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Least obedient dog breeds

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Sundays Photography // Shutterstock

Least obedient dog breeds

When it comes to obedience, a variety of factors can affect a dog's disposition. Training quality and duration, environmental factors, and the individual puppy personalities are all major contributors—but how much can a dog's breed and genetic makeup come into play?

In 1994, neuropsychological researcher Stanley Coren sought to compile the definitive resource for understanding the inner workings of our canine companions, captured within his book, “The Intelligence of Dogs.” Coren's research was based on extensive surveys of 208 obedience judges from the American and Canadian Kennel Clubs, representing half of all judges in North America. According to Professor Coren, 51% of a dog's intelligence stems from its genes while 49% is based on environmental circumstances. Coren ultimately collected statistically significant data for 140 recognized dog breeds, ranking them by their working and obedience intelligence. This form of canine intelligence represents a breed's ability to learn and respond to commands and training, described by Coren as a "measure of what the dog can do for humans." 

Drawing from Coren's research, Stacker has compiled the breeds that ranked in the lowest half of working and obedience intelligence. Each breed is broken down by their estimated understanding of new commands and ability to obey a known command the first time while adding in details on their trainability and history as a breed. Coren's research evaluated the animal's problem-solving capabilities, obedience, memory, social training, and powers of observation.

Read on to see why not all retrievers are created equal in trainability, and why you can’t write off lapdogs when it comes to their guard dog abilities.

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Max Pixel

#40. Soft coated Wheaten terrier (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

Originally bred as an Irish hunting dog, the soft coated Wheaten terrier has been described as “an iron fist in a velvet glove” for their muscular body sheathed in a soft coat.

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Grigorita Ko // Shutterstock

#40. Bedlington terrier (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

Bedlington terriers, named for a small town in Northern England, share both the general physical makeup and the temperament of a sheep. They boast a thick white coat and their bodily structure makes them capable of galloping at exceptionally fast speeds.

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Pixabay

#40. Smooth fox terrier (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

Fox terriers are easily distinguishable from the stark contrast between the colorful coats, which cover their head, and the white coats that typically cover most of the rest of their bodies. Unlike their close relatives in the wire fox terrier, this breed has more of an angular, V-shaped head.

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Naturialae // Wikimedia Commons

#39. Curly coated retriever (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

The curly coated retriever was originally bred in England for fetching waterfowl. It is important for owners of this breed to incorporate fun into the training process to keep the dog’s attention.

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Airwolfhound // Flickr

#39. Irish wolfhound (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

The Irish wolfhound is the tallest of all breeds officially recognized by the American Kennel Club, and while they stand 30 inches at a minimum, they are gentle giants. The Irish wolfhound is known to be one of the most caring and faithful dog breeds.

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Erdelyi Kopo // Wikimedia Commons

#38. Kuvasz (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

Hungary’s beautiful Kuvasz breed resembles American favorites such as the Labrador retriever and golden retriever, though the working dog distinguishes itself through a unique snow-white coat. During his reign in the mid-15th century, King Matthias I of Hungary trusted his "Kuvs" more than his actual palace guards, which speaks to their loyal nature.

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Ted Van Pelt // Flickr

#38. Australian shepherd (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

The Australian shepherd is a high-energy breed with a relatively unknown origin story prior to its appearance in the U.S. Known for its territorial and protective nature, this breed requires careful and active training.

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r. // Wikimedia Commons

#37. Saluki (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

With origins in the Middle East, Salukis resemble greyhounds and are the second-fastest dog breeds in the world.

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Finnish Spitz // Wikimedia Commons

#37. Finnish spitz (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

Finnish spitzs, also known affectionately as Finkies, are amongst the loudest, most vocal canines around the world, and while this may be unfavorable to the casual dog lover, fanatics take great pride in these dogs’ noises. In Finland, owners congregate to determine whose Finkie is to be anointed “King Barker,” the dog responsible for the best yodeling.

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Anne Hornyak // Wikimedia Commons

#37. Pointer (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

The etymology of the “pointer” is fairly self-evident. These runners’ companions assume a directional standing position, which is especially useful for hunters looking to locate game birds.

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tanakawho // Wikimedia Commons

#36. King Charles spaniel (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

These short, hairy spaniels with big, beady eyes were especially popular amongst 17th-century British monarchs Charles I and Charles II, and the breed was named in the latter’s honor as such. The breed comes in four distinct coat colors, each of which is known for an association with one royal family or another: Blenheim (chestnut and white), black and tan, ruby, and tricolor.

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Drazen Boskic PHOTO // Shutterstock

#36. German wirehaired pointer (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

The German wirehaired pointer greatly resembles the standard pointer in that the two share a comparable build and the same iconic directional stance. They differ in coat, however, since the German wirehaired pointer boasts a homogenous mix of gray and brown hairs across its body, along with a brown head, with golden snout hairs resembling a lion’s mane.

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WilleeCole Photography // Shutterstock

#36. Black and tan coonhound (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

The first coonhound breed recognized by the American Kennel Club back in 1945, the black and tan is recognizable anywhere because of its beautifully transitioning coat as well as its long, droopy ears.

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Steve Bruckmann // Shutterstock

#36. American water spaniel (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

A relatively smaller breed, weighing anywhere between 25 to 45 pounds, and measuring anywhere between 15 to 18 inches tall, the American water spaniel hails from the Great Lakes region. Its soft brown fur and curly-haired ears make it exceedingly unique, especially considering this rare breed is only about 3,000 strong today.

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Sue and Marty // Wikimedia Commons

#35. Siberian husky (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

Coming in various coats and sizes, the Siberian husky is the pride of the Tundra, as the nimble-footed dog serves both as a productive worker and a loyal companion. The breed first gained notoriety in the early 1900s when they began dominating sled races and is today the 12th most popular breed in America.

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Heike Andres // Wikimedia Commons

#35. Bichon Frise (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

This breed first gained popularity amongst European royalty in the 13th century in the likes of Italy, France, and Spain, and it's easy to see why. The Bichon Frise’s small frame, bright white coat, and bouncy walking style make it a veritable puffball with legs.

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Ladykransteer // Wikimedia Commons

#34. Tibetan spaniel (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

This breed was originally bred to keep watch on the walls of Tibetan monasteries since their excellent vision allowed them to see exceedingly long distances. Ironically enough, though, it is now fairly difficult for the casual owner to get a Tibbie to stand still, as the breed is amongst the bouncier and more energetic of the spaniels.

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Derek Hunter // Shutterstock

#34. English foxhound (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

English foxhounds are not too physically different from their cousins across the pond, and it may be difficult to distinguish them at first glance. American foxhounds boast a typically darker, more pronounced coat at different parts of their body while their English counterparts are also marginally taller.

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Lourdes Photography // Shutterstock

#34. Otterhound (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

This cheerful, energetic breed combines webbed feet, a strong build, and a razor-sharp sense of smell to serve as a great hunting dog.

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Diogo Ramos Martins // Shutterstock

#34. American foxhound (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

American foxhounds typically have a black, white, and tan coat. American foxhounds love room to run around in and typically have high energy, though they’re also gentle, and get along well with children and other animals.

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christina // Wikimedia Commons

#34. Greyhound (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

Capable of running over 40 miles per hour, greyhounds are slim and athletic with long legs and a short, aerodynamic coat. However, they were bred for sprinting, not endurance; greyhounds sleep around 18 hours a day.

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Pets Adviser // Wikimedia Commons

#34. Wirehaired pointing griffon (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

Popular both as a show dog and a gun dog meant to assist hunters in retrieving game, the wirehaired pointing griffon is relatively rare in the United States.

 

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Christopher Walker // Wikimedia Commons

#33. West Highland white terrier (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

Westies are more than 300 years old as a breed and have become increasingly popular in the United States. Now the 42nd most popular breed overall, they rank only behind Yorkies and Bostons amongst all terrier breeds, which likely has to do with their small frame and thick white coat.

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Andrea Arden // Flickr

#33. Scottish deerhound (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

Larger in size than the greyhound, the Scottish deerhound is docile and friendly, and prefers a lot of exercise in large, open areas. A Scottish deerhound named Cleod was featured in two Harry Potter movies as the animagus, or animal form, of Sirius Black.

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Max Pixel

#32. Boxer (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

Boxers are well celebrated by the AKC and have won Best in Show at Westminster four times: in 1947, 1949, 1951, and 1970. Training can pay off, but trainers need to be patient and consistent—this intelligent breed invents their own form of obedience.

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Rytis Mikelskas // Wikimedia Commons

#32. Great Dane (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

Great Danes are docile and great for families, as long as they’re trained early. The tallest dog ever recorded was a Great Dane named Zeus, who was 44 inches tall—nearly four feet—from paw to shoulder.

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Pixabay

#31. Dachshund (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

With a deep-rooted German heritage, these short, furry "wiener dogs" are a fan favorite in the United States, coming in as the 13th most popular breed. Because of the dachshund’s peculiar frame, it is important that owners do not overfeed them or they could run the risk of subjecting their dog to a herniated or slipped disc.

 

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Melounix // Shutterstock

#31. Staffordshire bull terrier (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

Staffordshire bull terriers were once famous fighters, struggling for victory in England’s baiting rings. The breed has been transformed to be kind and patient, but the AKC still recommends that young Staffies be integrated with other dogs early to develop a more easy-going nature.

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Continentaleurope // Wikimedia Commons

#30. Alaskan malamute

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

Alaskan malamutes were originally bred to be sled dogs. They are pack animals that require their owners to establish themselves as head of the household through early training.

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Matt Brown // Flickr

#29. Whippet (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

Whippets were originally bred to hunt rabbits and other small animals. Today, whippets are skilled with agility-based tasks—they also make great therapy dogs.

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David Raihelgauz // Shutterstock

#29. Chinese shar pei (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

If you want a guard dog that will remain calm most of the time, but spring to attention in the face of danger, a Chinese shar pei is a good fit. These dogs have broad muzzles surrounded by folds of loose skin around their heads, necks, and shoulders; the name “shar pei” translates to “sand skin.”

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Walker Whited // Wikimedia Commons

#29. Wire fox terrier (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

Wire fox terriers (or “wires”) have a history in British fox hunts: This dog’s job was to scare foxes out of their shelters so that hounds and hunters could chase them out in the open. There have been many famous wires throughout history, from Caesar, King Edward VII’s favorite dog, to Asta, the co-star of William Powell and Myrna Loy’s “Thin Man” movies. The breed is often seen on screen today.

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Max Pixel

#28. Rhodesian ridgeback

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

As a proud home protector and aggressive hunter, the Rhodesian ridgeback has a history of hunting big game in centuries past. Although they’re known for their friendliness, the breed can be a bit stubborn at times.

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Dannydulai // Wikimedia Commons

#27. Ibizan hound (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

Much like partygoers on the Spanish island for which the breed is named, Ibizan hounds simply cannot sit still. The tall, skinny canines are world-class athletes, known for their outstanding leaping and sprinting ability.

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Shleiderbmx // Wikimedia Commons

#27. Welsh terrier (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

Welsh terriers, like Lakeland terriers, fox terriers, and many other modern British breeds, are descendants from an ancient breed called the Old English black and tan terrier. The Welsh terrier is distinguished as a bit calmer than its relatives, but still up for a challenge; this dog was bred to fight badgers, otters, and other feisty game.

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Sini Merikallio // Wikimedia Commons

#27. Irish terrier (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

Known as the “Daredevil of the Emerald Isle,” Irish terriers are famously fiery both in coat color and temperament. These dogs have been farm dogs, watch dogs, hunting dogs, and family guardians, when their aggression is kept in check.

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Gdegezelle // Wikimedia Commons

#26. Boston terrier (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

These friendly dogs are defined by their striking "tuxedo jacket" coat. From an obedience perspective, trainability can be a challenge given their energetic nature and occasional barking issues. This breed is a cross between the white English terrier and the English bulldog.

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Biser Yanev // Wikimedia Commons

#26. Akita (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 25 to 40 repetitions
- Obey first command: 50% of the time or better

Akitas were bred in the Akita Prefecture of northern Japan in the early 17th century and have been held in high regard in the nation ever since as powerful, loyal guard dogs. One famous Akita named Hachiko went to the Shibuya Train Station every morning for 10 years, waiting for the return of his owner who had passed away. Today, Hachiko is the subject of two movies (a Japanese film and a Hollywood adaptation), and has a statue built in his likeness outside the train station he visited.

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Michal Manas // Wikimedia Commons

#25. Skye terrier

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

The Skye Terrier can be considered courageous and well-tempered, yet canny. They are also reserved and cautious with strangers.

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Flickr User // Wikimedia Commons

#24. Norfolk terrier (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

The Norfolk terrier can be reserved around new people. However, the breed can coexist better with other pets better than some terriers.

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Ionwind // Wikimedia Commons

#24. Sealyham terrier (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

The Sealyham terrier has a reputation as a “bruiser” among short-legged terriers; they’re small but they pack a big bark. When well-trained, however, these dogs are entertaining and affectionate, and are commonly used as therapy dogs.

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Max Pixel

#23. Pug

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

The pug is one of the world’s oldest breeds, dating back to when they were used as hunting dogs during the Han Dynasty. With their experience as hunting dogs, they like to become the boss if their owners allow it.

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PxHere

#22. French bulldog

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

A generally active breed, French bulldogs are alert and playful without being unruly. French bulldogs typically sport an even-keeled disposition.

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Ger Dekker // Flickr

#21. Griffon Bruxellois (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

Hailing from the streets of Brussels, Belgium, this breed of griffon is fun and affectionate, but the dogs are prone to being moody and constantly crave attention, which can be a challenge for houses filled with young children.

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Ron Clausen // Wikimedia Commons

#21. Maltese (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

Maltese make hardy pets that are ready to alert of any intruders. They are adaptable and shine on the agility course.

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Trojan_Llama // Flickr

#20. Italian greyhound

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

Oftentimes oblivious of their toy size, Italian greyhounds may need to be protected against larger dogs, mischievous children, and their own curiosity. They can pose a challenge to housetraining given their active nature.

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Sherri Cavalier // Flickr

#19. Chinese crested

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

With exposed skin, Chinese cresteds will need canine clothes and human sunblock in the summer. Cresteds tend to like children, but they’re far too small to accommodate rough-housing, and they can be one of the most difficult breeds to house train.

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Wikimedia Commons

#18. Dandie Dinmont terrier (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

Dandies are small, love to hunt, and are affectionate toward people they become familiar with. Even though they do not require as much exercise and attention as other dogs, Dandies quickly become bored with repetitive tasks and will need to have diverse training sessions.

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eye-blink // Shutterstock

#18. Petit basset griffon Vendéen (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

A small hound breed originating in France, the PBGV was used to hunt small animals in rocky terrain, which led the breed to develop superior intelligence, a keen sense of smell, and agile physical strength.

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Davor Cengija // Flickr

#18. Tibetan terrier (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

Contrary to their name, Tibetan terriers are not an actual terrier breed, but have been called that due to similarities in size. These dogs are energetic, intelligent, and independent, which can be a tricky combination for trainers to work with, but rewarding with the right amount of patience.

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skeeze // Pixabay

#18. Japanese Chin (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

Known historically for being bred as companions to Japanese royals and other aristocrats, the small and playful Chin dogs are best trained through positive reinforcement and fun activities that help them learn new tricks.

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Pixabay

#18. Lakeland terrier (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

Known best for their uniquely hairy, cylindrical snout, Lakeland terriers stand at about 14 to 15 inches and weigh approximately 17 pounds when fully grown. The breed is named for its origin in the Lake Region in the north of England, where it was originally used to ward off foxes that threatened sheep herds.

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David Martyn Hunt // Flickr

#17. Old English sheepdog

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

Old English sheepdogs have a tendency to bark and howl. They also have a relatively large need for exercise.

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HeartSpoon // Wikimedia Commons

#16. Great Pyrenees

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

Great Pyrenees make skilled protectors. These large dogs can jump into action at the drop of a dime to protect their owners.

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Kelly Hunter // Flickr

#15. Scottish terrier (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

A popular breed of the 1930s and 1940s, Scotties were bred as watchdogs and farm helpers, so they are used to being independent and aloof. They carry themselves with confidence and dignity, and respond well to different vocal cues.

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vlaaitje // Pixabay

#15. Saint Bernard (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

While Saint Bernards can make great companions, be prepared to deal with temperament issues. Saint Bernards can demand a decent amount of training.

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Lilly M // Wikimedia Commons

#14. Bull terrier

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

Bull terriers were originally developed as a fighting breed. With a little extra attention to discipline, a few minutes a day of training can have positive results.

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Pixabay

#13. Chihuahua

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

Rarely growing taller than 8 inches or larger than 6 pounds, it’s no surprise that Chihuahuas have become known affectionately as “purse dogs.” While the breed originally hailing from Mexico requires a lot of physical activity, it can typically get more than sufficient exercise in a small space because of its slender frame.

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SubertT // Shutterstock

#12. Lhasa Apso

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

Originally bred in Tibet to be a defender, the Lhasa Apso's peculiar appearance and demeanor can be a fright to people walking through the front door. One must consider their protective nature prior to choosing one as a family pet.

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Corpusdigitalis // Wikimedia Commons

#11. Bullmastiff

- Understanding of new commands: 40 to 80 repetitions
- Obey first command: 30% of the time or better

Known to be independent thinkers, bullmastiffs make good family pets if trained consistently. However, they top out at 130 pounds of mostly muscle and can be aggressive.

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Robert Nunnally // Flickr

#10. Shih Tzu

- Understanding of new commands: 80 to 100 repetitions or more
- Obey first command: 25% of the time or worse

The 20th most popular dog breed in America, Shih Tzus are wonderfully cute companions that stick around for quite some time, with the typical lifespan ranging from 10 to 18 years. Shih Tzus have a strongly rooted historical association with royalty, as they were the preferred lapdog of multiple Chinese emperors.

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Coco Toledo // Flickr

#9. Basset hound

- Understanding of new commands: 80 to 100 repetitions or more
- Obey first command: 25% of the time or worse

The basset hound has an extremely strong sense of smell, trailing only the coonhound in following ability. They do not prefer to be alone for long periods of time, and can become destructive if left on their own for too long.

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Pixabay

#8. Mastiff (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 80 to 100 repetitions or more
- Obey first command: 25% of the time or worse

Mastiffs stand out due to their large size, as they are one of the heaviest dog breeds out there. A mastiff dog is usually calm and loving to its family, as long as you can get past its stubbornness during training sessions.

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Ruth Ellison // Wikimedia Commons

#8. Beagle (tie)

- Understanding of new commands: 80 to 100 repetitions or more
- Obey first command: 25% of the time or worse

While beagles are popular pets today, the breed was originally developed with the intention of pack hunting. While nobody knows the exact origin of the breed name, historians hypothesize that it derives from “be’geule,” the French word for the noise they make while hunting.

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Dirk // Wikimedia Commons

#7. Pekingese

- Understanding of new commands: 80 to 100 repetitions or more
- Obey first command: 25% of the time or worse

Pekingese are known to be independent, stubborn, and difficult to train. This breed can also be considered aloof with strangers.

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Pixabay

#6. Bloodhound

- Understanding of new commands: 80 to 100 repetitions or more
- Obey first command: 25% of the time or worse

Bloodhounds are known to be “sleuth seekers” and can be interested in wherever the nose takes them; this can pose an issue with obedience training.

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Taru T Torpstram // Wikimedia Commons

#5. Borzoi

- Understanding of new commands: 80 to 100 repetitions or more
- Obey first command: 25% of the time or worse

While Borzois were bred to chase game, this behavior can be avoided with early obedience training. Also, early training helps the Borzoi with being around all types of people and animals.

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Llima Orosa // Flickr

#4. Chow Chow

- Understanding of new commands: 80 to 100 repetitions or more
- Obey first command: 25% of the time or worse

Chow Chows are intensely loyal, but can be stubborn. They need repetition, early and often.

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Ajith Kumar // Flickr

#3. Bulldog

- Understanding of new commands: 80 to 100 repetitions or more
- Obey first command: 25% of the time or worse

Bulldogs can also benefit from early socialization and training. They are constant chewers and like playing tug-of-war. Early discipline encourages learning when this game is appropriate.

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fugzu // Wikimedia Commons

#2. Basenji

- Understanding of new commands: 80 to 100 repetitions or more
- Obey first command: 25% of the time or worse

Basenjis will do what they want, when they want. They are ferocious chewers—anything left on the floor is fair game.

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VirtualWolf // Flickr

#1. Afghan hound

- Understanding of new commands: 80 to 100 repetitions or more
- Obey first command: 25% of the time or worse

The Afghan hound has an independent streak, and this mentality translates to being difficult to train. They were originally groomed as predators, and can continue that tendency through maturity.

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