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Longest-running Billboard #1 singles from the 1960s

  • Longest-running Billboard #1 singles from the 1960s
    1/ Nationaal Archief // Wikimedia Commons

    Longest-running Billboard #1 singles from the 1960s

    The 1960s are often remembered as a decade filled with social and political change, in a manner not dissimilar to today’s climate. Amidst the upheaval of gender norms and racial bias, popular music was undergoing its own revolution. While the music of the 1960s began with the lullaby-like sounds of acts like Elvis Presley and The Everly Brothers, the decade of peace and love ended with the socially conscious grooves of Marvin Gaye and psychedelic funk of The Beatles.

    It’s difficult to know if these acts were as popular as today’s culture suggests, or if society is remembering them through rose-colored glasses. Were iconic acts like The Beatles and The Rolling Stones the reigning kings of the charts? Or did one-hit wonders like The Archies, and Zager and Evans hold on to that #1 spot the longest?

    In order to sort it all out, Stacker has turned to one source that remembers the 1960s more clearly than anyone: the Billboard charts. Using data from Wikipedia, Stacker compiled a ranking of all #1 singles between 19601969. Songs that spent the same amount of time on the charts are ranked in the order they were released. Read on to find out which singles kept Billboard listeners grooving up through the Summer of Love and beyond.

    RELATED: Click here to see the most famous musician born the same year as you.

  • #44. Sugar, Sugar
    2/ YouTube

    #44. Sugar, Sugar

    Artist: The Archies
    Number of weeks at #1: 4
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Sept. 20, 1969

    While Archie, Veronica, Betty, and Jughead can be found today on the CW’s teen drama “Riverdale,” in 1969 they were busy tearing up the charts. The fictional band—comprised of co-songwriter Andy Kim, along with local session musicians—was assembled by Don Kirshner, the talent manager who put together The Monkees, among other famous groups of the era.

  • #43. Honky Tonk Women
    3/ Gorupdebesanez // Wikimedia Commons

    #43. Honky Tonk Women

    Artist: The Rolling Stones
    Number of weeks at #1: 4
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Aug. 23, 1969

    The first single to be released after the death of their rhythm guitarist, Brian Jones, this country-influenced tune helped get the Stones their third Billboard #1. Although the song’s lyrics reference the American West, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards wrote it while on tour in Brazil.

  • #42. Dizzy
    4/ YouTube

    #42. Dizzy

    Artist: Tommy Roe
    Number of weeks at #1: 4
    Date first entered into Hot 100: March 15, 1969

    Although this song spent four weeks at the top of the charts, it was the last #1 hit for Tommy Roe. The song lives on, however, having been covered numerous times since its release in 1968.

  • #41. Everyday People
    5/ Simon Fernandez // Wikimedia Commons

    #41. Everyday People

    Artist: Sly and the Family Stone
    Number of weeks at #1: 4
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Feb. 15, 1969

    This first #1 hit from Sly and the Family Stone was also the first single from their fourth album, “Stand!” Some have argued that Sly’s message of racial acceptance is just as relevant today as it was in 1968.

  • #40. This Guy's in Love with You
    6/ General Artists Corporation (GAC)/A&M Records (management and record companies) // Wikimedia Commons

    #40. This Guy's in Love with You

    Artist: Herb Alpert
    Number of weeks at #1: 4
    Date first entered into Hot 100: June 22, 1968

    As an artist who split his time between singing and playing trumpet in the Tijuana Brass Band, Herb Alpert is considered an unlikely chart success by today’s standards. However, Alpert would see the top of the Billboard charts again in 1979 with the instrumental track “Rise.”

  • #39. (Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay
    7/ Billboard, page 7, 7 January 1967 // Wikimedia Commons

    #39. (Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay

    Artist: Otis Redding
    Number of weeks at #1: 4
    Date first entered into Hot 100: March 16, 1968

    This posthumous release from Otis Redding won two Grammys in 1968, for Best Rhythm and Blues Performance, and Best Rhythm and Blues Song. Although it has since become one of Redding’s most popular songs, record executives almost didn’t release it after it was recorded.

  • #38. Daydream Believer
    8/ Billboard // Wikimedia Commons

    #38. Daydream Believer

    Artist: The Monkees
    Number of weeks at #1: 4
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Dec. 2, 1967

    This last #1 hit for The Monkees was written by songwriter John Stewart, who had previously made his name as a part of the Kingston Trio. Despite the song’s dark lyrics about the pitfalls of suburban marriage, it provided a successful swan song for the teen-pop band.

  • #37. The Letter
    9/ YouTube

    #37. The Letter

    Artist: The Box Tops
    Number of weeks at #1: 4
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Sept.23, 1967

    This blue-eyed soul hit introduced listeners to singer Alex Chilton, who would later go on to front the cult classic '70s group Big Star. As if being the frontman of two successful rock groups wasn’t enough, Chilton recorded the vocals for “The Letter” when he was only 16.

  • #36. Ode to Billie Joe
    10/ nicht erforderlich // Wikimedia Commons

    #36. Ode to Billie Joe

    Artist: Bobbie Gentry
    Number of weeks at #1: 4
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Aug. 26, 1967

    At the time of its release, the plot of this mysterious country ballad left listeners so fascinated that it was later adapted into a novel and a film. Although Bobbie Gentry abruptly retired from music in 1983, she has continued to serve as an influence for today’s country and folk artists.

  • #35. Windy
    11/ YouTube

    #35. Windy

    Artist: The Association
    Number of weeks at #1: 4
    Date first entered into Hot 100: July 1, 1967

    This song was the second #1 hit for The Association, a California pop band with multiple vocalists. Jazz guitarist Wes Montgomery later scored his highest-charting hit with his cover of the song.

  • #34. Groovin'
    12/ Associated Booking Corporation // Wikimedia Commons

    #34. Groovin'

    Artist: The Young Rascals
    Number of weeks at #1: 4
    Date first entered into Hot 100: May 20, 1967

    By the time The Young Rascals released this 1967 hit, they were widely known for soul and R&B numbers like “Lonely Too Long” and “I Ain’t Gonna Eat Out My Heart Anymore.” However, it took the Latin grooves of “Groovin’,” inspired by lead singer Felix Cavaliere’s time in New York’s Catskill Mountains, to send them to the top of the charts.

  • #33. Somethin' Stupid
    13/ CBS Television // Wikimedia Commons

    #33. Somethin' Stupid

    Artist: Nancy Sinatra and Frank Sinatra
    Number of weeks at #1: 4
    Date first entered into Hot 100: April 15, 1967

    This duet between Nancy Sinatra and Ol’ Blue Eyes himself is known as the only father-daughter duet to hit #1 on the Billboard charts. Although the song’s romantic lyrics left some listeners feeling uneasy, the duo would sing together again on the singles “Feelin’ Kinda Sunday” and “Life’s a Trippy Thing” in 1970 and 1971, respectively.

  • #32. Yesterday
    14/ Vedi informazioni sull'autore // Wikimedia Commons

    #32. Yesterday

    Artist: The Beatles
    Number of weeks at #1: 4
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Oct. 9, 1965

    This melancholy ballad kept Paul McCartney and the rest of The Beatles on top of the charts for four weeks straight. By 1999, the song had received more than 7 million radio airplays. Not bad for a song that started out as an ode to breakfast food.

  • #31. (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction
    15/ Riksarkivet (National Archives of Norway) // Flickr

    #31. (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction

    Artist: The Rolling Stones
    Number of weeks at #1: 4
    Date first entered into Hot 100: July 10, 1965

    Although this song became famous for its now-iconic guitar riff, it could have had a much different sound. Keith Richards recorded the riff in his sleep after hearing it in a dream, and intended to replace it with a horn section in the recording studio.

  • #30. Baby Love
    16/ GAC-General Artists Corporation-IMTI-International Talent Management Inc. // Wikimedia Commons

    #30. Baby Love

    Artist: The Supremes
    Number of weeks at #1: 4
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Oct. 31, 1964

    By the time The Supremes recorded this classic R&B number, they were struggling to shake their reputation as a “no-hit” girl group. Fortunately for them, “Baby Love” was the first of the group’s five #1 hits, two of which they’d earn within the same year.

  • #29. There! I've Said It Again
    17/ CBS Television // Wikimedia Commons

    #29. There! I've Said It Again

    Artist: Bobby Vinton
    Number of weeks at #1: 4
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Jan. 4, 1964

    Bobby Vinton recorded the vocals for his cover of this 1945 hit in one take. He’d later see the top of the charts at the end of 1964, with his hit “Mr. Lonely.”

     

  • #28. Dominique
    18/ YouTube

    #28. Dominique

    Artist: The Singing Nun
    Number of weeks at #1: 4
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Dec. 7, 1963

    This 1963 track from Dominican former nun Jeannine Deckers is known as the only Belgian track to hit #1 on the American Billboard charts. While “The Singing Nun” never again reached the commercial heights of “Dominique,” a 2009 biopic has drawn new attention to her unlikely pop career.

  • #27. He's So Fine
    19/ KRLA Beat // Wikimedia Commons

    #27. He's So Fine

    Artist: The Chiffons
    Number of weeks at #1: 4
    Date first entered into Hot 100: March 30, 1963

    Although this debut single from The Chiffons was enough to send them to the top of the charts, it was the group’s only #1 hit of their career. The song later became the focal point of a lawsuit against former Beatle George Harrison, who was accused of plagiarizing the song for his 1970 hit “My Sweet Lord.”

  • #26. Roses Are Red (My Love)
    20/ William Morris Agency (managment) // Wikimedia Commons

    #26. Roses Are Red (My Love)

    Artist: Bobby Vinton
    Number of weeks at #1: 4
    Date first entered into Hot 100: July 14, 1962

    This 1962 hit was a career-saver for Bobby Vinton, who picked the song from a pile of rejects after a meeting with his record label turned sour. The song would later be featured in Martin Scorsese’s film “Goodfellas,” where it was lip-synced by Vinton’s son Robbie.

  • #25. Runaway
    21/ Billboard // Wikimedia Commons

    #25. Runaway

    Artist: Del Shannon
    Number of weeks at #1: 4
    Date first entered into Hot 100: April 24, 1961

    This haunting 1961 track was the first and only #1 hit for Del Shannon. Although he never matched the success of “Runaway,” he continued to tour and record music up until his death in 1990.

  • #24. Stuck on You
    22/ Frederick M. Brown // Getty Images

    #24. Stuck on You

    Artist: Elvis Presley
    Number of weeks at #1: 4
    Date first entered into Hot 100: April 25, 1960

    Elvis Presley’s first #1 hit marked his return to the charts after a two-year stint in the U.S. Army. He later performed the track on “Frank Sinatra’s Timex Special,” where Sinatra introduced the King of Rock and Roll to an even wider audience.

  • #23. Get Back
    23/ Nationaal Archief // Wikimedia Commons

    #23. Get Back

    Artist: The Beatles with Billy Preston
    Number of weeks at #1: 5
    Date first entered into Hot 100: May 24, 1969

    This 1969 track was recorded for a hypothetical album called “Get Back,” meant to serve as a shot in the arm for the Fab Four after the difficult sessions for their 1968 self-titled album. Although the “Get Back” album wasn’t released until after The Beatles’ breakup in 1970—then retitled “Let It Be”—the track was a late-career success for the band.

  • #22. People Got to Be Free
    24/ YouTube

    #22. People Got to Be Free

    Artist: The Rascals
    Number of weeks at #1: 5
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Aug. 17, 1968

    Coming just one year after the success of their #1 hit “Groovin’,” “People Got to Be Free” marked the last time The Rascals would see the top of the charts. The song was inspired by the racial tension the band witnessed when touring the southern U.S.

     

  • #21. Honey
    25/ CHRISTO DRUMMKOPF // Flickr

    #21. Honey

    Artist: Bobby Goldsboro
    Number of weeks at #1: 5
    Date first entered into Hot 100: April 13, 1968

    Bobby Goldsboro’s only #1 hit tells the story of a widower as he remembers his deceased wife. While the song’s tearjerking lyrics were enough to send it to #1 for five weeks, it hasn’t been remembered fondly by some members of the Flower Power generation.

  • #20. Love is Blue
    26/ YouTube

    #20. Love is Blue

    Artist: Paul Mauriat
    Number of weeks at #1: 5
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Feb. 10, 1968

    Although this song debuted as an entry in the 1967 Eurovision Song Contest, it was Paul Mauriat’s instrumental cover that took “Love is Blue” to the top of the charts. Mauriat’s recording is emblematic of the “easy-listening” genre that became popular in the 1960s, and was even featured on a season finale of the '60s period drama “Mad Men.”

     

  • #19. To Sir With Love
    27/ Nick // Wikimedia Commons

    #19. To Sir With Love

    Artist: Lulu
    Number of weeks at #1: 5
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Oct. 21, 1967

    This #1 comes from the from the soundtrack of the 1967 film of the same name, in which Sidney Poitier plays a black engineer who takes a job teaching a class of white children. “To Sir With Love” came into the spotlight once again last year, when the “Saturday Night Live” cast parodied the song as a farewell to President Barack Obama.

  • #18. Ballad of the Green Berets
    28/ CHRISTO DRUMMKOPF // Flickr

    #18. Ballad of the Green Berets

    Artist: SSgt Barry Sadler
    Number of weeks at #1: 5
    Date first entered into Hot 100: March 5, 1966

    In contrast to many of the anti-war songs of the 1960s, this #1 hit is a send-up to the Green Berets of the Army Special Forces. Songwriter Barry Sadler was a member of the Special Forces himself, and wrote the song after leaving the military due to injuries.

  • #17. Can't Buy Me Love
    29/ West Midlands Police // Wikimedia Commons

    #17. Can't Buy Me Love

    Artist: The Beatles
    Number of weeks at #1: 5
    Date first entered into Hot 100: April 4, 1964

    This 1964 hit for the Beatles was written while the group was playing a residency in Paris. The song’s romantic, anti-consumerist lyrics have caused listeners to speculate that it may be an ode to prostitution. However, songwriter Paul McCartney has strongly denied these allegations.

  • #16. Sugar Shack
    30/ We hope // Wikimedia Commons

    #16. Sugar Shack

    Artist: Jimmy Gilmer and the Fireballs
    Number of weeks at #1: 5
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Oct. 12, 1963

    This song’s famous whistle-sounding riff is the product of a 1940s Hammond organ, played in the studio by producer Norman Petty. It was the only #1 for Jimmy Gilmer and the Fireballs, who made the charts for the last time in 1964 with “Ain’t Gonna Tell Anybody.”

  • #15. Big Girls Don't Cry
    31/ Cary Buffington // YouTube

    #15. Big Girls Don't Cry

    Artist: The Four Seasons
    Number of weeks at #1: 5
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Nov. 17, 1962

    The second #1 hit for The Four Seasons, “Big Girls Don’t Cry” features the same falsetto vocals that sent their debut “Sherry” to the top of the charts. The song’s lyrics were inspired by the strained gender relations depicted in films like “Tennessee’s Partner.”

  • #14. Sherry
    32/ Viniciusmc // Wikimedia Commons

    #14. Sherry

    Artist: The Four Seasons
    Number of weeks at #1: 5
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Sept. 15, 1962

    The Four Seasons’ debut single was also their first of five #1 hits. Songwriter and keyboardist Bob Gaudio claimed to have written the song in 15 minutes, a process that was later depicted in the hit Broadway musical and film “Jersey Boys.”

  • #13. I Can't Stop Loving You
    33/ Mallory1180 // Wikimedia Commons

    #13. I Can't Stop Loving You

    Artist: Ray Charles
    Number of weeks at #1: 5
    Date first entered into Hot 100: June 2, 1962

    This 1962 single comes from Charles’ album “Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music.” At the time when the Civil Rights Movement was still a grassroots campaign, Charles’ decision to record a country album was seen as a radical choice by the music industry.

  • #12. Big Bad John
    34/ William Morris Agency // Wikimedia Commons

    #12. Big Bad John

    Artist: Jimmy Dean
    Number of weeks at #1: 5
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Nov.r 6, 1961

    The inspiration for this 1961 hit came from John Minto, an actor Jimmy Dean had befriended earlier in his career. Although the song was Jimmy Dean’s only #1 hit, the singer’s name would later become ubiquitous through his popular brand of breakfast sausages.

     

  • #11. It's Now or Never
    35/ Keystone // Getty Images

    #11. It's Now or Never

    Artist: Elvis Presley
    Number of weeks at #1: 5
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Aug. 15, 1960

    Although Elvis became famous off the raucous sound of hits like “Hound Dog” and “A Big Hunk O’ Love,” it was this reworking of a 1901 Italian tune that would become one of his biggest hits. Elvis was introduced to the song while serving in the U.S. Army, and requested that his publisher write English lyrics for the tune originally known as “O Sole Mio.”

  • #10. Cathy's Clown
    36/ GaHetNa (Nationaal Archief NL) // Wikimedia Commons

    #10. Cathy's Clown

    Artist: The Everly Brothers
    Number of weeks at #1: 5
    Date first entered into Hot 100: May 23, 1960

    The Everly Brothers’ first #1 hit after signing a $1 million contract with Columbia Records didn’t come easy to the duo. “Cathy’s Clown” was the ninth single they recorded for their label debut. The song was later an unlikely #1 for Reba McEntire, who recorded the song with slightly altered lyrics in 1989.

  • #9. In the Year 2525 (Exordium and Terminus)
    37/ YouTube

    #9. In the Year 2525 (Exordium and Terminus)

    Artist: Zager and Evans
    Number of weeks at #1: 6
    Date first entered into Hot 100: July 12, 1969

    Although this futuristic 1969 hit sent Zager and Evans blasting off to the top of the charts, their pop career would stall out well before the year 2525. None of their subsequent singles cracked the Billboard Hot 100, landing them firmly on “planet one-hit wonder.”

  • #8. Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In (The Flesh Failures)
    38/ Arnie Lee // Wikimedia Commons

    #8. Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In (The Flesh Failures)

    Artist: The 5th Dimension
    Number of weeks at #1: 6
    Date first entered into Hot 100: April 12, 1969

    While the 1967 musical “Hair” garnered controversy for its open depictions of the free love movement, its music had no problem wooing listeners. This medley of two tracks from the musical granted The 5th Dimension their first #1 hit.

  • #7. Are You Lonesome Tonight?
    39/ Hulton Archive // Getty Images

    #7. Are You Lonesome Tonight?

    Artist: Elvis Presley
    Number of weeks at #1: 6
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Nov. 28, 1960

    Much like “It’s Now or Never,” “Are You Lonesome Tonight” was a reworking of a decades-old pop hit. Although “Lonesome” was written in 1926 by Roy Turk and Lou Handman, Elvis’ modern, quiet croon and vocal echo made the tune a hit with audiences more than three decades later.

  • #6. I Heard It Through the Grapevine
    40/ tomovox // Flickr

    #6. I Heard It Through the Grapevine

    Artist: Marvin Gaye
    Number of weeks at #1: 7
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Dec. 14, 1968

    When Marvin Gaye took to the microphone to record “Grapevine,” the song was already a Motown classic, having been recorded by Gladys Knight in 1967. Fortunately, listeners didn’t mind hearing Gaye’s take on the song, which inspired a number of covers from artists like Creedence Clearwater Revival, Roger Troutman, and punk band The Slits.

  • #5. I'm a Believer
    41/ Billboard // Wikimedia Commons

    #5. I'm a Believer

    Artist: The Monkees
    Number of weeks at #1: 7
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Dec. 31, 1966

    The Monkees’ second #1 hit was penned by acclaimed songwriter Neil Diamond, who would later go on to have three #1 hits of his own. Smash Mouth covered the song for the soundtrack of the 2001 film “Shrek,” albeit to much less acclaim.

  • #4. I Want to Hold Your Hand
    42/ Nationaal Archief // Wikimedia Commons

    #4. I Want to Hold Your Hand

    Artist: The Beatles
    Number of weeks at #1: 7
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Feb. 1, 1964

    The Beatles’ first #1 hit in America marked the start of the British Invasion, as well as The Beatles’ dominance over the pop charts for the rest of the decade. Over the course of their six-year career, their songs would top the Billboard Hot 100 for a grand total of 59 weeks.

  • #3. Tossin' and Turnin'
    43/ YouTube

    #3. Tossin' and Turnin'

    Artist: Bobby Lewis
    Number of weeks at #1: 7
    Date first entered into Hot 100: July 10, 1961

    Although Bobby Lewis’ debut single sent him tossin’ and turnin’ to the top of the charts, once he tumbled down, he never got back up. The singer followed up the biggest hit of 1961 with three more singles, none of which matched the success of “Tossin’ and Turnin’.”

  • #2. Hey Jude
    44/ DLindsley // Wikimedia Commons

    #2. Hey Jude

    Artist: The Beatles
    Number of weeks at #1: 9
    Date first entered into Hot 100: September 28, 1968

    This Beatles ballad marked the first single released by then newly-minted label, Apple Records. Written by Paul McCartney as a pick-me-up for John Lennon’s son, Julian, the song became the longest-charting single The Beatles ever released. The song remains a favorite among fans of the Fab Four, with a handwritten copy of the song’s lyrics going on sale for $375,000 in 2018.

  • #1. Theme from A Summer Place
    45/ OTRR.org // Wikimedia Commons

    #1. Theme from A Summer Place

    Artist: Percy Faith and His Orchestra
    Number of weeks at #1: 9
    Date first entered into Hot 100: Feb. 22, 1960

    Remarkably, The Beatles’ only match for chart length in the '60s is this instrumental recording of a song from the 1959 film “A Summer Place.” Although the song marks Percy Faith’s only #1 hit, it won him the Grammy for Record of the Year in 1960.

     

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