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How much millennials make in each state

  • How much millennials make in each state

    Millennials are more diverse and better educated than the generations before them. But while this group makes up a large portion of today's American workforce, their entry into it came at a time of economic turmoil. And that has created a generation of workers relocating to where jobs are available—and lucrative.

    States throughout the country provide different opportunities, according to their variety of industries, real estate markets, unemployment rates, and a number of other factors. Depending on the type of business, what incentives state and local governments provide, and the overall cost of living, some states are more attractive to this generation than others. Stacker scoured data from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis’s 2016 American Community Survey to determine household median incomes, unemployment rates, and the percentage of workforce participation as they apply to millennials.

    The last of the millennials are on their way out of college and into the workforce. Here, check out how your home state ranks for opportunities or millennials compared with others.

  • #50. New Mexico

    Millennial adjusted household median income: $51,893 (3.9% above median household income for all ages)
    Millennial % of population: 25.3% (#26 highest among all states)
    Millennial unemployment: 7.2% (#48 lowest among all states)
    Millennial labor force participation: 77.7% (#49 highest among all states)

    Millennials are struggling the most in the state of New Mexico, with the state ranked last in pay for the demographic. The Land of Enchantment has had trouble retaining young and educated people, who often leave New Mexico for job opportunities elsewhere. Millennials that do stay are reportedly locking to metro Albuquerque and finding value in refurbished homes.

  • #49. Mississippi

    Millennial adjusted household median income: $53,269 (10.2% above median household income for all ages)
    Millennial % of population: 25.2% (Tied for #29 highest among all states)
    Millennial unemployment: 8.0% (#49 lowest among all states)
    Millennial labor force participation: 78.2% (#47 highest among all states)

    From 2010 to 2016, 3.6% of millennials left Mississippi—double the percentage of other Southern states. Some local politicians speculate that the state’s rural landscape is a large contributing factor to the exodus. Other former Mississippi residents cited a social environment dominated by “incredible racism and bigotry.”

  • #48. Florida

    Millennial adjusted household median income: $54,889 (7.6% above median household income for all ages)
    Millennial % of population: 24.8% (Tied for #38 highest among all states)
    Millennial unemployment: 5.6% (#35 lowest among all states)
    Millennial labor force participation: 81.6% (#34 highest among all states)

    Retention of millennials isn’t the only statistic where Florida ranks low. The state’s metrics in education, health, and especially civil engagement are all well below that of other states. The state is in the top-fourth percentile for millennials who still live at home with their parents, with some metropolitan areas in Florida ranked as some of the worst areas to earn a wage in the country. Millennials who remain are able to find affordable living in Orlando and Jacksonville.

  • #47. Louisiana

    Millennial adjusted household median income: $56,377 (12.9% above median household income for all ages)
    Millennial % of population: 26.8% (#12 highest among all states)
    Millennial unemployment: 6.7% (#47 lowest among all states)
    Millennial labor force participation: 78.4% (#46 highest among all states)

    Industries that thrive in Louisiana include agriculture and energy, which for a time did not do much to attract millennials from other states. In recent years, areas such as Baton Rouge have received an influx of millennials, with flexible work schedules and vibrant communities being cited for this shift. Affordability in urban areas, at least compared to other states, has apparently been the draw for these new Louisiana residents.

  • #46. Arkansas

    Millennial adjusted household median income: $57,312 (12.3% above median household income for all ages)
    Millennial % of population: 25.0% (Tied for #36 highest among all states)
    Millennial unemployment: 5.0% (#24 lowest among all states)
    Millennial labor force participation: 78.0% (#48 highest among all states)

    Some communities in Arkansas are working to reverse millennial flight from the state, utilizing mapping technology to gain insight and data on how to keep millennials in the workforce there. These communities are trying to attract new and small businesses in the state while also promoting safety and “fun attractions.” Additional strategies include making roads and city districts more friendly for walking and biking.

  • #45. Tennessee

    Millennial adjusted household median income: $57,735 (7.3% above median household income for all ages)
    Millennial % of population: 25.9% (#19 highest among all states)
    Millennial unemployment: 5.4% (#26 lowest among all states)
    Millennial labor force participation: 79.8% (#41 highest among all states)

    Tennessee has struggled in the past to keep millennials in the state, but cities like Nashville have been increasing retention lately. Forbes magazine rated the city high up on a list of U.S. cities experiencing job growth in such industries as health care, education, entertainment, manufacturing, distribution, and technology.

  • #44. South Carolina

    Millennial adjusted household median income: $57,969 (5.7% above median household income for all ages)
    Millennial % of population: 25.3% (Tied for #26 highest among all states)
    Millennial unemployment: 5.7% (#36 lowest among all states)
    Millennial labor force participation: 81.6% (#35 highest among all states)

    Quality of life for millennials here is considered to be low because of high unemployment rates and low civic engagement. The City of Columbia, a bright spot, was found to have gained the second-highest number of millennials of any city in the state in 2017. The arts scene and multinational companies like Capgemini offering incentives for employees are just a few reasons why some millennials are choosing to stay.

  • #43. West Virginia

    Millennial adjusted household median income: $58,226 (17.6% above median household income for all ages)
    Millennial % of population: 24.0% (#45 highest among all states)
    Millennial unemployment: 8.2% (#50 lowest among all states)
    Millennial labor force participation: 76.1% (#50 highest among all states)

    West Virginia reportedly has a high percentage of millennials still living with their parents and suffering from depression. The state also ranks last in quality of life and economic health. Some millennials are urging West Virginia officials to diversify the state’s economy beyond that of coal, which has historically been a major part of the state’s identity. The organization Generation West Virginia has started a program called Impact Fellowship, which provides one-year state fellowships for in-state employers.

  • #42. Nevada

    Millennial adjusted household median income: $58,399 (3.1% above median household income for all ages)
    Millennial % of population: 27.7% (Tied for #6 highest among all states)
    Millennial unemployment: 6.2% (#44 lowest among all states)
    Millennial labor force participation: 82.4% (#29 highest among all states)

    Compared with other Western states, Nevada falters when it comes to education, affordability, and health. Still, the median income for millennials is competitive compared with bordering states. This group makes up the largest voting bloc in the state, but still faces economic challenges, particularly in the housing market.

  • #41. North Carolina

    Millennial adjusted household median income: $58,818 (5.7% above median household income for all ages)
    Millennial % of population: 25.9% (Tied for #19 highest among all states)
    Millennial unemployment: 6.0% (#43 lowest among all states)
    Millennial labor force participation: 82.5% (#28 highest among all states)

    In 2018, studies showed that millennials began moving en masse to North Carolina cities such as Charlotte. The city’s growth has been chalked up to education programs and development of the food, beverage, and restaurant industries. With the number of millennials expected to surpass that of baby boomers, millennials are becoming a highly sought-out demographic for the workforce.

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