuries; 37.9% of total injuries)

    According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, one of the most common injuries for dancers is a sprained ankle, often caused by poorly fitting shoes. Along with proper warm up regimens and avoiding overtraining, having proper fitting equipment can keep dancers safe.  

  • #45. Swimming pools

    Estimated injuries in 2017: 66,622 (-4.9% from 2016)
    Injuries per 100,000 people: 20.5
    Estimated injuries over 5 years (2013–2017): 68,761 per year (Rank: #41; 21.1 injuries per 100,000 people)
    Estimated injuries over 10 years (2008–2017): 73,431 per year (Rank: #40; 22.6 injuries per 100,000 people)
    Gender breakdown: Men: 36,016 injuries (54.1% of total injuries); Women: 30,606 injuries (45.9% of total injuries)
    Top age group affected: 0–9 years (23,927 injuries; 35.9% of total injuries)

    Pools are a great way to cool down in the heat of summer, but while fun, they pose an ever-present threat for injury, both fatal and nonfatal. According to the Centers for Disease Control, drownings are the fifth leading cause of accidental injury death in the U.S. Nonfatal injuries can include traumatic brain injuries from diving in shallow pools, or broken bones from slipping on pool decks.

  • #44. Counters or countertops

    Estimated injuries in 2017: 69,337 (+8.2% from 2016)
    Injuries per 100,000 people: 21.3
    Estimated injuries over 5 years (2013–2017): 61,660 per year (Rank: #47; 19 injuries per 100,000 people)
    Estimated injuries over 10 years (2008–2017): 58,219 per year (Rank: #47; 17.9 injuries per 100,000 people)
    Gender breakdown: Men: 30,042 injuries (43.3% of total injuries); Women: 39,295 injuries (56.7% of total injuries)
    Top age group affected: 0–9 years (20,519 injuries; 29.6% of total injuries)

    Children experience the highest injury rates with counters and countertops, because they climb onto countertops and can fall. Along with not allowing kids to climb on them, parents shouldn't use countertops as changing tables, as serious injury can occur if kids fall off.

  • #43. Exercise equipment

    Estimated injuries in 2017: 69,355 (+5.2% from 2016)
    Injuries per 100,000 people: 21.3
    Estimated injuries over 5 years (2013–2017): 64,520 per year (Rank: #46; 19.8 injuries per 100,000 people)
    Estimated injuries over 10 years (2008–2017): 61,790 per year (Rank: #45; 19 injuries per 100,000 people)
    Gender breakdown: Men: 33,755 injuries (48.7% of total injuries); Women: 35,600 injuries (51.3% of total injuries)
    Top age group affected: 10–19 years (9,707 injuries; 14% of total injuries)

    Well-intentioned consumers often fill their at-home gyms with the newest exercise equipment, but they often don't consider the risk of injury that comes from using machines and free weights. While most exercise equipment injuries such as pulled muscles result from overexertion, some people sustain injuries from falling weights. To reduce serious injury, some exercise equipment like treadmills have safety clips that triggers the machine to stop if the user drifts too far back.

  • #42. Fishing (activity, apparel, or equipment)

    Estimated injuries in 2017: 70,609 (-0.2% from 2016)
    Injuries per 100,000 people: 21.7
    Estimated injuries over 5 years (2013–2017): 68,949 per year (Rank: #40; 21.2 injuries per 100,000 people)
    Estimated injuries over 10 years (2008–2017): 70,222 per year (Rank: #43; 21.6 injuries per 100,000 people)
    Gender breakdown: Men: 56,250 injuries (79.7% of total injuries); Women: 14,358 injuries (20.3% of total injuries)
    Top age group affected: 10–19 years (12,403 injuries; 17.6% of total injuries)

    For most people, fishing is a relaxing and fun activity for all ages, but when not careful, people can sustain penetration injuries from fishing hooks and harpoons. To avoid injury, fishers should always close their tackle boxes to ensure no one accidentally steps on a hook. When casting a line, they should make sure no one stands too close to the line.

  • #41. Door sills or frames

    Estimated injuries in 2017: 73,061 (+4.9% from 2016)
    Injuries per 100,000 people: 22.5
    Estimated injuries over 5 years (2013–2017): 67,711 per year (Rank: #42; 20.8 injuries per 100,000 people)
    Estimated injuries over 10 years (2008–2017): 64,297 per year (Rank: #44; 19.8 injuries per 100,000 people)
    Gender breakdown: Men: 30,203 injuries (41.3% of total injuries); Women: 42,858 injuries (58.7% of total injuries)
    Top age group affected: 0–9 years (14,192 injuries; 19.4% of total injuries)

    A door sill is a horizontal piece of material, often wood or metal, that serves as the bottom framework for a door. If door sills raise above the ground too high, they can prove to be tripping hazards.

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