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The Republican and Democratic parties in numbers

  • Understanding the Republican and Democratic parties by the numbers
    1/ Kyle James // Flickr

    Understanding the Republican and Democratic parties by the numbers

    News organizations frequently publish profiles on “the American voter,” from Trump-supporting farmers in Nebraska to Democratic backers in Miami. The individual narratives are telling, but there’s also plenty of data on the bigger picture of American voters to consider. Among all registered voters, 50% support the Democratic party and 42% support the Republican party. The livelihoods, beliefs, and ages of those voters vary greatly, and once topics like religion are considered, the gap grows wider.

    How do both parties view climate change? Which party does Generation X side with? Compiling polls, studies, and reports from the Pew Research Center, Gallup, and E-Poll Market Research, Stacker created a comprehensive list of where Democrat and Republican voters stand on these and other major issues. Read on to see which issues most strongly divide Democrats and Republicans, and learn the one measure on gun regulation both parties overwhelmingly support in equal measures.

    RELATED: Click here to see political podcasts you should listen to across the ideological spectrum.

  • Breakdown by gender — Democrats
    2/ Steven Braeger // Wikimedia Commons

    Breakdown by gender — Democrats

    Men who identify or lean toward Democrat: 44%

    Women who identify or lean toward Democrat: 56%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    According to the Pew Research Center, the party with which American men and women identify has not changed significantly over recent decades. 56% of women identify or lean Democrat, while 44% of men do.

  • Breakdown by gender — Republicans
    3/ Republican Party (United States) // Wikimedia Commons

    Breakdown by gender — Republicans

    Men who identify or lean toward Republican: 48%

    Women who identify or lean toward Republican: 37%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    37% of women fall into this category, along with 48% of men. According to Pew, the gap between men’s and women’s preferred party is the widest it has ever been.

  • By state — Democrats
    4/ MA cities towns.svg: Sswonk // Wikimedia Commons

    By state — Democrats

    Most Democratic states:

    1. Massachusetts: 57% Democratic, 26% Republican

    2. Maryland: 56% Democratic, 28% Republican

    3. New York: 52% Democratic, 29% Republican

    4. Vermont: 52% Democratic, 30% Republican

    5. Hawaii: 50% Democratic, 28% Republican

    Source: Gallup

    There are more Democratic-supporting states than Republican-supporting ones for the first time in three years, according to a Gallup poll. The 2017 poll asked state residents to self-report their party preference. Democrats won the majority of support in 19 states, including the highest totals in Massachusetts, Maryland, New York, Vermont, and Hawaii.

  • By state — Republicans
    5/ Magog the Ogre // Wikimedia Commons

    By state — Republicans

    Most Republican states:

    1. Wyoming: 56% Republican, 27% Democratic

    2. North Dakota: 56% Republican, 28% Democratic

    3. Utah: 56% Republican, 29% Democratic

    4. Idaho: 53% Republican, 31% Democratic

    5. Alaska: 52% Republican, 31% Democratic

    Source: Gallup

    The same Gallup poll found a majority of Republican support in 16 states, predominantly in the Great Plains region. The states with the most Grand Old Party (GOP) support were Wyoming, North Dakota, Utah, Idaho, and Alaska. Another 15 states in the poll were considered “competitive,” and did not lean toward a particular party.

  • Race and ethnicity — Democrats
    6/ Qqqqqq // Wikimedia Commons

    Race and ethnicity — Democrats

    White voters who identify or lean toward Democrat: 43%

    African-American voters who identify or lean toward Democrat: 84%

    Hispanic voters who identify or lean toward Democrat: 63%

    Asian-American voters who identify or lean toward Democrat: 65%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    Democratic support is strongest among African-American votes, according to the Pew Research Center. 84% of African-Americans support the party, along with 65% of Asian-American voters and 63% of Hispanic voters. White voters had the least support for Democrats among the four racial groups, with 43% of voters supporting the party.

  • Race and ethnicity — Republicans
    7/ Gage Skidmore // Wikimedia Commons

    Race and ethnicity — Republicans

    White voters who identify or lean toward Republican: 51%

    African-American voters who identify or lean toward Republican: 8%

    Hispanic voters who identify or lean toward Republican: 28%

    Asian-American voters who identify or lean toward Republican: 27%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    While white voter support for the Democrat party has increased in recent years, the racial group remains the strongest supporter of the Republican party. Hispanic voters are the second-strongest voting bloc, with 28% favoring the GOP over the Democrats.

  • Age — Democrats
    8/ State Farm // Flickr

    Age — Democrats

    Millennials (born 19811996) who identify or lean toward Democrat: 59%

    Generation X'ers (born 19651980) who identify or lean toward Democrat: 48%

    Baby boomers (born 19461964) who identify or lean toward Democrat: 48%

    Silent generation (born 19281945) who identify or lean toward Democrat: 43%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    A 2017 Pew Research Center poll found the strongest Democratic support among America’s youngest voters. Millennials, those born between 1981 and 1996, favored Democrats over Republicans among 59% of voters. Almost 50% of Generation X and the Baby Boomers support Democrats.

  • Age — Republicans
    9/ Pedro Ribeiro Simões // Flickr

    Age — Republicans

    Millennials (born 19811996) who identify or lean toward Republican: 32%

    Generation X'ers (born 19651980) who identify or lean toward Republican: 43%

    Baby boomers (born 19461964) who identify or lean toward Republican: 46%

    Silent generation (born 19281945) who identify or lean toward Republican: 52%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    Republican support is strongest among those born between 1928 and 1945. Baby Boomers have the second-most Republican support, with 46% of people in their age group backing the GOP.

     

  • Education level — Democrats
    10/ Austin Community College // Flickr

    Education level — Democrats

    Those with a high school degree or less who identify or lean toward Democrat: 45%

    Those with some college education who identify or lean toward Democrat: 47%

    Those with a four-year college degree who identify or lean toward Democrat: 54%

    Those with post-grad experience who identify or lean toward Democrat: 63%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    Democrats have the majority of voters with a bachelor’s or post-graduate degree, with 63% and 54%, respectively. According to the 2017 Pew Research Center poll, 49% of white voters with a bachelor’s degree sided with Democrats.

  • Education level — Republicans
    11/ kit // Wikimedia commons

    Education level — Republicans

    Those with a high school degree or less who identify or lean toward Republican:  47%

    Those with some college education who identify or lean toward Republican: 45%

    Those with a four-year college degree who identify or lean toward Republican: 39%

    Those with post-grad experience who identify or lean toward Republican: 31%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    In recent years, Republicans have increased their share of voters with less than a bachelor’s degree. The majority of their support comes from voters who list a high school degree or less as their highest level of education. This is especially true among white voters in this category. According to Pew, 58% of these voters side with Republicans.

  • Income level — Democrats
    12/ Investment Zen // Flickr

    Income level — Democrats

    Those with a $75,000+ income who identify or lean toward Democrat: 45%

    Those with a $30,000$74,999 income who identify or lean toward Democrat: 45%

    Those with a <$30,000 income who identify or lean toward Democrat: 60%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    The income distribution for Democratic voters leans heavily towards those with lower annual incomes. According to a 2016 Pew Research Center poll, 60% of people with incomes less than $30,000 supported the Democrats.

  • Income level — Republicans
    13/ Ken Teegardin // Flickr

    Income level — Republicans

    Those with a $75,000+ income who identify or lean toward Republican: 49%

    Those with a $30,000$74,999 income who identify or lean toward Republican: 48%

    Those with a <$30,000 income who identify or lean toward Republican: 32%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    Individuals with incomes higher than $75,000 identified or leaned toward the Republican party almost half the time. The same can be said for individuals with incomes above $30,000.

     

  • Community type — Democrats
    14/ KennethHan // Wikimedia Commons

    Community type — Democrats

    Those living in an urban community who identify or lean toward Democrat: 60%

    Those living in a suburban community who identify or lean toward Democrat: 44%

    Those living in a rural community who identify or lean toward Democrat: 37%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    Urban areas remain strongholds of Democratic support, as shown in a 2016 Pew Research Center poll. 60% of people living in urban areas identify or lean Democrat, compared to just 37% among people in rural communities.

  • Community type — Republicans
    15/ Mark Miller // Wikimedia Commons

    Community type — Republicans

    Those living in an urban community who identify or lean toward Republican: 33%

    Those living  in a suburban community who identify or lean toward Republican: 48%

    Those living in a rural community who identify or lean toward Republican: 55%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    Rural voters played a significant part in electing Republican President Donald J. Trump. The GOP base is strongly represented in rural areas, with 55% of rural voters siding with the party. That number goes down as you get closer to cities, with 33% of urban dwellers favoring the GOP.

  • Religion — Democrats
    16/ NCinDC // Flickr

    Religion — Democrats

    White Christian: 73% (White evangelical Protestant 35%; white mainline Protestant 18%; white Catholic 16%; Mormon 4%)

    Black Protestant: 1%

    Hispanic Protestant: 3%

    Hispanic Catholic: 3%

    Other Christian: 5%

    Jewish: 1%

    Other world religions: 1%

    Unaffiliated: 11%

    Believe in God, higher power or spiritual force: 86%

    Believe in God as described in the Bible: 45%

    Sources: Public Religion Research Institute and Pew Research Center

    Both parties have voters with strong spiritual beliefs: 86% of Democrat supporters and 95% of Republican supporters say they believe in God or a higher power, according to polling by the Public Religion Research Institute and the Pew Research Center. However, only 45% of Democrat supporters say they believe in a God as described in the Bible.

  • Religion — Republicans
    17/ AgnosticPreachersKid // Wikimedia Commons

    Religion — Republicans

    White Christian: 29% (White evangelical Protestant 8%; white mainline Protestant 11%; white Catholic 10%; Mormon 1%)

    Black Protestant: 17%

    Hispanic Protestant: 4%

    Hispanic Catholic: 10%

    Other Christian: 6%

    Jewish: 2%

    Other world religions: 3%

    Unaffiliated: 26%

    Believe in God, higher power or spiritual force: 95%

    Believe in God as described in the Bible: 70%

    Sources: Public Religion Research Institute and Pew Research Center

    Republican supporters were more likely to identify as religiously unaffiliated (26%) than Democrat-leaning voters (11%). 70% of GOP backers, however, believe in the God of the Bible.

  • Perspective on racism — Democrats
    18/ The All-Nite Images // Wikimedia Commons

    Perspective on racism — Democrats

    Democrats that view racism as a big problem in society: 76%

    Democrats who say they support the Black Lives Matter movement: 80%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    Racism continues to ravage American society; that is, if you talk to a Democrat. According to the Pew Research Center, 76% of Democratic voters believe that racism is an ongoing social problem. However, this is a sharp increase for these kinds of voters. In 2009, just 32% of voters said racism was an issue.

  • Perspective on racism — Republicans
    19/ The All-Nite Images // Wikimedia Commons

    Perspective on racism — Republicans

    Republicans that view racism as a big problem in society: 37%

    Republicans who say they support the Black Lives Matter movement: 23%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    The percentage of GOP supporters who say racism is a major social issue has been well-below the percentage of Democrats for almost a decade. In 2017, 37% of GOP voters agreed it was an issue, compared to the 18% who believed it wasn’t in 2009.

  • Perspective on climate change — Democrats
    20/ Rhododendrites // Wikimedia Commons

    Perspective on climate change — Democrats

    Believe there is solid evidence of global warming on Earth: 92%

    Believe stricter environmental laws and regulations are worth the cost: 77%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    Along with views on racism, belief in global warming is another issue sharply divided down partisan lines. According the Pew Research Center, 92% of Democratic supporters believe there is science-based evidence of climate change, a full 40 percentage points more than Republican supporters.

  • Perspective on climate change — Republicans
    21/ Mark Dixon // Wikimedia Commons

    Perspective on climate change — Republicans

    Believe there is solid evidence of global warming on Earth: 52%

    Believe stricter environmental laws and regulations are worth the cost: 36%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    74% of Americans believe there is scientific evidence of climate change, though just 52% of Republican voters feel that way. The number of Republicans who do not believe the science behind climate change is lower than it was a decade ago, according to Pew.

  • Perspective on guns — Democrats
    22/ Rhododendrites // Wikimedia Commons

    Perspective on guns — Democrats

    Favor preventing the mentally ill from purchasing guns: 89%

    Favor banning assault-style weapons: 80%

    Favor creating a federal database to track gun sales: 84%

    Favor allowing concealed carry in more places: 26%

    Favor allowing school officials to carry guns in K-12 schools: 26%

    Favor shortening waiting periods for buying guns legally: 25%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    Democratic voters show strong support for stricter gun measures, according to the Pew Research Center. 80% of voters favor banning assault-style firearms, and 84% feel there should be a federal database for all gun sales.

  • Perspective on guns — Republicans
    23/ Fibonacci Blue // Flickr

    Perspective on guns — Republicans

    Favor preventing the mentally ill from purchasing guns: 89%

    Favor banning assault-style weapons: 54%

    Favor creating a federal database to track gun sales: 56%

    Favor allowing concealed carry in more places: 72%

    Favor allowing school officials to carry guns in K-12 schools: 69%

    Favor shortening waiting periods for buying guns legally:  51%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    Support for preventing the mentally ill from purchasing a firearm is the only gun-related measure GOP and Democratic voters strongly agree with; both groups support these measures equally. GOP voters, however, are more likely to also support measures like allowing school officials to carry guns in schools (69%) or expanding places where concealed carry is allowed (72%).

  • Perspective on gay marriage — Democrats
    24/ AJ Alfieri-Crispin // Wikimedia Commons

    Perspective on gay marriage — Democrats

    Democrats who support gay marriage: 74%

    Growth in support over 20-year period (19962017): 41%

    Source: Gallup

    The majority of Americans support gay marriage (64%), according to a 2017 Gallup poll. Among Democratic voters, the support is stronger, with 74% of voters behind the measure. The Gallup poll notes that 2017 was the first time the majority of Protestant voters reported supporting gay marriage.

  • Perspective on gay marriage — Republicans
    25/ Straight Allies // Wikimedia Commons

    Perspective on gay marriage — Republicans

    Republicans who support gay marriage: 47%

    Growth in support over 20-year period (19962017): 31%

    Source: Gallup

    The majority of Republican voters still do not favor gay marriage. Despite a 31% increase since 1996, 53% of GOP backers do not support the 2015 Supreme Court decision that declared bans on same-sex marriage unconstitutional.

  • Perspective on legalizing marijuana — Democrats
    26/ Tony Webster // Flickr

    Perspective on legalizing marijuana — Democrats

    Democrats who support legalization: 72%

    Growth in support over five-year period (20122017): 15%

    Source: Gallup

    Medical marijuana is legal in 30 states and available recreationally in nine. According to a 2017 Gallup poll, support for legalizing marijuana is at its highest point across the country in 50 years. Among Democratic voters, 72% feel marijuana should be legal.

  • Perspective on legalizing marijuana — Republicans
    27/ Tony Webster // Wikimedia Commons

    Perspective on legalizing marijuana — Republicans

    Republicans who support legalization: 51%

    Growth in support over five-year period (20122017): 16%

    Source: Gallup

    While the majority of both parties’ voters favor legalizing marijuana, the support is more subdued among GOP voters. Just more than half (51%) feel it should be legalized. Republican support for the measure in the past five years has grown alongside Democratic support, as well.

  • Favorite TV shows — Democrats
    28/ Home Box Office (HBO)

    Favorite TV shows — Democrats

    1. "Game of Thrones"
    2. "The Haves and the Have Nots"
    3. "Supernatural"
    4. "The Big Bang Theory"
    5. "Suits"
    6. "The Walking Dead"
    7. "How to Get Away with Murder"
    8. "Doctor Who"
    9. "Empire"
    10. "Nashville"

    Source: E-Poll Market Research

    Democratic supporters favor shows with more ethnically diverse casts than their Republican counterparts. Highly rated TV shows for Democratic voters include “Game of Thrones,” “The Haves and the Have Nots,” and “Empire, according to E-Poll Market Research.

  • Favorite TV shows — Republicans
    29/ Kripke Enterprises

    Favorite TV shows — Republicans

    1. "Supernatural"
    2. "The Walking Dead"
    3. "Scorpion"
    4. "Arrow"
    5. "The Flash"
    6. "The Big Bang Theory"
    7. "NCIS"
    8. "Blue Bloods"
    9. "Grimm"
    10. "Last Man Standing"

    Source: E-Poll Market Research

    Republican voters tend to favor more family-friendly shows, like “The Flash,” “The Big Bang Theory,” and “Last Man Standing.”

  • Popular sources of news — Democrats
    30/ David Dolphin // Flickr

    Popular sources of news — Democrats

    Audience is more moderate: Yahoo News, The Wall Street Journal, NBC News, CNN, MSNBC

    Audience is more liberal: "The Daily Show," The Guardian, Al-Jazeera America, NPR, "The Colbert Report," The New York Times, The New Yorker, Slate

    Source: Pew Research Center

    Democratic voters tend to have a more varied media diet than Republican voters. Among moderate Democrats, top news sources include Yahoo News, The Wall Street Journal, and CNN. More liberal voters are likely to get their news from The Guardian, "The Daily Show," NPR, The New York Times, and Slate.

  • Popular sources of news — Republicans
    31/ Johnny Silvercloud // Flickr

    Popular sources of news — Republicans

    Audience is more moderate: "Fox News," "Drudge Report"

    Audience is more conservative: Breitbart, “The Rush Limbaugh Show,” TheBlaze, “The Sean Hannity Show,” “Glenn Beck Program”

    Source: Pew Research Center

    Republican voters favor "Fox News" and "Drudge Report." The more conservative the GOP voter, the more likely they are to get news from Breitbart, TheBlaze, or “The Sean Hannity Show.”

  • Favorite U.S. presidents — Democrats
    32/ Nick Knupffer // Flickr

    Favorite U.S. presidents — Democrats

    1. Barack Obama: 71%
    2. Bill Clinton: 49%
    3. John F. Kennedy: 14%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    President Barack Obama is held in high regard among Democratic voters. According to a 2018 Pew Research Center poll, 71% of Democratic voters say Obama was the best president in their lifetimes. Bill Clinton and John F. Kennedy were other favorites.

  • Favorite U.S. presidents — Republicans
    33/ Michael Evans // Wikimedia Commons

    Favorite U.S. presidents — Republicans

    1. Ronald Reagan: 57%
    2. Donald Trump: 40%
    3. George W. Bush: 20%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    Among Republican voters, Ronald Reagan is the most highly regarded president. Current U.S. president Donald J. Trump was second, with 40% of voters saying he is the best president in their lifetime.

     

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