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Ranking every quarterback performance in Super Bowl history

  • 1/ Alamy

    Ranking every quarterback performance in Super Bowl history

    When Super Bowl LII kicks off on Sunday, the game will pit two quarterbacks — Tom Brady and Nick Foles — whose paths to the big game couldn’t be much more different. Brady is a five-time champion who’s arguably the greatest to ever play the position, while Foles has made just four starts over the last two years and was forced into action only after Carson Wentz was knocked out for the season in Week 14.

    But legacies are forged in the biggest moments, and on the game’s biggest stage, Foles has the chance of a lifetime to etch his name into football lore.

    A look back at some of the best (and worst) quarterback performances in Super Bowl history paints an interesting picture. For as many out-of-nowhere great performances — like Doug Williams in Super Bowl XXII — there are several more stinkers from big names. With this in mind, Stacker has tracked every quarterback’s passer rating in each Super Bowl and ranked them all from worst to best. To qualify for inclusion, a player had to attempt at least 10 passes.

    Unsurprisingly, good quarterback play correlated strongly with winning teams. Of the 16 highest passer ratings in Super Bowl history, 15 of those players came out with the victory. The lone exception? Matt Ryan in Super Bowl LI. While Foles is making his first appearance in the Super Bowl, Brady appears seven times on our list. Brady’s been extremely consistent, if unspectacular, in his Super Bowl appearances — each of his passer ratings rank between No. 22 and No. 53. By this metric, he’s never had a truly incredible, top-20th percentile game, but he’s also never had a bad one either. And that’s more than can be said about the majority of the 103 following names.

    Note: The NFL’s passer rating runs from a scale of 0 to 158.3. Ties were broken by number of pass attempts

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    #103.  Craig Morton, Denver Broncos

    Super Bowl XII: Dallas Cowboys 27, Denver Broncos 10

    Passer rating: 0.0

    Passing stats: 4-for-15, 39 yards, 0 TD/4 INT

    From a passer rating perspective, it literally couldn’t have gone worse in what was a nightmare of a game for Morton. The Cowboys intercepted him four times in the first half, and he was eventually replaced by backup Norris Weese (more on him later).

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    #102. Kerry Collins, New York Giants

    Super Bowl XXXV: Baltimore Ravens 34, New York Giants 7

    Passer rating: 7.1

    Passing stats: 15-for-39, 112 yards, 0 TD/4 INT

    Against the vaunted Ravens defense, which is considered among the greatest of all time, Collins proved to be no match. On top of tossing four interceptions, he was also sacked four times. The Giants were forced to punt 11 times during the game, the most in Super Bowl history.

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    #101. Earl Morrall, Baltimore Colts

    Super Bowl III: New York Jets 16, Baltimore Colts 7

    Passer rating: 9.3

    Passing stats: 6-for-17, 71 yards, 0 TD/3 INT

    In the first game to be officially dubbed “Super Bowl” — the first two iterations were known as the AFL-NFL World Championship Game and retroactively renamed — Morrall and the Colts went down to Joe Namath and the Jets in one of the biggest upsets in NFL history. Morrall led the league with a 92.3 passer rating during the regular season and won the league’s MVP award, yet could not get anything going against the Jets’ defense. Morrall was eventually replaced in the game by Unitas, who didn’t fare much better.

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    #100. Fran Tarkenton, Minnesota Vikings

    Super Bowl IX: Pittsburgh Steelers 16, Minnesota Vikings 6

    Passer rating: 14.1

    Passing stats: 11-for-26, 102 yards, 0 TD/3 INT

    Tarkenton’s play in Super Bowl IX goes to show that even Hall of Famers (many of them, as we’ll see) can have stinkers on the biggest stage. The Vikings couldn’t keep up with the Steelers in what was Pittsburgh’s first of four Super Bowl titles under Hall of Fame coach Chuck Noll. Tarkenton led Minnesota to three Super Bowls in four years from 1973 to 1976, but the team lost each game.

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    #99. John Elway, Denver Broncos

     Super Bowl XXIV: San Francisco 49ers 55, Denver Broncos 10

    Passer rating: 19.4

    Passing stats: 10-for-26, 108 yards, 0 TD/2 INT

    Three of Elway’s five Super Bowl appearances resulted in sub-60 passer ratings, with Super Bowl XXIV ranking the worst of the bunch. He was sacked four times in a blowout win for San Francisco, netting Hall of Famer Joe Montana his fourth and final championship.

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    #98. Billy Kilmer, Washington Redskins

    Super Bowl VII: Miami Dolphins 14, Washington Redskins 7

    Passer rating: 19.6

    Passing stats: 14-for-28, 104 yards, 0 TD/3 INT

    In the lowest-scoring Super Bowl ever, the Redskins could have used just a little bit more from Kilmer. Kilmer led the league in passer rating (84.8) and touchdown passes (19) during the regular season, but had three turnovers in the game and couldn’t engineer a single scoring drive, as Washington’s lone touchdown came on a fumble recovery.

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    #97. Ben Roethlisberger, Pittsburgh Steelers

    Super Bowl XL: Pittsburgh Steelers 21, Seattle Seahawks 10

    Passer rating: 22.6

    Passing stats: 9-for-21, 123 yards, 0 TD/2 INT

    With his first of (so far) two Super Bowl titles, Roethlisberger has posted the worst passer rating ever for a winning quarterback. The Steelers defense shut down Shaun Alexander and the rest of the Seattle offense, while Pittsburgh’s lone touchdown pass was thrown by receiver Antwaan Randle El on a trick play in the fourth quarter that essentially clinched the victory — though Big Ben does throw on nice block on the play.

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    #96. Craig Morton, Dallas Cowboys

    Super Bowl V: Baltimore Colts 16, Dallas Cowboys 13

    Passer rating: 34.1

    Passing stats: 12-for-26, 127 yards, 1 TD/3 INT

    Morton’s two career Super Bowl appearances were both forgettable ones. During the regular season, Morton jockeyed with Roger Staubach, who was then in his second NFL season. Staubach threw two touchdowns and eight interceptions on the year, though perhaps Cowboys head coach Tom Landry should have made a switch during Super Bowl V, as Morton was unable to lead Dallas past a Colts team that was without Johnny Unitas for most of the game due to injury.

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    #95. John Elway, Denver Broncos

    Super Bowl XXII: Washington Redskins 42, Denver Broncos 10

    Passer rating: 36.8

    Passing stats: 14-for-38, 257 yards, 1 TD/3 INT

    The Broncos were blown out in their second trip to the Super Bowl under Elway, who was sacked five times by Washington’s defense. The three interceptions were the most Elway threw in his five Super Bowl appearances.

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    #94. Johnny Unitas, Baltimore Colts

    Super Bowl III: New York Jets 16, Baltimore Colts 7

    Passer rating: 42.0

    Passing stats: 11-for-24, 110 yards, 0 TD/1 INT

    Unitas actually made two Super Bowl appearance during his career, though he only attempted nine passes in Super Bowl V before leaving due to injury, posting a 68.1 passer rating. Unitas came off the bench in Super Bowl III after starter Earl Morrall struggled to start the game, but couldn’t do enough to engineer a Baltimore comeback against the upset-minded Jets.

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    #93. Jim Kelly, Buffalo Bills

    Super Bowl XXVI: Washington Redskins 37, Buffalo Bills 24

    Passer rating: 44.8

    Passing stats: 28-for-58, 275 yards, 2 TD/4 INT

    In the second of four consecutive Super Bowl appearances by the Bills, Kelly tossed four interceptions with a then-Super Bowl record 58 pass attempts. Buffalo fell behind 24-0 early in the third quarter, a major factor in the team’s pass-heavy attack. Kelly threw an interception in each quarter, including one on the first play of the second half.

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    #92. Joe Theismann, Washington Redskins

    Super Bowl XVIII: Los Angeles Raiders 38, Washington Redskins 9

    Passer rating: 45.3

    Passing stats: 16-for-35, 243 yards, 0 TD/2 INT

    It was a rough night for Theismann, whose Redskins were blown out by Marcus Allen and the Raiders. In addition to posting a sub-50 passer rating, Theismann was sacked six times — a Super Bowl record that has since been tied.

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    #91. Boomer Esiason, Cincinnati Bengals

    Super Bowl XXIII: San Francisco 49ers 20, Cincinnati Bengals 16

    Passer rating: 46.1

    Passing stats: 11-for-25, 144 yards, 0 TD/1 INT

    The Bengals were outgained 452-244 in this game but hung around thanks to two San Francisco turnovers and a 93-yard kickoff return touchdown by Stanford Jennings. Cincinnati actually led 13-6 heading into the third quarter and took a 16-13 lead with just over three minutes remaining, but the 49ers subsequently drove 92 yards and scored the game-winning touchdown with 34 seconds remaining.

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    #90. Drew Bledsoe, New England Patriots

    Super Bowl XXXI: Green Bay Packers 35, New England Patriots 21

    Passer rating: 46.6

    Passing stats: 25-for-48, 253 yards, 2 TD/4 INT

    Bledsoe threw two interceptions in the first half that led to 10 points for Green Bay. Trailing by 13 points at halftime, New England cut the lead to 27-21 late in the third quarter. But Desmond Howard’s 99-yard touchdown return on the ensuing kickoff, combined with Bledsoe’s two fourth-quarter interceptions, squelched any hopes for a Patriots comeback.

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    #89. Chris Chandler, Atlanta Falcons

    Super Bowl XXXIII: Denver Broncos 34, Atlanta Falcons 19

    Passer rating: 47.2

    Passing stats: 19-for-35, 219 yards, 1 TD/3 INT

    The Falcons’ offense could not do anything against Denver’s defense for most of the game, as the Broncos led 17-6 at halftime before eventually extending the lead to 31-6 early in the fourth quarter. Atlanta’s lone offensive touchdown didn’t come until 2:04 left in the game.

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    #88. Norris Weese, Denver Broncos

    Super Bowl XII: Dallas Cowboys 27, Denver Broncos 10

    Passer rating: 47.9

    Passing stats: 4-for-10, 22 yards, 0 TD/0 INT

    Weese was forced into action during Super Bowl XII after Denver’s starter, Craig Morton, threw four interceptions in the first half. Weese entered the game late in the third quarter and led the Broncos into the end zone to cut the Dallas lead to 20-10, but his lost fumble in the fourth quarter essentially ended any hopes of a comeback.

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    #87. Rich Gannon, Oakland Raiders

    Super Bowl XXXVII: Tampa Bay Buccaneers 48, Oakland Raiders 21

    Passer rating: 48.9

    Passing stats: 24-for-44, 272 yards, 2 TD/5 INT

    Tampa Bay’s vaunted defense — which featured five All-Pro selections — dominated Oakland all night. Gannon, who won MVP award for his stellar regular season, was sacked five times and threw a Super Bowl record five interceptions — three of which were returned for touchdowns.

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    #86. Ron Jaworski, Philadelphia Eagles

     Super Bowl XV: Oakland Raiders 27, Philadelphia Eagles 10

    Passer rating: 49.3

    Passing stats: 18-for-38, 291 yards, 1 TD/3 INT

    Jaworski made the Pro Bowl in 1980, but he and the Eagles offense was stymied by Oakland’s defense. It took until early in the fourth quarter for Philadelphia to find the end zone, but the team was undone by Jaworski’s four turnovers (three interceptions and one fumble).

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    #85. David Woodley, Miami Dolphins

    Super Bowl XVII: Washington Redskins 27, Miami Dolphins 17

    Passer rating: 50.0

    Passing stats: 4-for-14, 97 yards, 1 TD/1 INT

    Despite Woodley’s miserable game, the Dolphins actually led 17-13 heading into the fourth quarter. But Miami was held scoreless after halftime, punting five times with an interception and a turnover on downs. Woodley was completely shut down in the second half, going 0-for-7 on pass attempts with an interception after completing 4 of 6 passes in the first half.

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    #84.  Neil O’Donnell, Pittsburgh Steelers

    Super Bowl XXX: Dallas Cowboys 27, Pittsburgh Steelers 17

    Passer rating: 51.3

    Passing stats: 28-for-49, 239 yards, 1 TD/3 INT

    Pittsburgh trailed 20-7 entering the fourth quarter but cut the lead to 20-17 with under seven minutes to play. After a Cowboys punt, O’Donnell and the offense took over with 4:15 remaining and a chance to tie or win the game, but O’Donnell threw an interception on the second play of the drive. Dallas scored a touchdown two plays later, effectively ending the game.

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    #83. Bob Griese, Miami Dolphins

    Super Bowl VI: Dallas Cowboys 24, Miami Dolphins 3

    Passer rating: 51.7

    Passing stats: 12-for-23, 134 yards, 0 TD/1 INT

    First, a caveat about Griese in the Super Bowl — he led the Dolphins to three consecutive Super Bowls, but only appears on this list twice. That’s because he attempted just seven passes — disqualifying him for this list — in Miami’s 24-7 win in Super Bowl VIII, completing six of them for 73 yards and a 110.3 passer rating. He didn’t have much success against Dallas in Super Bowl VI — during which the Dolphins scored the fewest points by a team in Super Bowl history — but his performance two years later is still worth mentioning.

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    #82. John Elway, Denver Broncos

    Super Bowl XXXII: Denver Broncos 31, Green Bay Packers 24

    Passer rating: 51.9

    Passing stats: 12-for-22, 123 yards, 0 TD/1 INT

    This is Elway’s third Super Bowl performance to appear thus far, though this one comes in a Broncos victory. Elway didn’t throw a touchdown pass, and Denver’s offense was carried by running back Terrell Davis’ 157 rushing yards and three touchdowns. But Elway did complete a crucial 23-yard pass to Howard Griffith that set up Davis’ eventual game-winning score two plays later, sealing Elway’s first of two titles.

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    #81. Joe Kapp, Minnesota Vikings

    Super Bowl IV: Kansas City Chiefs 23, Minnesota Vikings 7

    Passer rating: 52.6

    Passing stats: 16-for-25, 183 yards, 0 TD/2 INT

    It was a sloppy game for Minnesota, which turned the ball over five times with six penalties and three sacks allowed. Kapp was eventually pulled during the fourth quarter after fumbling, though the ball was recovered by the Vikings. He was replaced by Gary Cuozzo, who threw an interception on his third pass attempt.

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    #80. Fran Tarkenton, Minnesota Vikings

    Super Bowl XI: Oakland Raiders 32, Minnesota Vikings 14

    Passer rating: 52.7

    Passing stats: 17-for-35, 205 yards, 1 TD/2 INT

    For the third time in four seasons, Tarkenton led the Vikings to the Super Bowl. And for the third time, Minnesota came up short. Super Bowl XI was the only one of the three in which the team cracked double digits, but it was also the its largest margin of defeat. To date, the Vikings have not made another Super Bowl.

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    #79. Earl Morrall, Baltimore Colts

    Super Bowl V: Baltimore Colts 16, Dallas Cowboys 13

    Passer rating: 54.0

    Passing stats: 7-for-15, 147 yards, 0 TD/1 INT

    Morrall entered the game in relief of Johnny Unitas, who exited in the second quarter with a rib injury. Though his stats don’t jump off the screen, Morrall was able to lead Baltimore to a come-from-behind win, having come into the game with the Colts trailing 13-6.

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    #78. Cam Newton, Carolina Panthers

    Super Bowl 50: Denver Broncos 24, Carolina Panthers 10

    Passer rating: 55.4

    Passing stats: 18-for-41, 265 yards, 0 TD/1 INT

    The Panthers averaged a league-high 31.3 points per game during the regular season, as Newton won the MVP award, but were stifled by the Denver defense, which sacked Newton a Super Bowl record-tying six times. Newton rushed for a team-high 45 yards on six attempts, but also lost two fumbles, including one that was recovered in the end zone by Denver’s Malik Jackson.

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    #77. Stan Humphries, San Diego Chargers

    Super Bowl XXIX: San Francisco 49ers 49, San Diego Chargers 26

    Passer rating: 56.1

    Passing stats: 24-for-49, 275 yards, 1 TD/2 INT

    Humphries and the Chargers offense were no match for the 49ers, who outgained San Diego 455-354. Two interceptions by Humphries — and one by backup Gale Gilbert — didn’t help the cause.

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    #76. Peyton Manning, Denver Broncos

    Super Bowl 50: Denver Broncos 24, Carolina Panthers 10

    Passer rating: 56.6

    Passing stats: 13-for-23, 141 yards, 0 TD/1 INT

    Manning’s final NFL game wasn’t one for the highlight reel. As the Denver defense terrorized the Panthers’ Cam Newton and staked the Broncos to a lead, Manning wasn’t asked to do much through the air. But he did enough to keep Denver ahead and ride off into retirement on top.

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    #75. Steve Grogan, New England Patriots

    Super Bowl XX: Chicago Bears 46, New England Patriots 10

    Passer rating: 57.1

    Passing stats: 17-for-30, 177 yards, 1 TD/2 INT

    After the Bears fumbled on their opening possession, the Patriots and starting quarterback Tony Eason took over at the Chicago 19-yard line. New England gained zero yards but kicked a field goal to take a 3-0 lead. The Bears went on to score the game’s next 44 points in one of the biggest blowouts in Super Bowl history. Eason was replaced by Grogan in the second quarter, after Eason went 0-for-6 with a lost fumble. Given the circumstances, Grogan performed adequately, but there was nothing he or any Patriot could do to deny the Bears their first-ever Super Bowl title.

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    #74. Frank Reich, Buffalo Bills

    Super Bowl XXVII: Dallas Cowboys 52, Buffalo Bills 17

    Passer rating: 60.4

    Passing stats: 18-for-31, 194 yards, 1 TD/2 INT

    Reich replaced an injured Jim Kelly in the second quarter and held his own for a bit, eventually cutting the Cowboys lead to 31-17 after three quarters. But the Bills were undone by a Super Bowl record nine (!!) turnovers, including four by Reich (two interceptions and two fumbles), in one of the most lopsided Super Bowls ever.

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    #73. Dan Marino, Miami Dolphins

    Super Bowl XIX: San Francisco 49ers 38, Miami Dolphins 16

    Passer rating: 66.9

    Passing stats: 29-for-50, 318 yards, 1 TD/2 INT

    In his lone Super Bowl appearance, Marino led the Dolphins to a 10-7 lead after one quarter, but the team was shut out in the second half. At the time, Marino’s 50 pass attempts were a Super Bowl record, and the mark is currently tied for fourth-most all time.

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    #72. Jim Kelly, Buffalo Bills

    Super Bowl XXVIII: Dallas Cowboys 30, Buffalo Bills 13

    Passer rating: 67.1

    Passing stats: 31-for-50, 260 yards, 0 TD/1 INT

    In their fourth consecutive trip to the Super Bowl, the Bills led 13-6 at halftime, 30 minutes from finally claiming the Lombardi Trophy. But the Cowboys outscored Buffalo 24-0 in the second half, including a touchdown following a fourth-quarter Kelly interception that gave Dallas a 14-point lead.

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    #71. Matt Hasselbeck, Seattle Seahawks

    Super Bowl XL: Pittsburgh Steelers 21, Seattle Seahawks 10

    Passer rating: 67.8

    Passing stats: 26-for-49, 273 yards, 1 TD/1 INT

    In a game marked by defense, Hasselbeck actually outperformed his Steelers counterpart Ben Roethlisberger, with a 67.8 to 22.6 advantage in passer rating. Seattle outgained Pittsburgh, 396-339, but were undone by penalties and consistently failing to convert on third downs.

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    #70. Fran Tarkenton, Minnesota Vikings

    Super Bowl VIII: Miami Dolphins 24, Minnesota Vikings 7

    Passer rating: 67.9

    Passing stats: 18-for-28, 182 yards, 0 TD/1 INT

    Tarkenton’s first of three trips to the Super Bowl was, statistically speaking, his most successful. He completed 64 percent of his passes, compared to a combined 45.6 percent in his other two Super Bowls. The Vikings were held in check by Miami’s defense, though, failing to score until the fourth quarter while trailing 24-0.

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    #69. Rex Grossman, Chicago Bears

    Super Bowl XLI: Indianapolis Colts 29, Chicago Bears 17

    Passer rating: 68.3

    Passing stats: 20-for-28, 165 yards, 1 TD/1 INT

    The Bears were carried to the Super Bowl by their stout defense, as Grossman ranked 24th during the regular season in passer rating (73.9). He actually performed fairly well in this game, completing 71.4 percent of his passes — at the time the sixth-best mark in Super Bowl history. But his 3.39 adjusted yards per attempt ranks 13th-worst of all time, and he was unable to keep up with Peyton Manning and the Colts.

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    #68. Vince Ferragamo, Los Angeles Rams

    Super Bowl XIV: Pittsburgh Steelers 31, Los Angeles Rams 19

    Passer rating: 70.7

    Passing stats: 15-for-25, 212 yards, 0 TD/1 INT

    The Rams actually led the Steelers, 19-17, after three quarters before their offense stalled. Ferragamo went 5-for-10 in the final period, including a crucial interception with under six minutes left and the Rams trailing by five. Pittsburgh scored a touchdown eight plays later to seal the victory.

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    #67. Daryle Lamonica, Oakland Raiders

    Super Bowl II: Green Bay Packers 33, Oakland Raiders 14

    Passer rating: 71.7

    Passing stats: 15-for-34, 208 yards, 2 TD/1 INT

    Lamonica and the Raiders offense could only muster one score through three quarters — a 23-yard pass to Bill Miller in the second quarter that cut Green Bay’s lead to 13-7. But the Packers scored the next 20 points to win the game going away.

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    #66. Peyton Manning, Denver Broncos

    Super Bowl XLVIII: Seattle Seahawks 43, Denver Broncos 8

    Passer rating: 73.5

    Passing stats: 34-for-49, 280 yards, 1 TD/2 INT

    Manning’s subpar-yet-not-terrible 73.5 passer rating in this game was largely made up of empty calories, as the Seahawks put the game away almost immediately. On the game’s first play, Denver center Manny Ramirez snapped the ball over Manning’s head, resulting in a safety. Seattle led 22-0 at halftime and eventually led 36-0 before Manning tossed a touchdown pass to Demaryius Thomas. Manning’s 49 pass attempts were his most in any of his four Super Bowls.

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    #65. Joe Theismann, Washington Redskins

    Super Bowl XVII: Washington Redskins 27, Miami Dolphins 17

    Passer rating: 75.1

    Passing stats: 15-for-23, 143 yards, 2 TD/2 INT

    Theismann wasn’t spectacular in this game by any means, but he was leaps and bounds better than his Dolphins counterpart, David Woodley, who was 4-for-14 for 97 yards. Theismann tossed a 6-yard touchdown pass to Charlie Brown with 1:55 remaining in the game to give Washington a 27-17 lead and clinch the win.

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    #64. Donovan McNabb, Philadelphia Eagles

    Super Bowl XXXIX: New England Patriots 24, Philadelphia Eagles 21

    Passer rating: 75.4

    Passing stats: 30-for-51, 357 yards, 3 TD/3 INT

    The Eagles outgained the Patriots, 369-331, in this game, yet were undone by four turnovers, including McNabb’s three interceptions. McNabb threw a 30-yard touchdown pass to Greg Lewis with 1:48 left in the game, cutting the New England lead to three, but the Eagles couldn’t get any closer than that.

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    #63. Troy Aikman, Dallas Cowboys

    Super Bowl XXVIII: Dallas Cowboys 30, Buffalo Bills 13

    Passer rating: 77.2

    Passing stats: 19-for-27, 207 yards, 0 TD/1 INT

    In three trips to the Super Bowl, Aikman turned in two excellent games and one subpar one. Super Bowl XXVIII was the latter, though all three were wins. Aikman failed to throw a touchdown in this game, but Emmitt Smith rushed for 132 yards and two scores to pace Dallas’ offense.

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    #62. Ben Roethlisberger, Pittsburgh Steelers

    Super Bowl XLV: Green Bay Packers 31, Pittsburgh Steelers 25

    Passer rating: 77.4

    Passing stats: 25-for-40, 263 yards, 2 TD/2 INT

    Roethlisberger’s third career Super Bowl is the only one he’s lost, as he was outdueled by Green Bay’s Aaron Rodgers. Pittsburgh got the ball back with 2:07 left trailing, 31-25, but were turned over on downs after Roethlisberger threw three straight incompletions.

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    #61. Roger Staubach, Dallas Cowboys

    Super Bowl X: Pittsburgh Steelers 21, Dallas Cowboys 17

    Passer rating: 77.8

    Passing stats: 15-for-24, 204 yards, 2 TD/3 INT

    In his four Super Bowls, this was Staubach’s worst from a statistical standpoint. He threw three interceptions against Pittsburgh’s “Steel Curtain” defense, compared to just one in his other three Super Bowls combined. Dallas actually led this game, 10-7, heading into the fourth quarter before allowing 14 unanswered points. The Cowboys scored with 1:48 left to cut the lead to 21-17 but could not get any closer.

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    #60. Steve McNair, Tennessee Titans

    Super Bowl XXXIV: St. Louis Rams 23, Tennessee Titans 16

    Passer rating: 77.8

    Passing stats: 22-for-36, 214 yards, 0 TD/0 INT

    In one of the most dramatic Super Bowl endings ever, the Titans came up just short on what could have been a game-tying touchdown on the game’s final play. McNair and the Titans offense were able to play keep-away from the Rams, possessing the ball for over 36 minutes, but it wasn’t enough to top the “Greatest Show on Turf.”

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    #59. Kurt Warner, St. Louis Rams

    Super Bowl XXXVI: New England Patriots 20, St. Louis Rams 17

    Passer rating: 78.3

    Passing stats: 28-for-44, 365 yards, 1 TD/2 INT

    The Rams entered Super Bowl XXXVI as two-touchdown favorites and outgained New England, 427-267, but were hindered by three turnovers and a missed field goal. Warner racked up plenty of yards through the air but only found the end zone once on a 26-yard pass to Ricky Proehl that tied the game with 1:30 left in the fourth quarter. But the Patriots drove down and made a 48-yard field goal as time expired to pull off the upset.

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    #58. Brad Johnson, Tampa Bay Buccaneers

    Super Bowl XXXVII: Tampa Bay Buccaneers 48, Oakland Raiders 21

    Passer rating: 79.9

    Passing stats: 18-for-34, 215 yards, 2 TD/1 INT

    Johnson’s stat line is perfectly fine, but he needed to do very little for the Bucs to win this game, as Tampa Bay’s defense scored three touchdowns on interceptions. Johnson’s first touchdown pass at the end of the first half gave Tampa Bay a 20-3 lead, and his next one midway through the third quarter made the score 27-3 and all but sealed the victory.

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    #57. Trent Dilfer, Baltimore Ravens

    Super Bowl XXXV: Baltimore Ravens 34, New York Giants 7

    Passer rating: 80.9

    Passing stats: 12-for-25, 153 yards, 1 TD/0 INT

    Another quarterback who was able to rest on the laurels of his team’s dominant defense, Dilfer completed under 50 percent of his passes on the night but did not turn the ball over. His 38-yard touchdown pass to Brandon Stokely was the first score of the game, and after that the defense took over. The two teams combined for just 396 total yards (244 for Baltimore and 152 for New York), the fewest in Super Bowl history.

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    #56. Len Dawson, Kansas City Chiefs

    Super Bowl I: Green Bay Packers 35, Kansas City Chiefs 10

    Passer rating: 80.9

    Passing stats: 16-for-27, 211 yards, 1 TD/1 INT

    The first losing quarterback in Super Bowl history, Dawson posted a fairly respectable stat line. But the outmanned Chiefs were no match for Bart Starr and the Packers. Kansas City kept it close for a while, trailing just 14-10 at halftime, before getting outscored 21-0 over the final 30 minutes.

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    #55. Jim Kelly, Buffalo Bills

    Super Bowl XXV: New York Giants 20, Buffalo Bills 19

    Passer rating: 81.5

    Passing stats: 18-for-30, 212 yards, 0 TD/0 INT

    The Bills’ first of four straight Super Bowl losses was the closest and most agonizing. Kelly turned in his best performance of the bunch, protecting the ball against an outstanding Giants defense. He drove the Bills 61 yards on the team’s final drive to the New York 29-yard line, setting up a 47-yard field goal attempt for Scott Norwood. Norwood’s kick sailed wide right, and the Bills have never come closer to winning the title since.

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    #54. Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Colts

    Super Bowl XLI: Indianapolis Colts 29, Chicago Bears 17

    Passer rating: 81.8

    Passing stats: 25-for-38, 247 yards, 1 TD/1 INT

    After years of coming up short, Manning finally got the Super Bowl monkey off his back. It wasn’t Manning’s best game, but he did enough to stake the Colts to a 22-17 lead after three quarters. Kelvin Hayden picked off Chicago’s Rex Grossman and returned it 56 yards for a touchdown with just under 12 minutes left to make the score 29-17 and seal the win.

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    #53. Tom Brady, New England Patriots

    Super Bowl XLII: New York Giants 17, New England Patriots 14

    Passer rating: 82.5

    Passing stats: 29-for-48, 266 yards, 1 TD/0 INT

    Brady’s worst Super Bowl performance came in one of the greatest upsets in football history. The Patriots were a win away from capping off a perfect 19-0 season but were tripped up by the Giants and their defense, which sacked Brady five times, one of which resulted in a turnover.

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    #52. Joe Namath, New York Jets

    Super Bowl III: New York Jets 16, Baltimore Colts 7

    Passer rating: 83.3

    Passing stats: 17-for-28, 206 yards, 0 TD/0 INT

    Against the heavily favored Colts, Namath famously guaranteed a Jets victory days before the game. New York’s defense backed up Namath’s bold words, and the quarterback delivered as well by completing 60.7 percent of his throws to earn Super Bowl MVP honors.

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    #51. John Elway, Denver Broncos

    Super Bowl XXI: New York Giants 39, Denver Broncos 20

    Passer rating: 83.6

    Passing stats: 22-for-37, 304 yards, 1 TD/1 INT

    In his first trip to the Super Bowl, Elway was effective, topping 300 yards and staking Denver to a 10-9 lead at halftime. But the offense stalled in the second half, while New York and quarterback Phil Simms couldn’t be contained. It was the first of three Super Bowl defeats for Elway before he finally broke through with a win in Super Bowl XXXII when he was 37 years old.

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    #50. Tom Brady, New England Patriots

    Super Bowl XXXVI: New England Patriots 20, St. Louis Rams 17

    Passer rating: 86.2

    Passing stats: 16-for-27, 145 yards, 1 TD/0 INT

    Brady is a clear-cut Hall of Famer now, but heading into Super Bowl XXXVI, he was in a situation similar to the one Nick Foles finds himself in now. Brady was pushed into the starting role in the 2001 regular season after starter Drew Bledsoe was injured, and he subsequently led New England on an improbable playoff run en route to the franchise’s first-ever Super Bowl title. On the Patriots’ game-winning drive, Brady was nails, completing 5 out of 8 pass attempts for 53 yards to set up Adam Vinatieri’s game-winning 48-yard field goal.

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    #49. Eli Manning, New York Giants

    Super Bowl XLII: New York Giants 17, New England Patriots 14

    Passer rating: 87.3

    Passing stats: 19-for-34, 255 yards, 2 TD/1 INT

     

    In the Giants’ upset over the perfection-seeking Patriots, Manning put up good stats, but his performance is etched in history mainly for two plays: his game-winning touchdown pass to a wide-open Plaxico Burress with 35 seconds left, and his throw that led to the famous “helmet catch” a few plays earlier. Receiver David Tyree rightly gets credit for making the incredible grab, but just as amazing is Manning’s Houdini-like escape from the New England pass rush.

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    #48. Bob Griese, Miami Dolphins

    Super Bowl VII: Miami Dolphins 14, Washington Redskins 7

    Passer rating: 88.4

    Passing stats: 8-for-11, 88 yards, 1 TD/1 INT

    Griese was efficient during the Dolphins’ 14-7 win over Washington in Super Bowl VII, capping off Miami’s perfect season in the process. The team went 14-0 in the regular season, followed by three consecutive playoff wins. The Dolphins failed to scored in the second half, but it did enough to come away with the title.

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    #47. Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Colts

    Super Bowl XLIV: New Orleans Saints 31, Indianapolis Colts 17

    Passer rating: 88.5

    Passing stats: 31-for-45, 333 yards, 1 TD/1 INT

    In a matchup of two future Hall of Famers, Manning and New Orleans’ Drew Brees were in the midst of a classic into the fourth quarter. With the Saints leading, 24-17, Manning drove the Colts to the New Orleans 31-yard line with under four minutes to play. Facing third down and five, Manning’s pass was picked off by Tracy Porter and returned 74 yards for a touchdown, icing the game for the Saints and preventing Manning from claiming his second Super Bowl title.

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    #46. Len Dawson, Kansas City Chiefs

    Super Bowl IV: Kansas City Chiefs 23, Minnesota Vikings 7

    Passer rating: 90.8

    Passing stats: 12-for-17, 142 yards, 1 TD/1 INT

    After coming up short in Super Bowl I, Dawson led the Chiefs to redemption and a championship three years later. Kansas City opened up a 16-0 lead before Minnesota made it 16-7 late in the third quarter. But Dawson responded on the ensuing possession with a 46-yard touchdown pass to Otis Taylor, putting the game away.

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    #45. Brett Favre, Green Bay Packers

    Super Bowl XXXII: Denver Broncos 31, Green Bay Packers 24

    Passer rating: 91.0

    Passing stats: 25-for-42, 256 yards, 3 TD/1 INT

    Favre and the Packers’ attempt at winning back-to-back Super Bowls fell short against Denver, though Favre played relatively well in the back-and-forth contest. After Denver took the lead with 1:47 left in the game, Favre rattled off four straight completions to advance the ball to the Denver 31. The Broncos held firm, though, as Favre’s next three passes fell incomplete, resulting in a turnover on downs that sealed the game.

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    #44. Tom Brady, New England Patriots

    Super Bowl XLVI: New York Giants 21, New England Patriots 17

    Passer rating: 91.1

    Passing stats: 27-for-41, 276 yards, 2 TD/1 INT

    In a rematch from Super Bowl XLII, Brady again faltered a bit against a stout Giants defense. Brady was sacked just twice this time, but was also called for a safety on the game’s first drive as a result of New York’s pressure. New England led, 17-9, after three quarters, but the offense was shut down from there. Brady was just 6-for-16 in the fourth quarter with no touchdowns and one interception as the Giants pulled off the upset again.

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    #43. Colin Kaepernick, San Francisco 49ers

    Super Bowl XLVII: Baltimore Ravens 34, San Francisco 49ers 31

    Passer rating: 91.7

    Passing stats: 16-for-28, 302 yards, 1 TD/1 INT

    Kaepernick’s 10.8 yards per pass attempt are the 10th-highest in Super Bowl history, and his 348 total yards are the eighth-most. With San Francisco trailing, 34-29, Kaepernick drove the offense down to the Baltimore 5 with two minutes left. The Ravens defense subsequently forced three straight incomplete passes, and the 49ers turned the ball over on downs.

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    #42. Mark Rypien, Washington Redskins

    Super Bowl XXVI: Washington Redskins 37, Buffalo Bills 24

    Passer rating: 92.0

    Passing stats: 18-for-33, 292 yards, 2 TD/1 INT

    After a scoreless first quarter by both teams, Rypien and the Redskins offense caught fire, scoring 24 consecutive points. Buffalo cut the lead to 24-10 midway through the third quarter, but Rypien tossed a 30-yard touchdown pass to Gary Clark on the next drive to essentially put the game out of reach.

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    #41. Ben Roethlisberger, Pittsburgh Steelers

    Super Bowl XLIII: Pittsburgh Steelers 27, Arizona Cardinals 23

    Passer rating: 93.2

    Passing stats: 21-for-30, 256 yards, 1 TD/1 INT

    In one of the most exciting Super Bowls in recent memory, Roethlisberger saved his best for last. After Arizona took a 23-20 lead, Pittsburgh took over on its own 22 with 2:30 left. After a holding penalty pushed the Steelers back to their own 12, Roethlisberger completed 5 of 7 passes for 84 yards, including the game-winning 6-yard score to Santonio Holmes with 42 seconds left.

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    #40. Jeff Hostetler, New York Giants

    Super Bowl XXV: New York Giants 20, Buffalo Bills 19

    Passer rating: 93.5

    Passing stats: 20-for-32, 222 yards, 1 TD/0 INT

    Super Bowl XXV is mostly remembered for Bills kicker Scott Norwood’s missed field goal, but Hostetler turned in a very good performance that was somewhat overshadowed. His 14-yard touchdown pass to Stephen Baker gave New York a 12-10 lead heading into halftime, and he went 4-for-6 for 50 yards during the Giants’ final scoring drive — which ended in a 21-yard field goal by Matt Bahr with eight minutes left to give the team a 20-19 lead that eventually became the final score.

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    #39. Ken Anderson, Cincinnati Bengals

    Super Bowl XVI: San Francisco 49ers 26, Cincinnati Bengals 21

    Passer rating: 95.2

    Passing stats: 25-for-34, 300 yards, 2 TD/2 INT

    Anderson did his best to keep up with Joe Montana and the 49ers, but the Bengals mustered just 72 rushing yards and allowed five sacks. Anderson threw a 4-yard touchdown pass to Dan Ross to make the score 20-14 San Francisco with over 10 minutes left in the fourth quarter, but the 49ers tacked on two field goals that put the game out of reach, as the Bengals’ final touchdown came with just 16 seconds left.

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    #38. Tom Brady, New England Patriots

    Super Bowl LI: New England Patriots 34, Atlanta Falcons 28 (OT)

    Passer rating: 95.2

    Passing stats: 43-for-62, 466 yards, 2 TD/1 INT

    Brady’s 95.2 passer rating in this game ranks at No. 38, but given the context of the game, this is easily among the most memorable and impressive performances in Super Bowl history. After New England fell behind, 28-3, with 8:31 remaining in the third quarter, Brady was completely unstoppable. He led the Patriots on five straight scoring drives — four touchdowns and one field goal — to end the game, including the game-winning drive in overtime. During that span, Brady was 26-for-34 (76.5 percent) for 284 yards and two touchdowns. He set Super Bowl records for most passing yards, attempts and completions, picking up his fifth championship.

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    #37. Bart Starr, Green Bay Packers

    Super Bowl II: Green Bay Packers 33, Oakland Raiders 14

    Passer rating: 96.2

    Passing stats: 13-for-24, 202 yards, 1 TD/0 INT

    Green Bay benefited from three Raiders turnovers and a balanced offensive attack to claim back-to-back Super Bowl titles. Starr’s 62-yard touchdown pass to Boyd Dowler in the second quarter gave the Packers a 13-0 lead, and they eventually led 33-7 early in the fourth quarter. Starr was named the game’s MVP for the second straight year.

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    #36. Jim Plunkett, Los Angeles Raiders

    Super Bowl XVIII: Los Angeles Raiders 38, Washington Redskins 9

    Passer rating: 97.4

    Passing stats: 16-for-25, 172 yards, 1 TD/0 INT

    Though this game belonged to Raiders running back Marcus Allen, who rushed for 191 yards and two touchdowns to earn MVP honors, Plunkett did his part to keep the offense humming. His 12-yard touchdown pass to Cliff Branch gave the Raiders a 14-0 lead early in the second quarter, and Allen took over from there, scoring two third-quarter touchdowns to put the game away.

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    #35. John Elway, Denver Broncos

    Super Bowl XXXIII: Denver Broncos 34, Atlanta Falcons 19

    Passer rating: 99.2

    Passing stats: 18-for-29, 336 yards, 1 TD/1 INT

    Elway saved his best for last in what was the final game of his NFL career. With Denver leading, 10-3, late in the second quarter, Elway completed an 80-yard touchdown pass to Rod Smith to make it 17-3. He tacked on a 3-yard touchdown run in the fourth quarter to make the score 31-6, earning the game’s MVP award before riding off into retirement.

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    #34. Kurt Warner, St. Louis Rams

    Super Bowl XXXIV: St. Louis Rams 23, Tennessee Titans 16

    Passer rating: 99.7

    Passing stats: 24-for-45, 414 yards, 2 TD/0 INT

    Warner came out of nowhere to set the league on fire during the 1999 season, taking home MVP honors after throwing for 4,353 yards and 41 touchdowns. He was outstanding in Super Bowl XXXIV, tossing a 73-yard touchdown pass to Isaac Bruce to give the Rams the lead with under two minutes left in the game that proved to be the winning score.

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    #33. Joe Montana, San Francisco 49ers

     Super Bowl XVI: San Francisco 49ers 26, Cincinnati Bengals 21

    Passer rating: 100.0

    Passing stats: 14-for-22, 157 yards, 1 TD/0 INT

    In four Super Bowls, Montana never had a passer rating under 100. He was named Super Bowl MVP in three of the four games, including this one, in which he accounted for both 49ers touchdowns (one passing and one rushing).

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    #32. Roger Staubach, Dallas Cowboys

    Super Bowl XIII: Pittsburgh Steelers 35, Dallas Cowboys 31

    Passer rating: 100.4

    Passing stats: 17-for-30, 228 yards, 3 TD/1 INT

    Based on passer rating, Staubach’s performance in Super Bowl XIII was the fifth-best by a quarterback in a losing effort. While “Captain America” was phenomenal, he could not keep up with Pittsburgh’s Terry Bradshaw. The Steelers led, 21-17, after three quarters and scored two touchdowns in the fourth to extend the lead to 35-17 before Staubach threw two touchdown passes in the game’s final three minutes.

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    #31. Tom Brady, New England Patriots

    Super Bowl XXXVIII: New England Patriots 32, Carolina Panthers 29

    Passer rating: 100.5

    Passing stats: 32-for-48, 354 yards, 3 TD/1 INT

    Brady was on fire during his second Super Bowl title, taking home game MVP honors yet again. The fourth quarter of this one was incredible, featuring 37 combined points — including Adam Vinatieri’s game-winning 41-yard field goal with four seconds remaining.

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    #30. Tom Brady, New England Patriots

    Super Bowl XLIX: New England Patriots 28, Seattle Seahawks 24

    Passer rating: 101.1

    Passing stats: 37-for-50, 328 yards, 4 TD/2 INT

    Though this game will largely be remembered for the Patriots’ goal line stand in the final minute, Brady was outstanding down the stretch. Trailing by 10 with under 12:10 left, Brady led a nine-play scoring drive to make the score 24-21 with eight minutes to play. New England forced a punt and got the ball back with 6:52 left when Brady went to work again, going 9-for-9 for 71 yards on the drive and capping it with a 3-yard touchdown pass to Julian Edelman to give the Patriots the lead for good.

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    #29. Terry Bradshaw, Pittsburgh Steelers

    Super Bowl XIV: Pittsburgh Steelers 31, Los Angeles Rams 19

    Passer rating: 101.9

    Passing stats: 14-for-21, 309 yards, 2 TD/3 INT

    This was Bradshaw’s lowest passer rating in his four Super Bowl appearances, which says a lot about how amazing the Hall of Famer was in big moments. Bradshaw’s passer rating in Super Bowl XIV ranks as the highest by any Super Bowl quarterback who threw multiple interceptions, and his 14.7 yards per pass attempt are the most in Super Bowl history.

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    #28. Roger Staubach, Dallas Cowboys

    Super Bowl XII: Dallas Cowboys 27, Denver Broncos 10

    Passer rating: 102.6

    Passing stats: 17-for-25, 183 yards, 1 TD/0 INT

    Staubach captured his second Super Bowl title with an efficient performance, but it was the Dallas defense that stole the show in this one. The Cowboys forced eight Broncos turnovers and held Denver to just 156 total yards. Staubach, who had to fend off Craig Morton for the starting job during the postseason, threw a 45-yard touchdown pass to Butch Johnson midway through the third quarter to give the Cowboys a commanding 20-3 lead, and Dallas never looked back.

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    #27. Eli Manning, New York Giants

    Super Bowl XLVI: New York Giants 21, New England Patriots 17

    Passer rating: 103.7

    Passing stats: 30-for-40, 296 yards, 1 TD/0 INT

    Manning was even better in his second Super Bowl matchup against Tom Brady and the Patriots, taking home game MVP honors yet again. His signature play in this one was an ungodly 38-yard completion to Mario Manningham to start the Giants’ go-ahead scoring drive late in the fourth quarter. Ahmad Bradshaw eventually scored a touchdown to put New York ahead, 21-17, with just over a minute to play, and the defense did the rest to clinch the win.

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    #26. Jim McMahon, Chicago Bears

    Super Bowl XX: Chicago Bears 46, New England Patriots 10

    Passer rating: 104.2

    Passing stats: 12-for-20, 256 yards, 0 TD/0 INT

    The Bears defense did whatever it wanted to against an overmatched Patriots offense in Super Bowl XX, rendering McMahon’s performance largely to the background. But McMahon was efficient through the air, and he also rushed for two touchdowns during the blowout.

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    #25. Brett Favre, Green Bay Packers

    Super Bowl XXXI: Green Bay Packers 35, New England Patriots 21

    Passer rating: 107.9

    Passing stats: 14-for-27, 246 yards, 2 TD/0 INT

    Favre was outstanding in his lone Super Bowl victory, capping off an incredible season during which he won the league’s MVP award for the second straight season. Though Packers kick returner Desmond Howard was named the game’s MVP, Favre did his part in tossing two scores and rushing for a touchdown just before halftime.

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    #24. Terry Bradshaw, Pittsburgh Steelers

    Super Bowl IX: Pittsburgh Steelers 16, Minnesota Vikings 6

    Passer rating: 108.0

    Passing stats: 9-for-14, 96 yards, 1 TD/0 INT

    Pittsburgh outlasted Minnesota in a defensive struggle, a Bradshaw was efficient despite failing to crack 100 passing yards. With the Steelers leading, 9-6, Bradshaw engineered an 11-play, 66-yard scoring drive to put the game away, capping it with a four-yard touchdown pass to Larry Brown.

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    #23. Troy Aikman, Dallas Cowboys

    Super Bowl XXX: Dallas Cowboys 27, Pittsburgh Steelers 17

    Passer rating: 108.8

    Passing stats: 15-for-23, 209 yards, 1 TD/0 INT

    Aikman turned in a solid performance in his third and final Super Bowl title, though the Cowboys offense was largely held in check. Dallas was outgained by Pittsburgh, 310-254, but took care of the football. The Steelers, on the other hand, coughed it up three times, all on interceptions thrown by Neil O’Donnell. Those miscues proved to be the difference, though Aikman was efficient throughout the game

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    #22. Tom Brady, New England Patriots

    Super Bowl XXXIX: New England Patriots 24, Philadelphia Eagles 21

    Passer rating: 110.2

    Passing stats: 23-for-33, 236 yards, 2 TD/0 INT

    One year after his heroics in Super Bowl XXXVIII, Brady did it again to give New England its second consecutive championship and third in four years. While this is Brady’s best passer rating in the Super Bowl, it’s ironically the only one of his five Super Bowl wins in which he was not named the game’s MVP. That honor went instead to receiver Deion Branch, who tied the Super Bowl record with 11 receptions.

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    #21. Russell Wilson, Seattle Seahawks

     Super Bowl XLIX: New England Patriots 28, Seattle Seahawks 24

    Passer rating: 110.6

    Passing stats: 12-for-21, 247 yards, 2 TD/1 INT

    Unfortunately for Wilson, this game will forever be remembered for his interception at the goal line that cost Seattle the win and back-to-back championships. Until that infamous ending, though, Wilson was phenomenal, averaging 11.8 yards per pass attempt — fifth-best in Super Bowl history. He also added 39 rushing yards, second-most on the team.

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    #20. Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay Packers

    Super Bowl XLV: Green Bay Packers 31, Pittsburgh Steelers 25

    Passer rating: 111.5

    Passing stats: 24-for-39, 304 yards, 3 TD/0 INT

    Of the top 20 passer rating performances in Super Bowl history, 17 of them came from winning quarterbacks, including Rodgers’ outstanding game in Super Bowl XLV. It was only Rodgers’ third year as the starting quarterback, and he outdueled two-time Super Bowl champion Ben Roethlisberger to take home the title. Rodgers went on to win league MVP honors the following season, adding on to what’s sure to be a Hall of Fame career.

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    #19. Ken Stabler, Oakland Raiders

    Super Bowl XI: Oakland Raiders 32, Minnesota Vikings 14

    Passer rating: 111.7

    Passing stats: 12-for-19, 180 yards, 1 TD/0 INT

    Stabler and the Raiders offense built up a 19-0 lead midway through the third quarter and never looked back, eventually leading 32-7 into the fourth. Though Stabler was steady and efficient, the game’s MVP award went to wide receiver Fred Biletnikoff, who hauled in four catches for a game-high 79 yards.

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    #18. Kurt Warner, Arizona Cardinals

    Super Bowl XLIII: Pittsburgh Steelers 27, Arizona Cardinals 23

    Passer rating: 112.3

    Passing stats: 31-for-43, 377 yards, 3 TD/1 INT

    Warner was on the wrong end of what was probably the game’s most iconic play — a 100-yard interception returned for a touchdown by Steelers linebacker James Harrison on the last play of the first half. Aside from that blemish, Warner was outstanding, putting the Cardinals ahead, 23-20, with 2:47 left in the game on a 64-yard touchdown pass to Larry Fitzgerald. Pittsburgh’s Ben Roethlisberger subsequently led the Steelers on an eight-play scoring drive to win the game.

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    #17. Jake Delhomme, Carolina Panthers

    Super Bowl XXXVIII: New England Patriots 32, Carolina Panthers 29

    Passer rating: 113.6

    Passing stats: 16-for-33, 323 yards, 3 TD/0 INT

    Delhomme actually outdueled Tom Brady in this game from a passer rating perspective, but Brady got the last laugh by leading the Patriots to another last-second win. Delhomme threw two touchdown passes in the game’s final seven minutes, including an 85-yard pass to Muhsin Muhammad.

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    #16. Drew Brees, New Orleans Saints

    Super Bowl XLIV: New Orleans Saints 31, Indianapolis Colts 17

    Passer rating: 114.5

    Passing stats: 32-for-39, 288 yards, 2 TD/0 INT

    Brees outdueled Peyton Manning in a near-flawless performance, tossing a go-ahead touchdown pass to Jeremy Shockey with 5:42 left to put the Saints ahead, 24-17, before Tracy Porter’s interception returned for a touchdown sealed the victory. Brees’ 82.1 completion percentage is the second-highest in Super Bowl history among players with at least 10 pass attempts.

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    #15. Joe Montana, San Francisco 49ers

    Super Bowl XXIII: San Francisco 49ers 20, Cincinnati Bengals 16

    Passer rating: 115.2

    Passing stats: 23-for-36, 357 yards, 2 TD/0 INT

    Montana has three Super Bowls in the top 15 based on passer rating, starting with Super Bowl XXIII. The game is best remembered for San Francisco’s 11-play, 92-yard touchdown drive in the final minutes, capped by Montana’s 10-yard scoring strike to John Taylor.

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    #14. Roger Staubach, Dallas Cowboys

    Super Bowl VI: Dallas Cowboys 24, Miami Dolphins 3

    Passer rating: 115.9

    Passing stats: 12-for-19, 119 yards, 2 TD/0 INT

    The Dallas defense stymied Miami’s offense, holding the Dolphins to just 185 total yards and forcing three turnovers. Staubach, for his part, was crisp and efficient, with touchdown passes in the second and fourth quarters, earning the game’s MVP award.

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    #13. Bart Starr, Green Bay Packers

    Super Bowl I: Green Bay Packers 35, Kansas City Chiefs 10

    Passer rating: 116.2

    Passing stats: 16-for-23, 250 yards, 2 TD/1 INT

    Starr stole the show in Super Bowl I, setting the tone with a 37-yard touchdown pass to Max McGee in the first quarter. After Kansas City scored to tie the game early in the second quarter, Starr and the Packers outscored the Chiefs, 28-3, for the remainder of the game.

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    #12. Terry Bradshaw, Pittsburgh Steelers

    Super Bowl XIII: Pittsburgh Steelers 35, Dallas Cowboys 31

    Passer rating: 119.2

    Passing stats: 17-for-30, 318 yards, 4 TD/1 INT

    Bradshaw tossed four touchdowns against the Cowboys in this one — his career high for the Super Bowl — including three in the first half. His 18-yard scoring strike to Lynn Swann with under seven minutes left in the game effectively sealed the win, though the Cowboys scored twice in the final three minutes to close the gap.

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    #11. Terry Bradshaw, Pittsburgh Steelers

    Super Bowl X: Pittsburgh Steelers 21, Dallas Cowboys 17

    Passer rating: 122.5

    Passing stats: 9-for-19, 209 yards, 2 TD/0 INT

    Bradshaw’s best Super Bowl performance from a passer rating perspective required a bit more heroics, as the Steelers actually trailed, 10-9, early in the fourth quarter. After the Steelers fell behind, Bradshaw led three consecutive scoring drives to take the lead for good, capping the run with a 64-yard touchdown pass to Lynn Swann with just over three minutes left to put Pittsburgh ahead, 21-10.

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    #10. Russell Wilson, Seattle Seahawks

    Super Bowl XLVIII: Seattle Seahawks 43, Denver Broncos 8

    Passer rating: 123.1

    Passing stats: 18-for-25, 206 yards, 2 TD/0 INT

    In a game dominated by Seattle’s defense, Wilson was quietly outstanding. He led the Seahawks on scoring drives in each of their first three possessions, helping to essentially put the game away by halftime. In addition to his strong performance through the air, Wilson also tacked on 26 rushing yards.

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    #9. Joe Flacco, Baltimore Ravens

    Super Bowl XLVII: Baltimore Ravens 34, San Francisco 49ers 31

    Passer rating: 124.2

    Passing stats: 22-for-33, 287 yards, 3 TD/0 INT

    Is Joe Flacco elite? He was in this game, capping off an incredible postseason run in which he threw 11 touchdown passes with no interceptions in four games. Without much help from the running game, Flacco outdueled San Francisco’s Colin Kaepernick, giving the Ravens their second championship in franchise history.

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    #8. Joe Montana, San Francisco 49ers

    Super Bowl XIX: San Francisco 49ers 38, Miami Dolphins 16

    Passer rating: 127.2

    Passing stats: 24-for-35, 331 yards, 3 TD/0 INT

    Montana and the 49ers offense gained 537 total yards in Super Bowl XIX, a record at the time that’s since been broken only once. Montana threw two touchdown passes in the first half to give San Francisco a 28-16 lead at the break, and his third put the 49ers up 38-16 to cap the scoring.

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    #7. Doug Williams, Washington Redskins

    Super Bowl XXII: Washington Redskins 42, Denver Broncos 10

    Passer rating: 127.9

    Passing stats: 18-for-29, 340 yards, 4 TD/1 INT

    Williams was the backup for most of the 1987 season, starting only two games during the regular season (both losses), but was tabbed as the starter for the playoffs. The move paid off, as Williams and the Redskins knocked off John Elway and the Broncos, thanks to a 35-point outburst in the second quarter, during which Williams threw all four of his touchdowns. In six second-quarter possessions, Denver punted three times, threw two interceptions and missed a field goal. Washington, meanwhile, ripped big play after big play, with three touchdowns of 50 yards or more.

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    #6. Steve Young, San Francisco 49ers

    Super Bowl XXIX: San Francisco 49ers 49, San Diego Chargers 26

    Passer rating: 134.8

    Passing stats: 24-for-36, 325 yards, 6 TD/0 INT

    After winning two Super Bowls as the backup quarterback, Young finally stepped out of the shadows on the big stage. His six touchdown passes are a Super Bowl record, and he also was the game’s leading rusher with 49 yards.

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    #5. Troy Aikman, Dallas Cowboys

    Super Bowl XXVII: Dallas Cowboys 52, Buffalo Bills 17

    Passer rating: 140.7

    Passing stats: 22-for-30, 273 yards, 4 TD/0 INT

    In his first Super Bowl appearance, Aikman was unstoppable. He threw three touchdowns in the first half to give Dallas a 28-10 lead at the break, and his 45-yard scoring strike to Alvin Harper early in the fourth quarter extended the Cowboys’ lead to 38-17, effectively clinching the win.

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    #4. Matt Ryan, Atlanta Falcons

     Super Bowl LI: New England Patriots 34, Atlanta Falcons 28 (OT)

    Passer rating: 144.1

    Passing stats: 17-for-23, 284 yards, 2 TD/0 INT

    Ryan put forth the greatest quarterback performance in a losing effort in Super Bowl history, staking Atlanta to a 28-3 lead midway through the third quarter. The Falcons’ defense completely fell apart from there, and the offense sputtered, with Ryan losing a fumble and taking a crucial late sack to push Atlanta out of field goal range on a late fourth-quarter drive that could have put the game away.

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    #3. Jim Plunkett, Oakland Raiders

    Super Bowl XV: Oakland Raiders 27, Philadelphia Eagles 10

    Passer rating: 145.0

    Passing stats: 13-for-21, 261 yards, 3 TD/0 INT

    Plunkett threw two touchdown passes in the first quarter to give Oakland a 14-0 lead, and the Raiders’ defense did the rest, forcing four Eagles turnovers. Plunkett’s 15.3 adjusted yards per pass attempt are the most in Super Bowl history.

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    #2. Joe Montana, San Francisco 49ers

    Super Bowl XXIV: San Francisco 49ers 55, Denver Broncos 10

    Passer rating: 147.6

    Passing stats: 22-for-29, 297 yards, 5 TD/0 INT

    Montana was unstoppable in what would be his final Super Bowl appearance, as the 49ers blew out the Broncos. Montana threw three touchdowns in the first half to give San Francisco a commanding 27-3 lead, and tacked on two more in the third quarter for good measure. The 49ers’ 55 points are the most ever by a team in Super Bowl history, and their 45-point margin of victory is also a record.

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    #1. Phil Simms, New York Giants

    Super Bowl XXI: New York Giants 39, Denver Broncos 20

    Passer rating: 150.9

    Passing stats: 22-for-25, 268 yards, 3 TD/0 INT

    Simms was nearly perfect in Super Bowl XXI, setting the record for highest completion percentage in the game’s history. The Giants actually trailed, 10-9, at halftime but outscored Denver 17-0 in the third quarter, during which Simms was 8-for-8 for 123 yards and a touchdown pass. His 6-yard touchdown pass to Phil McConkey early in the fourth quarter put the game away, clinching the Giants’ first-ever Super Bowl victory.

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