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100 best 90s movies

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Universal Pictures

Ranking the best movies of the 90s

The 1990s were a magical decade for pop culture. The OJ Simpson trial, gangster rap and “Friends” dominated water cooler conversations, while the Internet was just beginning to grab the attention of the world. While all of this was happening, incredible movies were being released nearly every weekend. Advances in computer-generated imagery gave audiences both the scariest dinosaurs they’d ever seen (“Jurassic Park”) and a heartwarming story of a cowboy and astronaut discovering life outside of the toy box (“Toy Story”).

To celebrate the incredible cinematic achievements of the decade, Stacker compiled this list that ranks the best movies of the 90s. The rankings were compiled using user ratings from IMDb for movies released between January 1, 1990 and December 31, 1999. Only films with more than 5,000 votes qualified for the list and any ties were broken by the higher number of votes to reflect overall popularity. Click through to discover which obscure Japanese film beat out a James L. Brooks classic and which big movie star made the list multiple times.

RELATED: Top 100 TV shows of the '60s

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Paramount Pictures

#100. The Godfather: Part III

IMDb rating: 7.6

IMDb votes: 310,731

Director: Francis Ford Coppola

Release year: 1990

“The Godfather: Parts I & II” are undeniable classics. “The Godfather: Part III” is…a movie. It picks up in the late 1970s and follows Michael Corleone’s quest for absolute power within his mafia family. Nominated for seven Oscars, including Best Picture, the film is also notable for featuring a young Sofia Coppola, the director’s daughter—who went on to become a major director in her own right with films like “Lost in Translation” and “The Virgin Suicides.”

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Twentieth Century Fox

#99. Die Hard with a Vengeance

IMDb rating: 7.6

IMDb votes: 327,535

Director: John McTiernan

Release year: 1995

The third installment of the “Die Hard” franchise finds wily detective John McClane (Bruce Willis) teaming up with Samuel L. Jackson to stop a federal bank heist, orchestrated by a terrorist played by Jeremy Irons. The film was the second highest-grossing movie of 1995, just behind “Toy Story.”

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Universal Pictures

#98. The Cure

IMDb rating: 7.7

IMDb votes: 8,302

Director: Peter Horton

Release year: 1995

90s teen heartthrob Brad Renfro stars in this heartwarming tale of a wayward teenager who befriends a boy with AIDS and vows to help him find a cure. Before it was directed by Peter Horton, big-time directors like Steven Spielberg and Sydney Pollack were said to be interested in helming the movie.

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Ang Lee Productions

#97. The Wedding Banquet

IMDb rating: 7.7

IMDb votes: 12,070

Director: Ang Lee

Release year: 1993

Taiwanese director Ang Lee found his first major American success in “The Wedding Banquet,” the story of a gay Taiwanese man in Manhattan who agrees to marry a Chinese woman in need of a green card. The film was nominated for Best Foreign Film at both the Academy Awards and Golden Globes.

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TriStar Television

#96. Gettysburg

IMDb rating: 7.7

IMDb votes: 23,549

Director: Ron Maxwell

Release year: 1993

Originally intended as a cable TV miniseries—which explains its gigantic 271-minute runtime—“Gettysburg” chronicles the events surrounding the July 1863 Civil War battle. While the historical drama cost $25 million to make, it made back less than half of that at the box office.

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Warner Bros.

#95. A Little Princess

IMDb rating: 7.7

IMDb votes: 27,883

Director: Alfonso Cuarón

Release year: 1995

Before ascending in the directing world for his work on the “Harry Potter” films, Alfonso Cuarón directed this pseudo-fairytale of a wealthy girl banished to servitude at a New York boarding school when her father is presumed dead in World War I. While it didn’t get the attention it deserved in its release, the film has since found an adoring audience: it currently holds a 97% “fresh” rating from Rotten Tomatoes.

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Rhombus Media

#94. The Red Violin

IMDb rating: 7.7

IMDb votes: 28,961

Director: François Girard

Release year: 1998

The star of this Canadian drama is the violin in the title, which provides the backbone for all of its owners' stories across multiple centuries and continents. Samuel L. Jackson stars as an appraiser who identifies the legendary violin after it has belonged to families throughout Europe and Asia.

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Fine Line Features

#93. Short Cuts

IMDb rating: 7.7

IMDb votes: 38,246

Director: Robert Altman

Release year: 1993

Raymond Chandler’s short stories provide the narrative frame for this interwoven tale of disconnection and longing amid an ensemble of characters in Los Angeles. Director Robert Altman was nominated for an Academy Award for his work on the film, which featured stars like Julianne Moore, Tim Robbins and Andie MacDowell.

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Walt Disney Pictures

#92. The Muppet Christmas Carol

IMDb rating: 7.7

IMDb votes: 39,732

Director: Brian Henson

Release year: 1992

Eight years after the success of “The Muppets Take Manhattan,” Jim Henson’s son Brian took over the franchise with this interpretation of Dickens’ beloved tale, “A Christmas Carol.” Michael Caine plays miserly Ebenezer Scrooge, while the Muppets enact most of the other parts. The film was dedicated to Jim Henson, the Muppets’ original creator, who passed away just two years before the film’s release.

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Universal Pictures

#91. Fried Green Tomatoes

IMDb rating: 7.7

IMDb votes: 58,372

Director: Jon Avnet

Release year: 1991

The title may sound delicious, but this Southern story is a bittersweet tale about a frustrated housewife (Kathy Bates) who befriends an elderly woman (Jessica Tandy) in a nursing home. Tandy’s character shares the story of a now-abandoned town and the tragedies that happened there. The film is based on a 1987 novel by Fannie Flagg.

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Warner Bros.

#90. Malcolm X

IMDb rating: 7.7

IMDb votes: 71,736

Director: Spike Lee

Release year: 1992

Spike Lee cast Denzel Washington to play the title character in this biopic that depicts the life of one of the Civil Rights movement’s most important leaders. At more than three hours long, Lee was able to include scenes from Malcolm X’s early days, all the way until his assassination. Spike Lee included cameos of figures who played a large role in black rights around the world, including South African president and former political prisoner Nelson Mandela.

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Pandora Filmproduktion

#89. Dead Man

IMDb rating: 7.7

IMDb votes: 80,194

Director: Jim Jarmusch

Release year: 1995

One of the rare Westerns to make the list, “Dead Man” features Johnny Depp as an accountant who moves to the frontier for a job—and winds up on a psychedelic journey with a Native American after being accused of murder. Director Jim Jarmusch shot the film completely in black-and-white, and received a nomination for the prestigious Palme D’Or at the Cannes Film Festival.

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Columbia Pictures Corporation

#88. Sense and Sensibility

IMDb rating: 7.7

IMDb votes: 87,528

Director: Ang Lee

Release year: 1995

Ang Lee followed up his “Wedding Banquet” success with a completely different type of movie: a period adaptation of Jane Austen’s “Sense and Sensibility.” Written by Emma Thompson (who also stars in the movie and won an Academy Award for her script), the film also earned a Best Picture nomination—likely in part to its all-star cast, which features Kate Winslet, Hugh Grant and Tom Wilkinson.

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Circle Films

#87. Barton Fink

IMDb rating: 7.7

IMDb votes: 99,607

Director: Joel Coen

Release year: 1991

Set in the 1940s, “Barton Fink” stars John Turturro as its title character: a New York playwright who moves to Hollywood to write terrible movies and ends up suffering from writer’s block. The Coen Brothers wrote and directed the film, which won the 1991 Palme D’Or in Cannes.

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Gramercy Pictures (I)

#86. Dazed and Confused

IMDb rating: 7.7

IMDb votes: 140,130

Director: Richard Linklater

Release year: 1993

Still a favorite of college kids everywhere, “Dazed and Confused” is Linklater’s tribute to the last days of innocence in 1976—as a group of junior high kids get ready to enter high school and the high school kids try to make the most of their summer via drugs, alcohol and sex. A young Matthew McConaughey became the breakout star of the movie and invented his catchphrase “Alright, alright, alright” (while an even younger Ben Affleck played a supporting role).

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Touchstone Pictures

#85. Rushmore

IMDb rating: 7.7

IMDb votes: 151,000

Director: Wes Anderson

Release year: 1998

American auteur Wes Anderson followed up his indie hit “Bottle Rocket” with this idiosyncratic story of a high school playwriting wunderkind (Jason Schwartzman) who befriends a downtrodden businessman (Bill Murray) as they both fall for the same woman. The film transformed Murray from big-budget comedy star into indie film darling, and won Anderson Best Director at the Independent Spirit Awards.

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Paramount Pictures

#84. Primal Fear

IMDb rating: 7.7

IMDb votes: 151,820

Director: Gregory Hoblit

Release year: 1996

Richard Gere, Edward Norton and Laura Linney star in this mystery thriller, which tells the story of an altar boy accused of murdering a priest and the reality of what justice really means. Norton makes his feature film debut, and wound up with a Golden Globe and an Oscar nomination for his efforts. The script was adapted from a William Diehl novel.

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Mystery Clock Cinema

#83. Dark City

IMDb rating: 7.7

IMDb votes: 171,811

Director: Alex Proyas

Release year: 1998

In a futuristic world that’s perpetually dark, a man wakes up with amnesia and discovers that he’s wanted for murder. Rufus Sewell plays the amnesiac in this noir sci-fi thriller, while Kiefer Sutherland and Jennifer Connolly round out the main cast. Film critic Roger Ebert gave the film five stars and noted similarities between “Dark City” and “The Matrix,” which came out the following year and was partially shot at the same studio in Australia.

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TriStar Pictures

#82. Philadelphia

IMDb rating: 7.7

IMDb votes: 197,874

Director: Jonathan Demme

Release year: 1993

Tom Hanks had made his career as a goofy leading man in films like “Splash” and “Turner & Hooch” before proving his serious acting chops in “Philadelphia.” In this intense drama, he plays an HIV-positive lawyer fighting for his career after being fired for his condition. Denzel Washington co-stars in the film that earned Hanks his first Best Actor Oscar.

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Columbia Pictures Corporation

#81. A Few Good Men

IMDb rating: 7.7

IMDb votes: 203,798

Director: Rob Reiner

Release year: 1992

Military justice is at the core of “A Few Good Men,” which was based on a play by Aaron Sorkin (who would go on to create TV’s “The West Wing,” as well as films like “The Social Network”). Tom Cruise plays a military lawyer defending a group of Marines on trial for murder. Jack Nicholson was nominated for an Oscar for his performance as the colonel who tries to cover up the crime—shouting the film’s famous line, “You can’t handle the truth!”

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Fear and Loathing LLC

#80. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas

IMDb rating: 7.7

IMDb votes: 232,945

Director: Terry Gilliam

Release year: 1998

Terry Gilliam first enjoyed fame as a member of British comedy troupe Monty Python before finding success as a director with a reputation for surrealist fare like “Brazil” and “Time Bandits.” In “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas,” Gilliam took the outlandish story of Hunter S. Thompson (Johnny Depp) trying to cover a motorcycle race in Vegas for Rolling Stone Magazine and put it on the silver screen. While the movie didn’t capture the hearts of critics in the U.S., it did earn Gilliam a Palme D’Or nomination in Cannes.

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TriStar Pictures

#79. As Good as It Gets

IMDb rating: 7.7

IMDb votes: 245,031

Director: James L. Brooks

Release year: 1997

Both Jack Nicholson and Helen Hunt won Oscars for their roles in this comedic drama about an unlikely friendship trio that forms between a single mother, a persnickety novelist and a gay artist (Greg Kinnear) who gets seriously injured in a robbery attempt. A box-office smash, this Best Picture nominee earned more than $300 million in ticket sales.

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Warner Bros.

#78. Dreams

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 20,541

Director: Akira Kurosawa

Release year: 1990

Akira Kurosawa is one of the most respected directors in Japanese film history for his stunning works, which includes “Ran,” “Seven Samurai,” and “Rashomon.” One of his last films, “Dreams” is a series of eight stories (based on Kurosawa’s own recurring dreams) that delve into the fantasy world with magical realism. It was the first screenplay in nearly 50 years for which Kurosawa received sole credit.

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Castle Rock Entertainment

#77. Hamlet

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 33,079

Director: Kenneth Branagh

Release year: 1996

Kenneth Branagh devoted much of his career as both an actor and director to the works of William Shakespeare; this film version of “Hamlet” is one of his most popular productions. Playing the lead role, Branagh updated the film to the 19th century and presented the first unabridged film version of one of Shakespeare’s absolute classics, which earned him an Oscar nomination for his adaptation.

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Victor Company of Japan (JVC)

#76. Night on Earth

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 47,106

Director: Jim Jarmusch

Release year: 1991

In Jim Jarmusch’s “Night on Earth, five cities serve as the setting for five separate stories that all take place between taxi drivers and their passengers. In one of the vignettes, Winona Ryder takes a turn outside of her typical roles of the era as she plays a tomboy cab driver ferrying a Hollywood executive to the airport.

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Good Machine

#75. Happiness

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 60,303

Director: Todd Solondz

Release year: 1998

The indie film world embraced “Happiness,” despite its less-than-wholesome content. The movie details the lives of three sisters all experiencing different degrees of trouble at home, from loneliness and self-pity to a pedophile husband. Suffice to say, nobody finds happiness. Todd Solondz was nominated for Best Director at the Independent Spirit Awards for his directing.

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Twentieth Century Fox

#74. The Sandlot

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 66,942

Director: David Mickey Evans

Release year: 1993

One of the most beloved family films of the 1990s, “The Sandlot” is a tribute to the joys of baseball and its ability to bring friends together. When a new kid moves to town in 1962, he’s able to make friends with the neighborhood guys through their never-ending baseball games at a nearby park. It didn’t win any major awards or set box office records, but “The Sandlot” is an enduring classic as a sports movie as well as a coming-of-age story.

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Universal Pictures

#73. October Sky

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 71,750

Director: Joe Johnston

Release year: 1999

Based on Homer Hickam’s memoir “Rocket Boys,” this movie is about a group of boys in West Virginia who become obsessed with building rockets after seeing Sputnik orbit into space. Starring Jake Gyllenhaal as Hickam, the film’s title “October Sky” is actually an anagram for “Rocket Boys.” For huge fans of the movie, there’s a festival in Hickam’s home town of Coalwood, West Virginia that celebrates the story.

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GGR

#72. Glengarry Glen Ross

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 85,451

Director: James Foley

Release year: 1992

David Mamet’s play found its way to the big screen after winning the Pulitzer Prize and a Tony Award in 1984. Alec Baldwin, Al Pacino and Jack Lemmon star in the story of Chicago real estate agents desperate to make a sale. Pacino was nominated for both a Golden Globe and an Oscar for his performance as Ricky Roma, the best closer in the office.

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Columbia Pictures Corporation

#71. Awakenings

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 105,811

Director: Penny Marshall

Release year: 1990

Robin Williams stepped away from the comedy roles he normally played to take on the role of a doctor who used an experimental medicine in 1969 to awaken people from decades-long comas. “Awakenings” was nominated for a Best Picture Oscar; Robert De Niro, who played one of the patients, also received a nomination for Best Supporting Actor. The film was based on the memoir of the same name, released in 1973.

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Columbia Pictures Corporation

#70. Boyz n the Hood

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 106,488

Director: John Singleton

Release year: 1991

John Singleton’s debut directing effort broke new ground with this story of gang violence and the perils of living in underprivileged communities in America—specifically in South Central Los Angeles. “Boyz in the Hood” is an honest look at three friends, played by Cuba Gooding Jr., Morris Chestnut and Ice Cube (who made his film debut after first breaking out in the rap group N.W.A.). Singleton was nominated for both a Best Writing and Best Directing Oscar for his work.

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Hollywood Pictures

#69. Tombstone

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 107,959

Director: George P. Cosmatos

Release year: 1993

Kurt Russell and Val Kilmer star in this Western about real-life events that took place in Tombstone, Arizona in the late 1800s. The story tracks Russell as famous lawman Wyatt Earp, who relocates to the area to retire but runs up against the outlaws he’s always tried to bring to justice. “Wyatt Earp,” another Western about the same subject starring Kevin Costner, came out the same year (but didn’t enjoy the same box office success).

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Price Entertainment

#68. A Bronx Tale

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 110,803

Director: Robert De Niro

Release year: 1993

Robert De Niro serves as both the star and director of this 1960s mafia crime story about a father who tries to protect his teenage son when a local gangster (Chazz Palminteri) befriends the young man. Palminteri himself wrote the play the film was based on, and also adapted it for the screen.

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Twentieth Century Fox

#67. Miller's Crossing

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 113,696

Director: Joel Coen

Release year: 1990

Miller’s Crossing” is the story of a Prohibition-era Irish-Italian gang war, and the man who played both sides of the conflict. Joel and Ethan Coen wrote and directed the film, with Gabriel Byrne playing the leading man. Time Magazine named the film as one of the best 100 movies since the magazine began in 1923.

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Morgan Creek Entertainment Group

#66. The Last of the Mohicans

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 129,345

Director: Michael Mann

Release year: 1992

The source material for this film was James Fenimore Cooper’s 1826 novel about the French and Indian War in 1757. Daniel Day-Lewis stars as Hawkeye, a white man adopted by the Mohican tribe. The story tracks the tribespeople as they try to return a British girl to safety.

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Castle Rock Entertainment

#65. Misery

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 154,684

Director: Rob Reiner

Release year: 1990

Rob Reiner followed up his hit romantic comedy “When Harry Met Sally” with this Stephen King adaptation that is anything but romantic or funny. “Misery” is about an author who is rescued from a car crash by one of his biggest fans, only to discover that she’s a monster intent on keeping him prisoner. James Caan stars as the author and Kathy Bates is his captor. Bates won both the Academy Award and the Golden Globe for her acting in the film.

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Comedy Central

#64. South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 176,114

Director: Trey Parker

Release year: 1999

This self-referential animated movie is about a group of kids (familiar to fans of the Comedy Central series) who go see an R-rated movie and come home swearing up a storm—causing their parents to freak out and blame Canada. The film earned an Oscar nomination for its song “Blame Canada,” performed by comedy legend Robin Williams.

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Paramount Pictures

#63. What's Eating Gilbert Grape

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 189,342

Director: Lasse Hallström

Release year: 1993

Leonardo DiCaprio transitioned from sitcom star (“Growing Pains”) to movie star in this film about a young grocery store clerk (Johnny Depp) who has to care for his mentally ill brother (DiCaprio) and obese mother in the Midwest. DiCaprio was nominated for his first Oscar for his supporting role in the film.

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View Askew Productions

#62. Clerks

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 195,141

Director: Kevin Smith

Release year: 1994

This low-budget black-and-white comedy set in an actual convenience store made Kevin Smith one of the hottest young directing stars in the country (he also acted in the film as the mute Silent Bob). Shot for just $27,000, the film went on to gross over $3 million. There’s not much of a storyline beyond the daily lives of the two clerks (one at a convenience store, one at a video store) in suburban New Jersey, but its oddball twists and memorable lines have made it a cult favorite.

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Franchise Pictures

#61. The Boondock Saints

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 211,277

Director: Troy Duffy

Release year: 1999

Another independent film to defy expectations, “The Boondock Saints” is about Irish-American twins in Boston who team up to wipe out the city’s criminal underbelly in the name of God. Willem Dafoe played the FBI agent assigned to track the case. The film has become a major cult classic, raking in almost $50 million in home video sales.

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Twentieth Century Fox

#60. Office Space

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 218,856

Director: Mike Judge

Release year: 1999

In “Office Space,” a jaded employee decides to fight back against his oppressive corporate environment by hatching a scheme to skim money from the coffers. Ron Livingston, Jennifer Aniston and Gary Cole star in this comedy from Mike Judge (who rose to prominence for his earlier TV cartoon work with “Beavis & Butthead” and “King of the Hill”). The film (and its red-stapler-attached breakout character) is actually based on Judge’s cartoon series “Milton.”

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Warner Bros.

#59. The Fugitive

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 234,841

Director: Andrew Davis

Release year: 1993

This hugely successful drama was a remake of the 1960s TV series, which centered on a doctor accused of murder who escapes from a prison transport and goes on the run to prove his innocence. Tommy Lee Jones won the Academy Award for his role as the U.S. Marshal determined to catch Richard Kimble (Harrison Ford). The third-most-successful film of 1993, “The Fugitive” inspired a remake (“U.S. Marshals”) in 1998, in which Jones reprised his part.

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Mandalay Entertainment

#58. Donnie Brasco

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 246,952

Director: Mike Newell

Release year: 1997

Al Pacino and Johnny Depp team up in this story of an FBI informant who works for a New York crime family in the 1970s and befriends an aging hit man (Pacino). Depp plays the title character, based on a book by Joseph D. Pistone (the real-life Donnie Brasco).

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Columbia Pictures Corporation

#57. Gattaca

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 248,099

Director: Andrew Niccol

Release year: 1997

This futuristic sci-fi movie takes audiences into a world where genetics have been manipulated to produce perfect babies. Ethan Hawke plays a man born without the benefit of gene editing, and assumes another man’s identity (Jude Law) to fit into society. Space agency NASA has named “Gattaca” as the most plausible science fiction film in history.

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Astralwerks

#56. Being John Malkovich

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 278,159

Director: Spike Jonze

Release year: 1999

Being John Malkovich” is about an unemployed puppeteer played by John Cusack who finds a portal into the brain of John Malkovich, played by himself. The oddball comedic drama earned former music video director Spike Jonze an Academy Award nomination for his directing, and another nomination went to Charlie Kaufman for the script. “Malkovich?” “Malkovich Malkovich.”

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Polygram Filmed Entertainment

#55. The Game

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 297,499

Director: David Fincher

Release year: 1997

Another director who got his start in music videos, David Fincher broke into mainstream feature films with “Se7en” in 1995 and followed it up with this paranoia thriller. “The Game” is about a wealthy man who gets engrossed in a real-life mystery game that blends the lines between fiction and reality. Michael Douglas played the investment banker in the well-reviewed film that didn’t quite live up to its acclaim at the box office.

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Twentieth Century Fox

#54. Titanic

IMDb rating: 7.8

IMDb votes: 897,578

Director: James Cameron

Release year: 1997

James Cameron’s “Titanic” held the number-one spot at the box office for more than a decade until another Cameron film, “Avatar,” took over in 2009. At three hours and 14 minutes, audiences definitely got their money’s worth in this fictionalized tale of the infamous ocean liner’s 1912 demise. Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet star in the film that tallied 11 Oscar wins, including Best Picture, Best Director and a slew of technical awards.

49/
Warner Bros. Animation

#53. Batman: Mask of the Phantasm

IMDb rating: 7.9

IMDb votes: 35,669

Director: Eric Radomski

Release year: 1993

While three live-action Batman films came out in the 1990s, the only film to make the list is the animated “Batman: Mask of the Phantasm.” Born out of the animated TV series, the film follows the Caped Crusader as he’s wrongly accused of murdering a series of mafia bosses. The voice talent includes Mark Hamill as The Joker.

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Columbia Pictures Corporation

#52. The Remains of the Day

IMDb rating: 7.9

IMDb votes: 52,947

Director: James Ivory

Release year: 1993

The Remains of the Day” had Oscar written all over it, with huge British stars Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson performing in an adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Man Booker Prize-winning novel. The film tells the story in the flashbacks of a butler (Hopkins) who realizes he served a dishonorable man. Hopkins and Thompson both earned Academy Award nominations for their roles, while the film itself and director James Ivory also received nods.

51/
Touchstone Pictures

#51. The Insider

IMDb rating: 7.9

IMDb votes: 144,891

Director: Michael Mann

Release year: 1999

Based on a “60 Minutes” story, “The Insider” delves into the life of whistleblower Jeffrey Wigand and the lengths to which Big Tobacco would go to silence him. The film was a major critical success, earning seven different Oscar nominations—including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay and Best Actor for Russell Crowe’s performance in the leading role opposite Al Pacino.

52/
Touchstone Pictures

#50. Ed Wood

IMDb rating: 7.9

IMDb votes: 152,949

Director: Tim Burton

Release year: 1994

Tim Burton wowed audiences with “Batman” and “Beetlejuice” in the 1980s, and continued his run into the 90s with this 50s flashback. Johnny Depp plays a schlocky B-movie director who makes terrible movies (but believes in them deeply). Depp originally starred in “Edward Scissorhands” for Burton, and would go on to collaborate with him often.

 

53/
Universal Pictures

#49. Carlito's Way

IMDb rating: 7.9

IMDb votes: 178,626

Director: Brian De Palma

Release year: 1993

Previously teamed up on “Scarface,” Al Pacino and Brian De Palma come together again for “Carlito’s Way,” which covers similar territory. Pacino plays a Puerto Rican criminal who vows to go straight after getting freed from prison, but gets dragged back into the underworld. Sean Penn co-stars in this crime story adapted from two Judge Edwin Torres novels.

 

54/
Morgan Creek Entertainment Group

#48. True Romance

IMDb rating: 7.9

IMDb votes: 180,463

Director: Tony Scott

Release year: 1993

Before he officially burst onto the Hollywood scene, Quentin Tarantino wrote this crime-filled story of a geek, a call girl, the cocaine they steal and the mob that wants it back. Christian Slater and Patricia Arquette played the leads, while the rest of the cast is filled with huge names like Dennis Hopper, Val Kilmer, Gary Oldman, Brad Pitt and Christopher Walken.

55/
New Line Cinema

#47. Boogie Nights

IMDb rating: 7.9

IMDb votes: 210,352

Director: Paul Thomas Anderson

Release year: 1997

Mark Wahlberg officially left his Marky Mark days behind him when he starred in this epic story—the tale of a burgeoning porn star finding his way in the San Fernando Valley in the 1970s. Burt Reynolds and Julianne Moore were both nominated for Oscars, as was P.T. Anderson for his script.

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Twentieth Century Fox

#46. Edward Scissorhands

IMDb rating: 7.9

IMDb votes: 397,566

Director: Tim Burton

Release year: 1990

One of Burton’s early classics, “Edward Scissorhands” is a Grimm-style fable set in suburbia, where a scissor-handed man (created by a lonely inventor who dies before adding his final appendages) tries to find compassion and acceptance amongst the cartoonish denizens of the new world he joins. Johnny Depp played the misunderstood Edward, with Winona Ryder as his love interest. Legendary monster-maker and character artist Stan Winston handled the design of the title character.

 

57/
Walt Disney Pictures

#45. Toy Story 2

IMDb rating: 7.9

IMDb votes: 439,628

Director: John Lasseter

Release year: 1999

The sequel to Pixar’s smash hit “Toy Story” finds Woody stolen by a toy collector, sending Buzz and friends on a rescue mission to get their cowboy friend back. To date, “Toy Story 2has grossed almost $500 million worldwide at the box office—beating the original by a significant margin—but it still pales in comparison to the third edition of the franchise, which currently has more than a billion dollars in worldwide sales.

 

58/
Hollywood Pictures

#44. Blood In, Blood Out

IMDb rating: 8

IMDb votes: 25,613

Director: Taylor Hackford

Release year: 1993

Originally known as “Bound by Honor,” this movie is based on the experiences of poet/screenwriter Jimmy Santiago Baca. “Blood In, Blood Out” follows three men in Latino gangs in East Los Angeles as they move in and out of prison from the early 70s through the mid-80s. Taylor Hackford first found acclaim as the director of “An Officer and a Gentleman,” and showed his range at the helm of this radically different film.

 

59/
Asymmetrical Productions

#43. The Straight Story

IMDb rating: 8

IMDb votes: 71,438

Director: David Lynch

Release year: 1999

The Straight Story” is an unlikely road trip movie that stars Richard Farnsworth as a man who drives across Iowa and Wisconsin in a tractor. David Lynch veered away from his traditional offbeat subject matter to direct this true story of a man trying to reconnect with his sick brother. Farnsworth’s performance was nominated for an Oscar, making him the oldest Best Actor contender at 79 years old.

 

60/
Miramax

#42. Sling Blade

IMDb rating: 8

IMDb votes: 78,867

Director: Billy Bob Thornton

Release year: 1996

Billy Bob Thornton received serious praise for his role in “Sling Blade,” playing a man with developmental disabilities just released from prison for a murder he committed as a child. He earned even more accolades for the film’s script, which won the Academy Award for Best Screenplay. Country music star Dwight Yoakam made his first major acting appearance in the film as an abusive boyfriend.

61/
Warner Bros.

#41. JFK

IMDb rating: 8

IMDb votes: 125,903

Director: Oliver Stone

Release year: 1991

Rather than a straight biopic of Kennedy, Oliver Stone engages the conspiracies surrounding JFK’s death in this Kevin Costner-led film that investigates what really happened on the Grassy Knoll. The film was adapted from two different books and earned Oscar nominations in most of the major categories.

62/
Warner Bros.

#40. The Iron Giant

IMDb rating: 8

IMDb votes: 148,558

Director: Brad Bird

Release year: 1999

The third animated film on the list, “The Iron Giant” is the heartwarming tale of a boy in the late 50s who makes friends with a large robot from space and tries to hide him from government agents. Directed by Brad Bird (who would go on to be one of Pixar’s most prolific directors), the movie features the voice talents of Jennifer Aniston, Harry Connick Jr. and Vin Diesel. The film won or was nominated for just about every award at the Annies, the animation world’s version of the Oscars.

63/
Tig Productions

#39. Dances with Wolves

IMDb rating: 8

IMDb votes: 209,849

Director: Kevin Costner

Release year: 1990

The winner of seven Oscars, “Dances with Wolves” was Kevin Costner’s most celebrated foray into Civil War dramas—and as writer, producer and star, he came out a champion. In the film, Costner played a Union Army officer who travels to the frontier and becomes entwined with a Lakota Indian tribe. A good portion of the film is performed in the Lakota dialect with English subtitles.

64/
Universal Pictures

#38. Scent of a Woman

IMDb rating: 8

IMDb votes: 219,862

Director: Martin Brest

Release year: 1992

Scent of a Woman” began its life as an 1969 Italian novel called “Il Buio e Il Miele” before being adapted into a Italian film in 1974. Nearly 20 years later, Al Pacino and Chris O’Donnell starred in the American adaptation, the story of a high school student who takes a job caring for an ornery blind man (Pacino). The film earned Pacino his only Oscar (after seven previous nominations).

65/
Touchstone Pictures

#37. The Nightmare Before Christmas

IMDb rating: 8

IMDb votes: 254,053

Director: Henry Selick

Release year: 1993

The Nightmare Before Christmas” eschewed traditional two-dimensional animation in favor of stop-motion, bringing the dark tale of Jack Skellington to life. A citizen of “Halloween Town,” Skellington accidentally discovers “Christmas Town” and decides to celebrate the holiday in his own spooky way. Tim Burton came up with the original story as a poem back in 1982 as an animator for Disney.

66/
Ghoulardi Film Company

#36. Magnolia

IMDb rating: 8

IMDb votes: 261,241

Director: Paul Thomas Anderson

Release year: 1999

P.T. Anderson followed up his “Boogie Nights” success with this sprawling tale about the meaning of family amongst interconnected characters in Los Angeles’ San Fernando Valley. Tom Cruise, Julianne Moore, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Jason Robards starred in what would be the last film of Robards’ career. The film scored three Oscar nominations, including one for Cruise and another for Anderson’s screenplay.

67/
Walt Disney Pictures

#35. Aladdin

IMDb rating: 8

IMDb votes: 300,534

Director: Ron Clements

Release year: 1992

On the heels of the success of “Beauty and the Beast” (see next slide), Disney created this animated adaptation of one of the oldest stories in Arabic storytelling. “Aladdin” tells the story of a lowly street beggar who falls in love with a princess and vows to show her the world with the help of a genie in a lamp. Robin Williams voiced the hilarious genie, and the film won two different Academy Awards for its popular soundtrack.

68/
Walt Disney Pictures

#34. Beauty and the Beast

IMDb rating: 8

IMDb votes: 368,820

Director: Gary Trousdale

Release year: 1991

The first early-90s animated Disney movie to earn legions of fans was this tale (as old as time). A cursed French prince has been turned into a monster, and imprisons a bookish local girl in an attempt to regain his human form by earning her true love. Disney released a live-action adaptation of their animated classic in 2017, which was itself an adaptation of a well-known French fairytale and a 1946 French film. Alan Menken won two Oscars for his musical contributions to the film, including the title track.

69/
Columbia Pictures Corporation

#33. Groundhog Day

IMDb rating: 8

IMDb votes: 512,900

Director: Harold Ramis

Release year: 1993

This history-repeats-itself parable is about a crabby TV news reporter (Bill Murray) who is magically forced to relive Groundhog Day over and over again. Andie MacDowell co-stars and former Ghostbuster Harold Ramis both wrote and directed the movie. The film was added to the National Film Registry at the Library of Congress in 2006, and was recently turned into a Broadway musical.

70/
Atlas Entertainment

#32. Twelve Monkeys

IMDb rating: 8

IMDb votes: 523,335

Director: Terry Gilliam

Release year: 1995

Terry Gilliam amped up the paranoia in this thriller starring Bruce Willis, Madeleine Stowe and Brad Pitt. “Twelve Monkeys” is about a virus that wipes out most of humanity—and the man sent back in time to stop it. The movie was based on a 1962 short French film called “La Jetée” and has since inspired a TV series on the SyFy Network.  

71/
Hell's Kitchen Films

#31. In the Name of the Father

IMDb rating: 8.1

IMDb votes: 133,400

Director: Jim Sheridan

Release year: 1993

In the Name of the Father” focused on the real-life drama of an Irishman (Daniel Day-Lewis) falsely accused of murdering four British soldiers on behalf of the IRA. The film captivated audiences and earned a huge cache of award nominations, including seven at the Academy Awards and four at the Golden Globes. The story was taken from Gerry Conlon’s autobiographical book “Proved Innocent: The Story of Gerry Conlon of the Guildford Four.”

72/
Castle Rock Entertainment

#30. Before Sunrise

IMDb rating: 8.1

IMDb votes: 222,771

Director: Richard Linklater

Release year: 1995

Richard Linklater first hit this list at #86 with 1993’s “Dazed and Confused.” Two years later, he directed a romantic drama starring Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy about two young people who meet on a train to Vienna and spend one hopeful night together. While the plot isn’t very extensive, a sequel was made in 2004 that picked up the story nine years later (“Before Sunset”) and a third film (“Before Midnight”) had the couple reuniting again 18 years after they first met.

73/
PolyGram Filmed Entertainment

#29. Fargo

IMDb rating: 8.1

IMDb votes: 530,847

Director: Joel Coen

Release year: 1996

Another Coen Brothers hit, “Fargo” had audiences everywhere speaking in a Minnesota accent. This oddball crime story had a pregnant sheriff (played by Frances McDormand) investigating the kidnapping of a woman whose husband hired two hitmen to carry out the job. The Coens won the Oscar for Best Screenplay, and Frances McDormand won for her role as Sheriff Marge Gunderson. In 2014, FX released a TV adaptation of the film, starring Billy Bob Thornton and Martin Freeman, set in the same universe as the movie.

74/
Polygram Filmed Entertainment

#28. The Big Lebowski

IMDb rating: 8.1

IMDb votes: 624,574

Director: Joel Coen

Release year: 1998

The Coen Brothers had hit after hit in the 1990s—and one of their biggest cult classics is the story of an L.A. deadbeat known as “The Dude” who gets tangled up in a kidnapping plot. Jeff Bridges played the main character, with Steve Buscemi, John Goodman and Julianne Moore in supporting roles. The film has become such a niche classic that it has inspired college classes, a tribute festival, and numerous posters on college dorm walls.

75/
Universal Pictures

#27. Jurassic Park

IMDb rating: 8.1

IMDb votes: 730,597

Director: Steven Spielberg

Release year: 1993

The premise of “Jurassic Park” is such: with the help of DNA technology, a wealthy industrialist has brought dinosaurs back to life and opened a theme park with the dinos as the main attraction—until things go terribly wrong. Based on a Michael Crichton book, Spielberg wowed audiences with the ultra-realistic dinosaurs he was able to create thanks to Oscar-winning special effects aided by advanced computer technology. To date, the film has spawned five cinematic sequels, including the new “Jurassic World” franchise starring Chris Pratt.

76/
Paramount Pictures

#26. The Truman Show

IMDb rating: 8.1

IMDb votes: 785,131

Director: Peter Weir

Release year: 1998

What if you were the star of your own reality show, but didn’t know it? That’s the story behind “The Truman Show,” where Jim Carrey proved his dramatic acting chops as the leading man who has no idea his life has been filmed since birth. While Carrey didn’t win any awards for the part, Ed Harris was Oscar-nominated for playing the role of Christof, the creator of Truman’s world (and TV show), while director Peter Weir and screenwriter Andrew Niccol both earned Academy Award nominations for their inventive work on the movie.

77/
Hollywood Pictures

#25. The Sixth Sense

IMDb rating: 8.1

IMDb votes: 802,945

Director: M. Night Shyamalan

Release year: 1999

Writer and director M. Night Shyamalan became a hard-to-pronounce household name in 1999 with one of the greatest cinematic twist endings of all time. Bruce Willis stars as a child psychologist who tries to help a troubled young patient (Haley Joel Osment) who claims that he can see dead people. Until 2017, “The Sixth Sense” was the highest-grossing horror film of all time.

78/
Warner Bros.

#24. Unforgiven

IMDb rating: 8.2

IMDb votes: 322,281

Director: Clint Eastwood

Release year: 1992

Clint Eastwood directed himself in this western about a gunslinger who takes one last job long after retiring to become a farmer. Gene Hackman, Morgan Freeman and Richard Harris co-star with Eastwood, who won Oscars for Best Picture as well as his directing—plus as a nomination for his acting in the film. Hackman won the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor.

79/
Universal Pictures

#23. Casino

IMDb rating: 8.2

IMDb votes: 390,341

Director: Martin Scorsese

Release year: 1995

Casino” stars Robert De Niro as a Jewish casino owner in his eighth collaboration with director Martin Scorsese. The film follows De Niro’s Sam Rothstein as he spars with Mafia-made man Nicky Santoro (Joe Pesci) and falls in love with a beautiful but challenging woman played by Sharon Stone. The film was based on the non-fiction book “Casino: Love and Honor in Las Vegas” by Nicholas Pileggi, who co-wrote the screenplay with Scorsese.

80/
Warner Bros.

#22. Heat

IMDb rating: 8.2

IMDb votes: 496,343

Director: Michael Mann

Release year: 1995

Legendary actors Robert De Niro and Al Pacino go head-to-head in “Heat,” a cat-and-mouse story about professional bank robbers who accidentally leave behind a clue at their latest heist and find the cops on their tails. Jon Voight and Val Kilmer also star in the almost three-hour film that began as an unproduced television pilot by Michael Mann.

81/
Regency Enterprises

#21. L.A. Confidential

IMDb rating: 8.3

IMDb votes: 470,534

Director: Curtis Hanson

Release year: 1997

James Ellroy’s 1990 novel turned into this 1950s Hollywood crime noir story that picked up nine Oscar nominations, including a victory for Kim Basinger as Best Supporting Actress for her role as a prostitute made to look like Veronica Lake. The story follows three policemen investigating a series of murders, with corruption at every turn.

82/
Be Gentlemen Limited Partnership

#20. Good Will Hunting

IMDb rating: 8.3

IMDb votes: 718,128

Director: Gus Van Sant

Release year: 1997

America liked “dem apples” quite a bit in this story of a Boston janitor hiding a genius-level intellect. Matt Damon and Ben Affleck rocketed into stardom for their leading roles and won the Oscar for their “Good Will Hunting” screenplay. Robin Williams played a tough-but-tender psychologist and also took home an Oscar for the part.

83/
Pixar Animation Studios

#19. Toy Story

IMDb rating: 8.3

IMDb votes: 738,889

Director: John Lasseter

Release year: 1995

Now one of Pixar’s most-loved franchises, the original “Toy Story” was a box office smash in 1995 as the highest-grossing film of the year. The CGI-animated movie captivated audiences with a story of two toys, a cowboy played by Tom Hanks and a space hero played by Tim Allen, who vie for the attention of the boy who owns them.

84/
Live Entertainment

#18. Reservoir Dogs

IMDb rating: 8.3

IMDb votes: 776,219

Director: Quentin Tarantino

Release year: 1992

Writer and director Quentin Tarantino wasn’t even 30 years old when he made “Reservoir Dogs,” an indie crime film about a squad of suit-clad criminals who deal with a crime gone wrong. The film’s success helped move American filmmaking away from the iron grip of movie studios and more towards independent productions.

85/
Icon Entertainment International

#17. Braveheart

IMDb rating: 8.4

IMDb votes: 848,591

Director: Mel Gibson

Release year: 1995

Mel Gibson did double-duty as both the star and director of “Braveheart,” the Academy Award-winner for Best Picture (along with nine other nominations). Gibson played William Wallace, a Scottish clansman who leads an insurrection against the British for Scottish independence in the late 1200s. The film was based on the epic poem “The Actes and Deidis of the Illustre and Vallyeant Campioun Schir William Wallace,” also known more simply as “The Wallace.”

86/
DreamWorks

#16. American Beauty

IMDb rating: 8.4

IMDb votes: 943,462

Director: Sam Mendes

Release year: 1999

American Beauty” racked up five Oscar wins at the 72nd Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay and Best Actor in a Leading Role for Kevin Spacey. He plays Lester Burnham, a sexually repressed suburbanite who falls in love with one of his daughter’s underage friends, while his wife cheats on him and his daughter explores her own nascent sexuality. It was director Sam Mendes’ feature film debut after first finding fans as a theatre director.

87/
Walt Disney Pictures

#15. The Lion King

IMDb rating: 8.5

IMDb votes: 771,732

Director: Roger Allers

Release year: 1994

The highest-ranking animated film on this list, “The Lion King” was so beloved that it became a long-running hit Broadway musical and is now being turned into a live-action movie starring Beyoncé. The story follows Simba, a lion cub set to inherit the throne as King of the Jungle—until he runs away after being made to believe he caused his father’s death. Matthew Broderick, Whoopi Goldberg, Nathan Lane, Jeremy Irons and James Earl Jones all provided voices for an all-star cast.

88/
Carolco Pictures

#14. Terminator 2

IMDb rating: 8.5

IMDb votes: 855,082

Director: James Cameron

Release year: 1991

Before his record-setting box office totals on Titanic, James Cameron directed the sequel to his 1984 hit “Terminator.” Arnold Schwarzenegger returns to his role as a robot sent from the future to defend a teenage boy who will grow up to become a central figure in the fight against sentient artificial intelligence. Although the film’s budget was more than a million dollars, it still went on to make five times that amount worldwide.

89/
New Line Cinema

#13. American History X

IMDb rating: 8.5

IMDb votes: 900,257

Director: Tony Kaye

Release year: 1998

Edward Norton stars as a former neo-Nazi skinhead released from prison after he serves time for the murder of a black man. The man realizes the errors of his hateful ways as he tries to pull his brother away from making the same mistakes. Director Tony Kaye chose to shoot the film’s flashback scenes in black-and-white, a visual metaphor on the racial harmony message of the film.

90/
Castle Rock Entertainment

#12. The Green Mile

IMDb rating: 8.5

IMDb votes: 937,108

Director: Frank Darabont

Release year: 1999

Tom Hanks continues his run as one of the biggest stars of the era in this 1930s story of a mentally challenged man with curious powers on Death Row in Louisiana. “The Green Mile” stars Hanks as a prison guard, and introduces Michael Clarke Duncan, who received an Oscar nomination for the role of the central prisoner. The story was originally written as a 1996 novel by Stephen King.

91/
PolyGram Filmed Entertainment

#11. The Usual Suspects

IMDb rating: 8.6

IMDb votes: 855,410

Director: Bryan Singer

Release year: 1995

Bryan Singer would go on to direct the “X-Men” franchise and other big budget fare, but his first major motion picture was “The Usual Suspects.” This enthralling whodunit follows a mysterious gangster who brings a motley crew of criminals into his orbit, and an ensuing police investigation of a ship full of murders. The gangster earned a spot as one of AFI’s top movie villains; Oscars went to Kevin Spacey and screenwriter Christopher McQuarrie, who would re-team with childhood friend Singer regularly throughout their careers.

92/
DreamWorks

#10. Saving Private Ryan

IMDb rating: 8.6

IMDb votes: 1,035,778

Director: Steven Spielberg

Release year: 1998

This epic war movie earned Spielberg his second Academy Award as Best Director. It depicts the story of an Army crew tasked with tracking down the last remaining brother in a family of soldiers who lost their lives in World War II. Tom Hanks stars alongside a mostly younger cast, including Matt Damon as Private Ryan.

93/
Strong Heart/Demme Production

#9. The Silence of the Lambs

IMDb rating: 8.6

IMDb votes: 1,051,620

Director: Jonathan Demme

Release year: 1991

In 1992, “The Silence of the Lambsdominated the Oscars, with awards in most of the major categories: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay and Best Actor and Actress. Jodie Foster stars as a FBI agent-in-training assigned to interrogate a cannibal serial killer (Anthony Hopkins), who claims to have information about a murderer still at large. This is the second cinematic appearance of Hopkins’ character Dr. Hannibal Lecter; he originally appeared in the Thomas Harris book “Red Dragon,” which was turned into a 1986 film “Manhunter” with Brian Cox playing the murderous doctor.

94/
Cecchi Gori Pictures

#8. Se7en

IMDb rating: 8.6

IMDb votes: 1,199,907

Director: David Fincher

Release year: 1995

Another dark crime story to rise to the top of this list, “Se7en” focuses on two detectives (Brad Pitt and Morgan Freeman) tracking down a serial killer who uses the seven deadly sins as the inspiration for his murder scenes. The film was director David Fincher’s first feature after building his career on big-budget commercials and music videos. Gwyneth Paltrow co-stars in one of her first major film roles.

95/
Warner Bros. Entertainment

#7. Goodfellas

IMDb rating: 8.7

IMDb votes: 847,887

Director: Martin Scorsese

Release year: 1990

Scorsese was already a household name when “Goodfellas” was released in 1990, but the mafia film marked the first time he was nominated for Academy Awards in both directing and screenwriting. “Goodfellas” is the first collaboration between Scorsese and Nicholas Pileggi, who wrote the novel on which the movie was based (the second collaboration was “Casino,” which hit #23 on this list). The movie tells the story of Henry Hill (Ray Liotta), a high school kid in New York who starts working for the mob in 1955, moving up the ladder until he joins the Witness Protection Program in the 1980s. Lorraine Bracco, Joe Pesci and Robert De Niro also star in the film.

96/
Warner Bros.

#6. The Matrix

IMDb rating: 8.7

IMDb votes: 1,412,114

Director: Lana Wachowski

Release year: 1999

In “The Matrix,” Keanu Reeves stars as a young hacker drawn into a dramatically different world, discovering that his own reality is a false construction. He joins the rebel underground to fight the people imposing that reality, which leads to amazing fight sequences that earned the film four Academy Awards. The Wachowski siblings wrote and directed the film, which led to two different sequels—the first of which became the highest-grossing R-rated movie in history.

97/
Paramount Pictures

#5. Forrest Gump

IMDb rating: 8.8

IMDb votes: 1,492,972

Director: Robert Zemeckis

Release year: 1994

Best Picture-winnerForrest Gump” is the story of a simple man who finds himself at the center of some of the 20th century’s biggest moments. Based on a book by Winston Groom, Tom Hanks earned an Oscar for his starring role in the film as Gump, performing alongside Sally Field, Robin Wright and Gary Sinise. AFI named it the 76th best American film of all time.

98/
Fox 2000 Pictures

#4. Fight Club

IMDb rating: 8.8

IMDb votes: 1,574,844

Director: David Fincher

Release year: 1999

The film adaptation of Chuck Palahniuk's hit novel brought Edward Norton and Brad Pitt to the big screen as partners in a men’s empowerment movement that involves bare-knuckle fighting in basement fight clubs. Rolling Stone named the movie its fifth-best film of the 1990s.

99/
Universal Pictures

#3. Schindler's List

IMDb rating: 8.9

IMDb votes: 1,013,668

Director: Steven Spielberg

Release year: 1993

AFI named it the eighth-best movie in history and Oscar voters agreed, bestowing a Best Picture award to “Schindler’s List” along with six additional statues. The sad but heroic story follows German industrialist Oskar Schindler, who does his best to help save the lives of his Jewish workforce in the Holocaust. The film was shot in black-and-white with the rare exception of a single girl depicted in color.

100/
Miramax

#2. Pulp Fiction

IMDb rating: 8.9

IMDb votes: 1,536,259

Director: Quentin Tarantino

Release year: 1994

Quentin Tarantino hit mainstream popularity with this scattered melange of Los Angeles crime stories starring John Travolta, Samuel L. Jackson, Uma Thurman and Bruce Willis. The film earned Tarantino the Academy Award for Best Screenplay and tallied six more nominations, including Best Picture, Best Director and acting nods for Travolta, Thurman and Jackson. The paltry $8 million dollar budget yielded massive dividends as the movie soared to more than $200 million worldwide in box office receipts.

101/
Castle Rock Entertainment

#1. The Shawshank Redemption

IMDb rating: 9.3

IMDb votes: 1,965,005

Director: Frank Darabont

Release year: 1994

In 1982, Stephen King wrote a novella entitled “Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption.” Twelve years later, it became a massive hit movie, starring Tim Robbins and Morgan Freeman as an unlikely set of best friends enduring life in a Maine prison. The film garnered seven Oscar nominations, but its popularity only increased after its initial release. In 2013 alone, the film played on cable TV for more than 150 hours and is now one of Warner Brothers’ most valuable properties.

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