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100 worst sci-fi movies of all time

  • 100 worst sci-fi movies of all time
    1/ Esse Ci Cinematografica

    100 worst sci-fi movies of all time

    Quality science fiction cinema remains not just a visual document of mankind’s own potential, but an ongoing foray into the possibilities of the medium itself. The output in 2017 was naturally no exception, with entries like "Blade Runner: 2049," "Logan," and the upcoming "Star Wars: The Last Jedi" each exploring prescient human archetypes against a limitless expanse of imaginative terrains, situations, and characters. Even when dystopian vibes persist, audiences still exit the theater with their jaws agape. That’s the magic of sci-fi cinema. 

    However, as compelling as great science fiction can be, terrible science fiction retains its own special place in the annals of cinematic history. Whether filled with clumsy acting, shoddy special effects, amateur directing or all of the above, bad sci-fi has become its own rich tradition complete with cult followings and midnight screenings. To think, there’d be no "Mystery Science Theater 3000" without these classic clunkers.

    In celebration of campy sci-fi excess, Stacker has ranked the worst 100 sci-fi movies of all time. For the analysis, we’ve built an index (the Stacker Score) that combines IMDb ratings and Rotten Tomatoes Audience Scores. To qualify, a film needed to have at least 1,500 IMDb votes. Stacker Scores are based on a 1-100 scale; and now, we present the 100 worst sci-fi movies of all time.
     

    You may also like: 100 best sci-fi films of all time, according to critics

  • #100: The Incredible Melting Man
    2/ Quartet Productions

    #100: The Incredible Melting Man

    Year released: 1977

    Stacker Score: 31.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.9
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 24%

    He’s melting! He’s melting! So went the story of "The Incredible Melting Man," about an astronaut who returns from space and slowly degenerates into a murderous blob. The budget for this tone-deaf turkey was apparently so low that the producers couldn’t even afford stock footage of Saturn for the opening sequence, substituting public domain footage of the sun and a satellite moon instead. Shot in just fourteen days, the movie featured a cameo from future acclaimed director Jonathan Demme, possibly the best thing it had going for it.

  • #99: Double Dragon
    3/ American International Pictures

    #99: Double Dragon

    Year released: 1994

    Stacker Score: 31.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.7
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 26%

    1988 video game "Double Dragon" was a worldwide smash in arcades and on Nintendo systems. By contrast, 1994 movie "Double Dragon" was a cheesy box office dud that didn’t do the game’s legacy any justice. The movie took place in a futuristic wasteland and involved two brothers squaring off against an evil gang over a powerful Chinese medallion. To call the movie the quintessence of cheese would be putting it lightly.

  • #98: The Killer Shrews
    4/ Hollywood Pictures Corporation

    #98: The Killer Shrews

    Year released: 1959

    Stacker Score: 31.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.8
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 24%

    Not to be confused with ill-tempered women made famous by Shakespeare, shrews are small rodent-like animals with long snouts and tiny eyes. In 1959’s "The Killer Shrews," the little creatures terrorize a group of people stranded on an island during a hurricane. For close-ups of the shrews, the director went with hand puppets. For long shots, he went with coon dogs. In spite of its poor reception and bad special effects, the movie actually turned a handsome profit for its time.

  • #97: Mortal Kombat: Annihilation
    5/ Threshold Entertainment / Midway Games

    #97: Mortal Kombat: Annihilation

    Year released: 1997

    Stacker Score: 31.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.7
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 25%

    Awash with redundant action sequences, dated electronic music and wooden performances, "Mortal Kombat: Annihilation" was the paltry follow up to a much better first installment. The video-game based movie, which pitted a group of martial artists against extra-dimensional invaders, was so bad that game creator Ed Boon himself dubbed it the worst moment in the franchise’s history.

  • #96: Trog
    6/ Herman Cohen Productions

    #96: Trog

    Year released: 1970

    Stacker Score: 31.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.6
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 26%

    As anyone who saw FX’s "Feud" is likely to know, "Trog" was Joan Crawford’s final and arguably worst effort. In the film, Crawford played an anthropologist trying to communicate with a troglodyte dressed in an ape suit leftover from Kubrick’s "2001: A Space Odyssey." According to legend, Crawford provided her own wardrobe due to budget constraints, and later claimed she might have killed herself from embarrassment if not for a late stage conversion to Christian Science. In spite of all the terribleness, the movie was the top grossing film in the USA in its first week of release.

  • #95: Reptilicus
    7/ Saga Studio

    #95: Reptilicus

    Year released: 1963

    Stacker Score: 31.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.6
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 26%

    Big, prehistoric monsters commonly make for epically campy sci-fi movies. Take 1963’s "Reptilicus" for instance, a monster movie only worth watching for all the unintentional laughs. Among its other achievements in comedy was a quick appearance in a "South Park" episode (“Cancelled”).

  • #94: Dinocroc
    8/ Greenleaf Productions

    #94: Dinocroc

    Year released: 2004

    Stacker Score: 31.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.1
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 31%

    Presented by Roger Corman, aka the king of B movies himself, was 2004’s "Dinocroc." It detailed the misadventures of a reanimated prehistoric crocodile that escapes from a lab, grows substantially and devours everything in its path. As one might expect, the film is an all-you-can-eat buffet of rough acting and cheesy special effects.

  • #93: C.H.U.D. II: Bud the Chud
    9/ Management Company Entertainment Group

    #93: C.H.U.D. II: Bud the Chud

    Year released: 1989

    Stacker Score: 30.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.8
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 23%

    1984’s "C.H.U.D." was a camp classic about a bunch of sewer-dwelling zombies. However, the 1989 sequel, "C.H.U.D. II: Bud the Chud," was dead on arrival. This time around, it’s a Chud named Bud chewing brains and spreading infections. Look for a cameo from scream king Robert Englund, and then put something better on.

  • #92: R.O.T.O.R.
    10/ Manson International

    #92: R.O.T.O.R.

    Year released: 1988

    Stacker Score: 30.50
    IMDb User Rating: 2.4
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 37%

    With a story ripped straight out of "RoboCop," and VHS artwork ripped straight out of "Mad Max," 1988’s "R.O.T.O.R." was about as derivative as a movie could get. The cinematic tale of a cyborg crime fighter was executed so poorly that the screenwriter has since disowned it, laying all the blame squarely at the director’s feet.

  • #91: Galaxina
    11/ Marimark Productions

    #91: Galaxina

    Year released: 1980

    Stacker Score: 29.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.5
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 24%

    As part of a genre that might be best dubbed “spaceploitation,” 1980’s "Galaxina" was a particularly inept movie about a voluptuous, 31st century android with feelings. The clunker was directed by the same man who made "The Incredible Melting Man" and famously starred Playboy centerfold Dorothy Stratten as the emotional robot.

    Tragically, Statten was murdered by a jealous boyfriend the same year the film was released.

  • #90: Carnosaur
    12/ Hollywood Pictures Corporation

    #90: Carnosaur

    Year released: 1993

    Stacker Score: 29.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.5
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 23%

    Nothing quite captured the essence of straight-to-video schlock in the early to mid-90s the way "Carnosaur" did. Produced by Roger Corman, the "Jurassic Park" knock-off was shot in just 18 days with the cheesy visuals to show for it. Meanwhile, a healthy return on investment yielded some inevitable, and equally awful, sequels, at least one of which appears elsewhere on this list.

  • #89: Pterodactyl
    13/ New Line Cinema

    #89: Pterodactyl

    Year released: 2005

    Stacker Score: 29.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.1
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 27%

    In the 2005 film "Pterodactyl," a bunch of dinosaur eggs hatched inside a remote volcano and gave way to pure cinematic garbage. Laden with poor CGI, the movie was made for lovers of schlock, who thereby watched it and skewered it with equal relish.

  • #88: The Sand
    14/ Herman Cohen Productions

    #88: The Sand

    Year released: 2015

    Stacker Score: 28.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.8
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 18%

    When it comes to sci-fi and horror, virtually anything can be turned into a vicious antagonist. For proof of the fact, look no further than "The Sand," which featured the beach itself as a carnivorous monster. Shot in just twelve days, the movie was reportedly a remake of 1980’s "Blood Beach," as if that marginally better film warranted revisiting.

  • #87: World of the Dead: The Zombie Diaries 2
    15/ Bleeding Edge Films

    #87: World of the Dead: The Zombie Diaries 2

    Year released: 2011

    Stacker Score: 28.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.8
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 18%

    By 2011, zombie fever was more or less everywhere, which naturally led to a slew of poorly made zombie movies, each one vying for all the cash audiences could spare. Enter "The Zombie Diaries 2," a miserable excuse for a film that willed itself into existence on the heels of the slightly less terrible "Zombie Diaries." Rife with tacky violence and stilted performances, "Zombie Diaries 2" was appropriately brainless.

  • #86: The Clonus Horror
    16/ Saga Studio

    #86: The Clonus Horror

    Year released: 1979

    Stacker Score: 28.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.4
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 22%

    Starring Peter Graves, "The Clonus Horror" was about a government experiment where politicians tried to clone themselves in order to achieve immortality. While the film did tout an intriguing premise, it nevertheless offered little more than standard B movie indulgence. Meanwhile, the director ended up suing 2005 Michael Bay film "The Island" for stealing "The Clonus Horror’s" storyline.

  • #85: The Adventures of Pluto Nash
    17/ Concorde-New Horizons

    #85: The Adventures of Pluto Nash

    Year released: 2002

    Stacker Score: 27.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.8
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 17%

    Eddie Murphy was once an undisputed king of Hollywood, but "The Adventures of Pluto Nash" nearly sent him into exile. That’s in no small part thanks to the sheer terribleness of the comedic misfire, reportedly the biggest money loser in movie history. More than just a box office bomb, this movie was a nuclear explosion of epic failure.

  • #84: Beginning of the End
    18/ AB-PT Pictures Corp.

    #84: Beginning of the End

    Year released: 1957

    Stacker Score: 27.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.5
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 20%

    One might hear the words “giant killer grasshoppers” and already brace him or herself for some genuine cinematic schlock. Suffice to say, "Beginning of the End" lives up to the B movie hype. As it turned out, the real horror went down behind the scenes, whereas the 200 live grasshoppers used for the movie all ate one another, and were down to a dozen by the time filming ended.

  • #83: Killers from Space
    19/ Management Company Entertainment Group (MCEG)

    #83: Killers from Space

    Year released: 1954

    Stacker Score: 27.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.1
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 24%

    Peter Graves made quite a career for himself starring in bad sci-fi movies, "Killers from Space" among them. In the film, Graves played a scientist and pilot who went missing after a mission, only to turn up later saying he was captured by the aliens. Was he telling the truth? Unfortunately, we may never know, since finding out would arguably require sitting through this dull mess of a film.

  • #82: Tale of the Mummy
    20/ Manson International

    #82: Tale of the Mummy

    Year released: 1998

    Stacker Score: 27.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.8
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 16%

    Tom Cruise might have tanked in the latest attempt to rejuvenate the mummy franchise, but hopefully the failure of 1998’s "Tale of the Mummy" helps him sleep at night. The movie dealt with the typical mummy story in particularly inept fashion, duly running out of steam after a somewhat promising first act.

  • #81: The Amazing Transparent Man
    21/ Marimark Productions

    #81: The Amazing Transparent Man

    Year released: 1960

    Stacker Score: 27.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.8
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 16%

    Years before "The Incredible Melting Man," there was "The Amazing Transparent Man." Part zombie movie, part HG Wells rip off, the film was about a mad scientist trying to establish an army of invisible zombies. The premise alone was brutal, and the execution naturally followed suit.

  • #80: S. Darko
    22/ New Horizons Picture

    #80: S. Darko

    Year released: 2009

    Stacker Score: 27.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.6
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 18%

    2001’s "Donnie Darko" was not just an instant cult classic, but a prime slice of modern-day auteur filmmaking at its finest. That alone made follow up "S. Darko"—which didn’t involve "Donnie Darko" creator Richard Kelly at all—a blasphemous endeavor from the get-go. The fact that "S. Darko" also happened to be awful was like expired icing on an already rotten cake.

  • #79: The Giant Gila Monster
    23/ Hollywood Pictures Corporation

    #79: The Giant Gila Monster

    Year released: 1959

    Stacker Score: 27.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.3
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 21%

    From Ray Kellogg, director of previously mentioned turkey "The Killer Shrews," came 1959’s "The Giant Gila Monster." The title pretty much spoke for itself, and audiences were presumably prepared for pure midnight movie madness. What they got in return was a normal-sized lizard destroying toy trucks and other blatant, miniature props. 

  • #78: Village of the Giants
    24/ Berkeley Productions

    #78: Village of the Giants

    Year released: 1965

    Stacker Score: 27.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.3
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 21%

    Filmed in “Perceptovision” (which was as gimmicky as it sounds), "Village of the Giants" was a tale about a bunch of teenagers who grow 30 feet tall and terrorize their town. It might sound like the stuff of teenage fantasy, but poor execution made it a largely forgettable endeavor. It did, however, feature some choice cameos from the likes of Toni Basil and Ron Howard.

  • #77: Carnosaur 3: Primal Species
    25/ Concorde-New Horizons

    #77: Carnosaur 3: Primal Species

    Year released: 1996

    Stacker Score: 27.00
    IMDb User Rating: 2.9
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 25%

    The first "Carnosaur" was bad, and the third one was arguably worse. This time around, a group of terrorists receive an unexpected surprise when their cargo turns out to be filled with dinosaurs. The movie was originally a standalone film entitled "Primal Species," but ended up becoming part of the "Carnosaur" franchise. Such a move made perfect sense, given how awful both the film and the franchise were, after all. 

  • #76: Batman & Robin
    26/ American World Pictures (AWP)

    #76: Batman & Robin

    Year released: 1997

    Stacker Score: 26.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.7
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 16%

    While largely a superhero flick, "Batman & Robin" took a turn into the sci-fi realm with two scientists named Mr. Freeze and Poison Ivy, who unleashed plenty of campy chaos in Gotham. Big budgeted films rarely get more silly and disappointing than "Batman & Robin."

  • #75: Black Mask 2: City of Masks
    27/ China Star Entertainment

    #75: Black Mask 2: City of Masks

    Year released: 2002

    Stacker Score: 26.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.6
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 17%

    The original "Black Mask" starred iconic martial artist Jet Li, and the franchise itself had nowhere to go but down in his absence. Accordingly, "Black Mask 2: City of Masks" was as stupid as it sounded, following the adventures of a genetically mutated superhero not played by Jet Li. Among Black Mask’s many powers was the ability to heal, yet no healing power in the world could put this mess of a movie back together.

  • #74: Ballistic: Ecks vs. Sever
    28/ Allegra Pictures

    #74: Ballistic: Ecks vs. Sever

    Year released: 2002

    Stacker Score: 26.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.6
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 17%

    Starring Antonio Banderas and Lucy Liu, 2002’s "Ballistic: Ecks vs Sever" was about two enemy agents who team up to fight a common foe. The movie truly fired on all cylinders of awfulness, replete with bad dialogue, bad acting and bad action sequences alike. So legendary was the terribleness of this dud that it’s considered the “worst reviewed movie of all time” on Rotten Tomatoes.

  • #73: Attack of the Giant Leeches
    29/ Bleeding Edge Films

    #73: Attack of the Giant Leeches

    Year released: 1960

    Stacker Score: 26.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.5
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 18%

    A swarm of giant killer leeches might sound like the stuff of nightmares, but the most horrifying thing about "Attack of the Giant Leeches" was primarily the film’s execution. Produced by Roger Corman’s brother Gene, the movie was shot in a mere eight days on a $70,000 budget. According to legend, Corman couldn’t afford to pay the camera grip enough extra money to go in the swamp water, and thereby did it himself. He grew sick as a result and even spent a few days in the hospital.

  • #72: Super Shark
    30/ Clonus Associates

    #72: Super Shark

    Year released: 2011

    Stacker Score: 26.50
    IMDb User Rating: 2.5
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 28%

    With over 150 credits to his name, director Fred Olen Ray has released enough cinematic garbage to stink up a movie theater for days. However, 2011’s "Super Shark" was particularly rancid drek from the Olen Ray canon. The film was about a poorly rendered CGI shark with a penchant for eating people. In other words, it was about the same thing that all the other bad 2000s shark movies were about. 

  • #71: Superman IV: The Quest for Peace
    31/ Castle Rock Entertainment

    #71: Superman IV: The Quest for Peace

    Year released: 1987

    Stacker Score: 26.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.7
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 15%

    It’s safe to say that most franchises run out of steam by the fourth installment. For evidence, look no further than "Superman IV: The Quest for Peace," a failure in every imaginable way. In the film, Superman squared off against Nuclear Man in stunningly campy fashion. Christopher Reeve co-wrote the story, and yet that didn’t stop him from declaring it a “catastrophe from start to finish.” 

  • #70: The Avengers
    32/ AB-PT Pictures Corp.

    #70: The Avengers

    Year released: 1998

    Stacker Score: 26.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.7
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 15%

    Before the Marvel Avengers that fanboys know and love today, there was a British TV spy series of the same name. In 1998, that series got a film of its own, and the results were spectacularly horrendous. Starring Uma Thurman and Ralph Fiennes, "The Avengers" was so bad that it was partly responsible for co-star Sean Connery leaving show business altogether a few years later (after another action film of his bombed).

  • #69: Santa Claus Conquers the Martians
    33/ Jalor Productions

    #69: Santa Claus Conquers the Martians

    Year released: 1964

    Stacker Score: 26.00
    IMDb User Rating: 2.5
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 27%

    The premise of 1964’s "Santa Claus Conquers the Martians" feels like something dreamt up by a bored ten-year-old in Sunday school. The movie was about poor, lonely martians who had no one to give Christmas presents to their children. To remedy their dire situation, the martians kidnap Santa Claus, naturally. In the end, Santa wins over the martians by bringing them holiday cheer.

  • #68: The Last Sentinel
    34/ Planet Filmplays

    #68: The Last Sentinel

    Year released: 2007

    Stacker Score: 25.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.8
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 13%

    Filmmaker Jesse Johnson apparently wrote the script for 2007’s "The Last Sentinel" while still in his teens. And it certainly showed. The movie, about a group of drone police who turn on their creators, featured martial arts legend Don “The Dragon” Wilson. However, that couldn’t save it from the doldrums of bad cinema history.

  • #67: Bats
    35/ 7th Voyage

    #67: Bats

    Year released: 1999

    Stacker Score: 25.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.7
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 14%

    Super intelligent, genetically mutated bats have escaped from the lab and launched an attack on humanity, and it’s up to a local Sheriff to stop them. So went 1999’s "Bats," a movie that was marginally better than its poor reputation might suggest, but still pretty atrocious. To create the bats, the filmmakers use a combination of CGI, animatronics and two live bats imported from Indonesia.

  • #66: Horror Planet
    36/ Miller Consolidated Pictures (MCP)

    #66: Horror Planet

    Year released: 1981

    Stacker Score: 25.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.6
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 15%

    With "Horror Planet," what could have been a respectable horror movie in experienced hands ended up as poorly received schlock. In the movie, a group of interplanetary archaeologists are under attack after one of them gets impregnated by an alien and turns into a homicidal maniac. Ultimately, the best thing going for this movie was a synth-based soundtrack and some cool retro box art.

  • #65: Alligator II: The Mutation
    37/ Silver Nitrate

    #65: Alligator II: The Mutation

    Year released: 1991

    Stacker Score: 25.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.5
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 15%

    Putting a clever spin on an urban legend, 1980’s "Alligator" was a relatively scary movie that earned a healthy cult following. However, the second time wasn’t the charm with "Alligator II: The Mutation." One of the movie’s many cinematic crimes was that didn’t give audiences enough alligator. Another was that it was just plain bad.

  • #64: 2001: A Space Travesty
    38/ Cinevent

    #64: 2001: A Space Travesty

    Year released: 2002

    Stacker Score: 25.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.4
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 16%

    True to its name, "2001: A Space Travesty" was a travesty indeed. The poorly made comedy was zany in spirit only, and almost exclusively cloying for audiences. It starred Leslie Nielsen of "Naked Gun" fame, but he’d come a long way from his brilliant days as Lt. Frank Drebin.  

  • #63: The Puma Man
    39/ Hollywood Pictures Corporation

    #63: The Puma Man

    Year released: 1980

    Stacker Score: 25.00
    IMDb User Rating: 2.1
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 29%

    Duly worthy of its appearance on "Mystery Science Theater 3000" is the low-budget Italian flick "The Puma-Man." Actor Donald Pleasence once referred to it as the worst movie he’d ever starred in, and that’s saying a lot because he’s been in some genuine stinkers.

  • #62: Captain America
    40/ Berkeley Productions

    #62: Captain America

    Year released: 1990

    Stacker Score: 24.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.3
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 16%

    If one ever needs a reason as to why Marvel ended up creating its own studio and taking matters into their own hands, look no further than 1990’s "Captain America." The story of a patriotic super-soldier unfrozen from ice and sent into battle had never looked so bland. Rumor has it that production was a fiasco from the get-go, with constant financial difficulties. That said, supposedly Stan Lee was a big fan of the movie.

  • #61: Return of the Living Dead: Rave to the Grave
    41/ Concorde-New Horizons

    #61: Return of the Living Dead: Rave to the Grave

    Year released: 2005

    Stacker Score: 24.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.2
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 17%

    In the mid-1980s, zombies were given new life and even some comedic breadth with the cult classic, "Return of the Living Dead." How that ultimately led to 2005’s "Return of the Living Dead: Rave to the Grave" is anyone’s guess. The movie—about a college campus drug that accidentally wakes the dead—reeked of straight-to-video production and bad special effects.

  • #60: The Astro-Zombies
    42/ Warner Bros.

    #60: The Astro-Zombies

    Year released: 1968

    Stacker Score: 24.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.1
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 18%

    Shot in six days and made for just $37,000, 1968’s "The Astro-Zombies" was about a mad scientist who creates a body, which ends up going on a killing spree. In spite of being one of the worst movies ever made, the film does retain a certain vintage allure, which is perhaps why rock band Misfits named a song after it.

  • #59: Baby Geniuses
    43/ China Star Entertainment

    #59: Baby Geniuses

    Year released: 1999

    Stacker Score: 24.50
    IMDb User Rating: 2.6
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 23%

    Director Bob Clark was responsible for notable classics like "A Christmas Story and Porky’s," which means he gets a pass for the "Baby Geniuses" franchise. The original ranks among famous critic Roger Ebert’s most hated movies all time, and with good reason. While the babies are super intelligent, the same can’t be said for the film.

  • #58: Parasite
    44/ Franchise Pictures

    #58: Parasite

    Year released: 1982

    Stacker Score: 24.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.5
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 13%

    Directed by B movie horror legend Charles Band, and starring a young Demi Moore, 1982 sci-fi flick "Parasite" was a box office success in spite of its ineptitude. In the movie, Moore helps the protagonist eradicate a deadly parasite from his stomach before it kills him. The film—while predictably lackluster—was referenced in a slew of subsequent movies and the 1988 video game "Splatterhouse" as well.

  • #57: War of the Colossal Beast
    45/ Roger Corman Productions

    #57: War of the Colossal Beast

    Year released: 1958

    Stacker Score: 24.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.3
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 15%

    As part of a series, "War of the Colossal Beast" continued the misadventures of “The Amazing Colossal Man,” a military man who grows in size after being exposed to radiation. They thought he was dead after he took a spill in the Hoover Dam, but as it turns out in this installment, he’s alive, disfigured and hungry. The movie was in black and white except for the last minute, which was in color for some reason.

  • #56: Return of the Living Dead: Necropolis
    46/ Denholm Trading Inc.

    #56: Return of the Living Dead: Necropolis

    Year released: 2005

    Stacker Score: 24.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.2
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 16%

    Fans of the "Return of the Living Dead" franchise saw "Rave to the Grave" and said, “It can’t get any worse.” To which "Necropolis" replied, “Hold my beer.” Needless to say, this particular story of zombies run amok was horrifically inept, even when compared to bad zombie movies.

  • #55: Battle for Skyark
    47/ BoomGates

    #55: Battle for Skyark

    Year released: 2015

    Stacker Score: 24.00
    IMDb User Rating: 2.8
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 20%

    "Battle for Skyark" was a recent film set on a future Earth, where an orphan flees from monsters while discovering he has a greater purpose in the world. The movie tried to make the most out of its $2.5 million budget but ultimately fell far short of any conceivable goal. Unless, of course, the film’s goal was to end up being reviled by audiences and critics alike.

  • #54: The Devil's Tomb
    48/ Ice Cold Productions

    #54: The Devil's Tomb

    Year released: 2008

    Stacker Score: 23.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.7
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 10%

    Cuba Gooding Jr. once said “show me the money,” and we’re assuming that’s exactly what got him on board for "The Devil’s Tomb," a 2008 crash course in bad filmmaking. Along for the ride were other reputable talents like Henry Rollins and Ron Perlman, who couldn’t save the thriller from being a meandering, poorly made mess.

  • #53: Area 407
    49/ Cannon Films

    #53: Area 407

    Year released: 2012

    Stacker Score: 23.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.6
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 11%

    In 2012’s found footage movie "Area 407," a group of plane crash survivors face off against predators in a government testing area. Filming was completed after five days and all the dialogue was ad-libbed by the actors. 

  • #52: 51
    50/ Warner Bros.

    #52: 51

    Year released: 2011

    Stacker Score: 23.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.5
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 12%

    Yet another clunker dealing with government secrets, "51" saw the military finally revealing the truth behind America’s most scandalous facility: Area 51. Then one of the inmates escapes and all B movie hell breaks loose. 

  • #51: The Blackout
    51/ Jalor Productions

    #51: The Blackout

    Year released: 2009

    Stacker Score: 23.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.4
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 13%

    2009’s "The Blackout" found the city going dark and the trapped tenants of a building discovering they’re not alone. It’s a premise custom built for spine-tingling thrills, yet somehow the team behind this turkey managed to screw everything up royally.

  • #50: Indestructible Man
    52/ C.G.K. Productions

    #50: Indestructible Man

    Year released: 1956

    Stacker Score: 23.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.8
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 8%

    After getting the electric chair and being subsequently reanimated, Charles “The Butcher” Benton seeks revenge on those who crossed him in the "Indestructible Man." Famous character actor Lon Chaney Jr. played the lead role and spoke no dialogue after an early scene. This vintage pile of cinematic junk was double-billed with the far superior "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" and looked all the worse by comparison.

  • #49: Barb Wire
    53/ Polygram Filmed Entertainment

    #49: Barb Wire

    Year released: 1996

    Stacker Score: 23.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.2
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 14%

    In 1996, Pamela Anderson was America’s most famous bombshell. In "Barb Wire," Anderson played the eponymous role as a club owner in the (then futuristic) year of 2017. The movie earned almost $4 million at the box office.

  • #48: Tentacles
    54/ Gorilla Pictures

    #48: Tentacles

    Year released: 1977

    Stacker Score: 22.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.6
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 9%

    It was larger-than-life actor John Huston versus a larger-than-life mutant octopus in 1977’s "Tentacles." According to legend, the production team dropped loads of cash for a giant prop octopus just to watch it drown at sea on its first day. From a quality perspective, the movie would soon follow suit.

  • #47: Piranha Part Two: The Spawning
    55/ Destination Films

    #47: Piranha Part Two: The Spawning

    Year released: 1981

    Stacker Score: 22.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.5
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 10%

    Nowadays, James Cameron might be one of the most formidable names in Hollywood, but in the early 1980s he was a young Roger Corman protege helming "Piranha Part Two: The Spawning." Well, sort of helming it. Apparently, it was a producer Olivio G. Assonitis who really directed most of the film, something Cameron was all too eager to admit to later on. Meanwhile, when in Rome for the movie’s debut, Cameron dreamed up the idea for "The Terminator." He hasn’t answered to anyone but himself since.

  • #46: Spiders 3D
    56/ Millennium Films

    #46: Spiders 3D

    Year released: 2013

    Stacker Score: 22.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.4
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 11%

    What’s scarier than giant, gruesome spiders presented in stunning 3D? The prospect of sitting through "Spiders 3D" in its entirety, of course. The plodding, low budget flick saw genetically mutated creepy crawlers descending upon New York City. Characters were spared, but the audience wasn’t.

  • #45: Post Impact
    57/ Tandem Productions

    #45: Post Impact

    Year released: 2004

    Stacker Score: 22.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.0
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 15%

    In the vein of "Day After Tomorrow," 2004’s "Post Impact" took place in a modern-day ice age and told the story of survivors looking for a special device that could save humanity. The disaster movie was quite fittingly a disaster, but not for any of the intended reasons. Movies like this make one wonder if mankind is even worth saving.

  • #44: Dragonball: Evolution
    58/ Twentieth Century Fox

    #44: Dragonball: Evolution

    Year released: 2009

    Stacker Score: 22.50
    IMDb User Rating: 2.6
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 19%

    Sometimes movies are supposed to be bad, which helps buffer the blow when they live up to expectation. "Dragonball: Evolution" was not meant to be one of those movies. Based on a popular Japanese manga and subsequent animated series, the film debuted to a massively disappointed fanbase. So terrible was this movie that it prompted the original franchise creator to relaunch the series as an animated film in 2013.

  • #43: Stranded
    59/ Minds Eye Entertainment

    #43: Stranded

    Year released: 2013

    Stacker Score: 22.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.5
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 9%

    Once a heartthrob and respectable actor, Christian Slater found himself "Stranded" in a 2013 film of the same name. The movie was about a team of astronauts who go crazy after a meteor strike infects them with a deadly disease. For those seeking their Christian Slater fix, stick with "Mr. Robot," and if you’re craving alienated astronaut movies, "The Martian" should do you just fine. In other words, "Stranded" is best left behind.

  • #42: The Phantom Planet
    60/ Jupiter Film Productions

    #42: The Phantom Planet

    Year released: 1961

    Stacker Score: 22.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.3
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 11%

    Taking place in the uber-futuristic year of 1980, "The Phantom Planet" from 1961 was the epitome of drive-in schlock. In the movie, an astronaut shrinks down to miniature size after visiting a hostile planet. Equally minute in size are the movie’s ratings among critics and audiences.  

  • #41: Alien Uprising
    61/ Golden Hawk Entertainment

    #41: Alien Uprising

    Year released: 2012

    Stacker Score: 22.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.1
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 13%

    The battle between aliens and humans is basically sci-fi 101, and therefore part of a long-standing cinematic tradition that’s yielded some genuine classics. That’s what makes low-budget turkeys like "Alien Uprising" feel so unnecessary. If you don’t have anything good to say, why say it all?

  • #40: Rollerball
    62/ Atlas Entertainment

    #40: Rollerball

    Year released: 2002

    Stacker Score: 22.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.0
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 14%

    The pointless remake of a gritty 1975 film, 2002’s "Rollerball" centered around a futuristic sport that makes football look like croquet by comparison. Even with reputable director John McTiernan at the helm, the movie was a massive clunker, so bad that star LL Cool J openly said it sucked during a promotion tour.  

  • #39: Breeders
    63/ Beyond Infinity

    #39: Breeders

    Year released: 1986

    Stacker Score: 21.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.5
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 8%

    Riddled with goofs and bad acting, "Breeders" was yet another tale where women get impregnated by an alien entity and begin acting bizarre as a result. It was also yet one more B movie failing to live up to the trippy illustrative box art. Maybe all those illustrators should direct these movies instead.

  • #38: Far Cry
    64/ Boll Kino Beteiligungs GmbH & Co. KG

    #38: Far Cry

    Year released: 2008

    Stacker Score: 21.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.1
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 12%

    Read any list of worst films and the name Uwe Boll will eventually appear. In 2008, the director helmed video game adaptation "Far Cry" with his typical lack of panache and cohesion. That Boll continues to get work is an anomaly. That some of his films make money is a downright travesty.

  • #37: Stasis
    65/ Cinevent

    #37: Stasis

    Year released: 2017

    Stacker Score: 21.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.0
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 13%

    2017 saw its share of decent sci-fi and terrible sci-fi alike. Falling strictly in the latter camp was "Stasis," about a girl who gets her identity stolen by a time traveling fugitive.

  • #36: The Giant Spider Invasion
    66/ ADM Films Department

    #36: The Giant Spider Invasion

    Year released: 1975

    Stacker Score: 21.50
    IMDb User Rating: 2.8
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 15%

    At some point, one must ask him or herself, “Are there any halfway decent spider movies out there aside from 'Arachnophobia'?” 1975’s "The Giant Spider Invasion" would suggest not. That said, lovers of camp should still check it out. After all, it was listed as one of the 100 Most Enjoyably Bad Movies Ever Made by John Wilson, creator of the Golden Raspberry Award.

  • #35: Steel
    67/ 21st Century Film Corporation

    #35: Steel

    Year released: 1997

    Stacker Score: 21.50
    IMDb User Rating: 2.8
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 15%

    People might not remember it, but basketball star Shaquille O’Neal enjoyed a short-lived acting career at the height of his fame. In "Steel," he played a weapons designer whose creations end up in the wrong hands. During production, Shaq was forced to do his own stunts because they couldn’t find a stunt double who matched his height. In spite of all that extra effort, the movie stank big time. Barring future cameos as himself, "Steel" was more or less the end of Shaq’s mainstream acting career, which was probably for the best.

  • #34: Theodore Rex
    68/ Aurora Entertainment

    #34: Theodore Rex

    Year released: 1995

    Stacker Score: 21.50
    IMDb User Rating: 2.4
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 19%

    When it comes to campy midnight movies, no premise is too ridiculous to digest. But when a commercial film drops about Whoopi Goldberg and a talking dinosaur teaming up to fight crime in a futuristic society, some genuine head scratching is practically obliged. In the case of "Theodore Rex," that head scratching came from Goldberg herself, who tried with all her might to get out of her contract to no avail. Expectedly, the film tanked, and Goldberg’s career was never quite the same. 

  • #33: The King of Fighters
    69/ Ram Ltd.

    #33: The King of Fighters

    Year released: 2011

    Stacker Score: 21.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.1
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 11%

    Based on a video game, "The King of Fighters" was about a villain who used powerful artifacts to retain control over an alternate dimension. Meanwhile, viewers wished they could enter an alternate dimension where the film didn’t exist. Needless to say, this was not filmmaking at its finest.

  • #32: Leonard Part 6
    70/ Columbia Pictures

    #32: Leonard Part 6

    Year released: 1987

    Stacker Score: 21.00
    IMDb User Rating: 2.2
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 20%

    In 1987’s "Leonard Part 6," Bill Cosby is employed to stop an evil force that uses brainwashing as its primary tactic. Apparently, Cosby took time off from his hit TV show to star in the film. Given the disastrous results, one inevitably wonders why. The movie swept at the Golden Raspberry awards and was so bad that Cosby ended up buying the TV rights just so it could never be shown on television.

  • #31: It's Alive
    71/ Crystal Sky Worldwide

    #31: It's Alive

    Year released: 2008

    Stacker Score: 20.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.5
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 6%

    Yet another uninspired remake, 2008’s "It’s Alive" served up the tale of a woman who gives birth to a mutant baby. The aggressively terrible film cost $10 million to make, and if you listen closely while watching it, you can hear the sound of that money being flushed down the toilet.

  • #30: Hirokin: The Last Samurai
    72/ Embassy Pictures

    #30: Hirokin: The Last Samurai

    Year released: 2011

    Stacker Score: 20.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.4
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 7%

    It’s said that "Dune" was a huge influence on 2011’s "Hirokin: The Last Samurai," which ultimately makes sense since both films were giant clunkers. The latter was about a reluctant samurai who might have been better off retiring after all, given the movie’s poor reception.

  • #29: Time Chasers
    73/ Edgewood Entertainment

    #29: Time Chasers

    Year released: 1994

    Stacker Score: 20.50
    IMDb User Rating: 2.3
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 18%

    1994’s "Time Chasers"—about an inventor who must stop his time machine from falling into the wrong hands—vicariously prompts viewers to ask themselves what they would do with a time machine. Some might very well say they would go back in time to stop "Time Chasers" from ever getting made. 

  • #28: Rottweiler
    74/ Carmel Productions

    #28: Rottweiler

    Year released: 2005

    Stacker Score: 20.00
    IMDb User Rating: 3.1
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 9%

    Think "Cujo" on steroids and you end up with "Rottweiler," a 2005 film about a cybernetic dog that chases a man across a futuristic, desert terrain. Along with that steroid injection comes a range of side effects, including clunky dialogue, unintentional comedy, redundant chase sequences and shoddy directing.

  • #27: Andron
    75/ Ambi Pictures

    #27: Andron

    Year released: 2016

    Stacker Score: 20.00
    IMDb User Rating: 2.7
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 13%

    Based on an Italian TV series, "Andron" entered the cinematic stratosphere in 2016 and landed with a colossal thud. A wannabe clone of franchises like "Hunger Games" or "Maze Runner" (or even cult horror film "Cube"), the movie told the story of a group of people trapped in a maze. Wearing its low budget on its sleeve, the film fell far short of its derivative ambitions to say the least. 

  • #26: Mega Shark vs. Mecha Shark
    76/ Denholm Trading Inc.

    #26: Mega Shark vs. Mecha Shark

    Year released: 2014

    Stacker Score: 20.00
    IMDb User Rating: 2.6
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 14%

    As the third in a line of related films, "Mega Shark vs Mecha Shark" was an intentionally cheesy effort that only appealed to those with a high tolerance for bad CGI and extreme camp. Unafraid to poke fun at itself, the movie even featured a scene where a character literally “jumps the shark.” It all went down in the midst of "Sharknado" mania and likely reaped far more money than it deserved as a result.

  • #25: Superbabies: Baby Geniuses 2
    77/ ApolloMedia Distribution

    #25: Superbabies: Baby Geniuses 2

    Year released: 2004

    Stacker Score: 20.00
    IMDb User Rating: 2.0
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 20%

    The hyper-intelligent baby geniuses were back in "Superbabies: Baby Geniuses 2." Also back was director Bob Clark, who apparently had no qualms tarnishing his legacy one bout of “baby talk” at a time. Among the sequel’s ongoing achievements is the inclusion on virtually every “worst film ever” list the internet can muster.

  • #24: Warrior of the Lost World
    78/ Lastlink Films Production

    #24: Warrior of the Lost World

    Year released: 1985

    Stacker Score: 19.50
    IMDb User Rating: 2.3
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 16%

    In a testament to the power of bold incompetence, "Warrior of the Lost World" director David Worth was sent to Italy and asked to make a film after being shown a poster image and no script. The result was a weak "Mad Max" rip off with a mercenary on a motorcycle bringing down an evil government. That was, after all, what was shown on the poster.

  • #23: Sand Sharks
    79/ Little Dragon Productions

    #23: Sand Sharks

    Year released: 2011

    Stacker Score: 19.00
    IMDb User Rating: 2.6
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 12%

    The shark craze continues, this time with "Sand Shark." Some sharks can swim, others can fly through the air, and this one plows through the sand. You already know exactly what to expect.

  • #22: Laserblast
    80/ Ice Cold Productions

    #22: Laserblast

    Year released: 1977

    Stacker Score: 19.00
    IMDb User Rating: 2.5
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 13%

    After finding an alien weapon, a lonely teenager becomes a horrific killer on a murder spree in 1977’s "Laserblast." Lovers of obscure, terrible sci-fi should check it out. All others should avoid at all costs.

  • #21: 40 Days and Nights
    81/ Suzanne DeLaurentiis Production

    #21: 40 Days and Nights

    Year released: 2012

    Stacker Score: 19.00
    IMDb User Rating: 2.4
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 14%

    Yet another entry that puts the “disaster” in disaster movie, "40 Days and Nights" was a modern-day take on Noah’s Ark. Specifically, the movie was about a series of catastrophic tsunamis threatening the end of civilization. In response, the military builds an ark with room for only 50,000 people. It was a survival of the fittest tale ironically captured by a movie not fit enough for Redbox.

  • #20: Age of Dinosaurs
    82/ The Asylum

    #20: Age of Dinosaurs

    Year released: 2013

    Stacker Score: 18.50
    IMDb User Rating: 2.9
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 8%

    There must be a void that needs to be filled after one watches the "Jurassic Park" movies over two hundred times. It’s the only plausible explanation for utterly inadequate fare like 2013’s "Age of Dinosaurs." Expect bad CGI, bad writing, bad acting, bad everything. 

  • #19: Zaat
    83/ Barton Films

    #19: Zaat

    Year released: 1975

    Stacker Score: 18.00
    IMDb User Rating: 2.5
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 11%

    The story behind making 1971 aquatic monster movie "Zaat" is far more legendary than anything that went down on screen. Perhaps the most notable mishap occurred when an actor was accidentally bitten by a live snake on screen. Naturally, the director kept the cameras rolling and incorporated the unscripted snake bite into the movie. Meanwhile, the budget was so low on this clunker that they used car headlights at night because they couldn’t afford proper lighting.

  • #18: Lawnmower Man 2: Beyond Cyberspace
    84/ New Line Cinema

    #18: Lawnmower Man 2: Beyond Cyberspace

    Year released: 1996

    Stacker Score: 18.00
    IMDb User Rating: 2.4
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 12%

    Loosely based on a short story by Stephen King, the original "Lawnmower Man" was an uneven but ultimately prescient film about the dangers of technology. "Lawnmower Man 2: Beyond Cyberspace," on the other hand, was so shockingly inept that its faults overshadowed any sense of thematic urgency. The movie saw digital demon Jobe trying to connect all the computers in the world into one network, a premise that certainly sounds timely enough even by today’s standards. Unfortunately, it was pure amateur hour behind the scenes, and the only warning shots fired were on the dangers of bad filmmaking.

  • #17: King of the Lost World
    85/ The Asylum

    #17: King of the Lost World

    Year released: 2005

    Stacker Score: 18.00
    IMDb User Rating: 2.3
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 13%

    Look to the credits for virtually every terrible film from the last two decades, and you’ll see one production company pop up over and over again: The Asylum. Not only was the schlock factory responsible for the popular "Sharknado" franchise, but they’re behind a number of films on this very list. It’s therefore no surprise to discover that The Asylum produced 2005’s "King of the Lost World," a "King Kong" knock-off that skirts around its own derivation by going straight to the source. That is, the movie takes its name from "The Lost World," a story by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle that apparently inspired a slew of monster island movies in its wake. Hence, "King of the Lost World" scores one point for doing its homework and then fails miserably on every other front.

  • #16: Dracula 3000
    86/ Film Afrika Worldwide

    #16: Dracula 3000

    Year released: 2004

    Stacker Score: 18.00
    IMDb User Rating: 2.1
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 15%

    Combining sci-fi and horror with impeccable incompetence, 2005’s "Dracula 3000" saw the world’s favorite bloodsucker boarding a spaceship and terrorizing the crew. The movie starred B movie mainstay Casper Van Dien along with former Playboy playmate Erika Eleniak and former rapper Coolio. On a positive note, by spanning different genres and stealing from different franchises, this turkey was able to offend a much wider variety of movie lovers with its sheer terribleness.

  • #15: The Rig
    87/ OffSpring Productions

    #15: The Rig

    Year released: 2010

    Stacker Score: 17.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.2
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 3%

    The crew of an offshore drilling rig take on a vicious sea creature in 2010’s "The Rig." Given the isolated setting and poignant themes of man vs nature, there could very well be a similar movie in a parallel dimension that’s not as bad. Our dimension, however, got stuck with 94 minutes of low-budget dreck.

  • #14: Alien from L.A.
    88/ After Dark Films

    #14: Alien from L.A.

    Year released: 1988

    Stacker Score: 17.50
    IMDb User Rating: 3.1
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 4%

    Starring then newcomer Kathy Ireland and directed by Albert Pyun, 1988’s "Alien from L.A." was about a young girl who wanders upon an underground civilization. With a story inspired by Jules Verne, and some music lifted straight out of "Star Wars," the movie exuded a special touch of extra derivation.

  • #13: .com for Murder
    89/ Starway Pictures

    #13: .com for Murder

    Year released: 2002

    Stacker Score: 17.50
    IMDb User Rating: 2.7
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 8%

    Touting the tagline “In Cyberspace No One Can Hear You Scream,” and making overt nods to Hitchcock’s "Dial M for Murder," 2002’s ".com for Murder" clearly wasn’t aiming to score originality points. Similarly, the premise—which entailed a girl accidentally contacting a killer through the internet—was worthy of Lifetime Channel at best.

  • #12: Battlefield Earth
    90/ C.G.K. Productions

    #12: Battlefield Earth

    Year released: 2000

    Stacker Score: 17.50
    IMDb User Rating: 2.4
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 11%

    Possibly the world’s most expensive recruiting video, "Battlefield Earth" was a fiasco of epic proportion upon its release in 2000. Produced by and starring John Travolta—who was in the midst of a career resurgence at the time—the movie simply butchered the source material. As a result, it retains iconic status as one of the biggest budget turkeys of all time.

  • #11: Alone in the Dark
    91/ Polygram Filmed Entertainment

    #11: Alone in the Dark

    Year released: 2005

    Stacker Score: 16.50
    IMDb User Rating: 2.3
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 10%

    No list of terrible movies would be complete without at least two appearances by Uwe Boll. In 2005, he directed "Alone in the Dark," yet another video game-based film executed with a total lack of logic and finesse. It was named the “worst film of 2005” by the Bad Stinkers Movie Awards and hasn’t improved in reputation since.

  • #10: Hobgoblins
    92/ Rick Sloane Productions

    #10: Hobgoblins

    Year released: 1988

    Stacker Score: 16.50
    IMDb User Rating: 2.3
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 10%

    Made for a shockingly low (estimated) $15,000, 1988’s "Hobgoblins" was a pure example of guerilla filmmaking at its worst. The movie was about a group of aliens who enacted your fantasies and then killed you in the process, which could have been intriguing if not for the aforementioned budget issues. Meanwhile, all the scenes were shot without permits, obvious toy guns were used as stand-ins for real guns, and the director hired a just-released mental patient to operate the hobgoblin puppets

  • #9: The Beast of Yucca Flats
    93/ Cardoza-Francis Productions

    #9: The Beast of Yucca Flats

    Year released: 1961

    Stacker Score: 15.50
    IMDb User Rating: 2.4
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 7%

    If you’ve come this far along on the list, then you know all too well that a genetic mutation gone awry commonly makes for classically campy moviegoing. Infusing that premise with some authentic Cold War paranoia was 1961’s "The Beast of Yucca Flats," which saw a defected Soviet scientist turning into a radioactive monster, and rocked the tagline “Commies Made Him an Atomic Mutant!” Among the film’s many foibles was that it was shot without sound, forcing many of the actors to speak while facing away from the camera.

  • #8: Avalanche Sharks
    94/ Esse Ci Cinematografica

    #8: Avalanche Sharks

    Year released: 2013

    Stacker Score: 15.50
    IMDb User Rating: 2.3
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 8%

    If sharks coming out of the sand wasn’t quite preposterous enough for you, then by all means stream 2013’s "Avalanche Sharks" at your earliest convenience. In the movie, a bikini contest turns into bloody mayhem after a nearby avalanche unleashes a bunch of giant, frozen sharks.

  • #7: 500 MPH Storm
    95/ Indy Entertainment / The Asylum

    #7: 500 MPH Storm

    Year released: 2013

    Stacker Score: 15.50
    IMDb User Rating: 2.2
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 9%

    Casper Van Dien is back and ready for more low-budget action in 2013’s "500 MPH Storm." This time around, killer hurricanes are on the loose and Dien must get his family to a secure location before the hurricanes unite to form a “hypercane.” It’s an 86-minute whirlwind of bad CGI and cringe-worthy dialogue and ranks as one of the worst movies ever made.

  • #6: Space Mutiny
    96/ Brouwersgracht Investments

    #6: Space Mutiny

    Year released: 1988

    Stacker Score: 15.50
    IMDb User Rating: 2.0
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 11%

    It’s probably a good thing that "Space Mutiny" exists, if only because it made for such a great episode of "Mystery Science Theater 3000." Put simply, the movie is an absolute symphony of low budget cheese. All the space footage was literally stolen from the 1978 TV series, "Battlestar Galactica." The movie was in fact so bad that both men who helped direct it didn’t want their real names attached.

  • #5: 100 Degrees Below Zero
    97/ The Asylum

    #5: 100 Degrees Below Zero

    Year released: 2013

    Stacker Score: 15.00
    IMDb User Rating: 2.4
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 6%

    "100 Degrees Below Zero" was a 2013 disaster flick about an ash cloud plummeting the earth into a deathly ice age. However, it was primarily the shoddy execution that left audiences feeling cold. As with so many recent clunkers, we have production studio The Asylum to thank for this one.

  • #4: Monster a-Go Go
    98/ B.I. & L. Releasing Corp.

    #4: Monster a-Go Go

    Year released: 1965

    Stacker Score: 14.00
    IMDb User Rating: 2.3
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 5%

    1965’s "Monster a-Go Go"—about a creature from space who assumes the identity of an astronaut—actually began filming in 1961 with Bill Rebane in the director’s chair. About halfway through filming, Rebane ran out of money and was thereby forced to shut down production. Years later, a different director named Herschell Gordon Lewis bought Rebane’s footage and ended up finishing the movie. However, because Lewis was unable to secure a number of the original actors for the extra shoots, many of the characters simply vanish in the middle of the film itself. Suffice to say, that’s certainly one way to end up with one of the worst movies ever made.

  • #3: Apocalypse Z
    99/ Millennium Films

    #3: Apocalypse Z

    Year released: 2013

    Stacker Score: 13.50
    IMDb User Rating: 2.3
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 4%

    The wheel of bad sci-fi and horror tropes landed on “zombie outbreak,” and "Apocalypse Z" was born as a result. Originally called "Zombie Massacre," the movie’s title was changed after the success of the similarly themed but far more successful "World War Z." It just goes to show how little respect the "Apocalypse Z" filmmakers had for the intelligence of their audience, as if that wasn’t made clear by the movie itself.

  • #2: The Wild World of Batwoman
    100/ Tandem Productions

    #2: The Wild World of Batwoman

    Year released: 1966

    Stacker Score: 13.00
    IMDb User Rating: 2.1
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 5%

    In the mid-1960s, a strip club was raided by the police, and the strippers who danced there suddenly found themselves out of work. A casting director happened to be in the area, and he offered the strippers acting jobs in an upcoming film. And that there is the story behind "The Wild World of Batwoman." The movie—which had little do with superheroines and was made without DC’s consent—would end up being sued for copyright infringement, and re-released under the title "She Was a Hippy Vampire." By 1988, the original title was restored, and the movie itself has since secured its place as one of the worst films of all time.

  • #1: Attack of the Jurassic Shark
    101/ Twentieth Century Fox

    #1: Attack of the Jurassic Shark

    Year released: 2013

    Stacker Score: 9.50
    IMDb User Rating: 1.5
    Rotten Tomatoes Audience Score: 4%

    Swallowing the #1 spot whole is 2013’s "Attack of the Jurassic Shark." It followed the adventures of a prehistoric mega-shark unfrozen by an oil rig company. The film was a particularly unpalatable entry in the killer CGI shark genre, and takes the title of worst sci-fi movie ever made. Watch it if you must, but prepare to feel really dirty afterward.

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